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Thread: 5g

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    5g

    I picked up a Galaxy Note 10 from AT&T for my work phone. I use it as both a phone and tethered hot-spot because my location requires it.

    Much to my surprise and pleasure it turns out that this area, while no where near 5G on the official AT&T distribution map, has what I assume is an experimental, solar powered 5G link floating out on the bay. Nautical maps and my live Wi-Fi map on my phone line up with a navigation buoy.

    So anyway, I get to play around with what is basically my own personal 5G hub now. It's rather impressive given how many hops it needs to make to get on to the internet. I can only assume that this test buoy is also alternating modes during it's test cycle. The buoy is probably about a mile out on the water, and likely is connecting to the internet somewhere out on the DELMARVA peninsula, but I am getting under 20ms latency at worst, and the slowest speed test is about 35mbps... so better than the highest speed I ever got out here on 4G.

    Also, those speeds I see are the worst I experience. On a good day I can hit 200 mbps

    The way 5G works is that most devices operate as hubs that can establish hundreds of concurrent connections and build redundant webs of interlinked devices that serve as a virtual wired network. In theory, each hop ads about 1 ms of latency, though I'm guessing I'm getting consistently more than that... but still very manageable for any use other than competitive FPS gaming. So my connection to this buoy facilitates a connection that buoy made with another device closer to an internet hub, and so on. In practice, unlike cable and 4G services, there is no huge infrastructure project needed to roll it out. No cables to run, no towers to erect. It's just getting enough people and devices in the field to create these networks. It won't be long before rural areas will have just as much internet service as urban areas.

    This tech is going to change the world.
    The only path to truth is paved with skepticism.

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    Re: 5g

    Quote Originally Posted by jmotivator View Post
    I picked up a Galaxy Note 10 from AT&T for my work phone. I use it as both a phone and tethered hot-spot because my location requires it.

    Much to my surprise and pleasure it turns out that this area, while no where near 5G on the official AT&T distribution map, has what I assume is an experimental, solar powered 5G link floating out on the bay. Nautical maps and my live Wi-Fi map on my phone line up with a navigation buoy.

    So anyway, I get to play around with what is basically my own personal 5G hub now. It's rather impressive given how many hops it needs to make to get on to the internet. I can only assume that this test buoy is also alternating modes during it's test cycle. The buoy is probably about a mile out on the water, and likely is connecting to the internet somewhere out on the DELMARVA peninsula, but I am getting under 20ms latency at worst, and the slowest speed test is about 35mbps... so better than the highest speed I ever got out here on 4G.

    Also, those speeds I see are the worst I experience. On a good day I can hit 200 mbps

    The way 5G works is that most devices operate as hubs that can establish hundreds of concurrent connections and build redundant webs of interlinked devices that serve as a virtual wired network. In theory, each hop ads about 1 ms of latency, though I'm guessing I'm getting consistently more than that... but still very manageable for any use other than competitive FPS gaming. So my connection to this buoy facilitates a connection that buoy made with another device closer to an internet hub, and so on. In practice, unlike cable and 4G services, there is no huge infrastructure project needed to roll it out. No cables to run, no towers to erect. It's just getting enough people and devices in the field to create these networks. It won't be long before rural areas will have just as much internet service as urban areas.

    This tech is going to change the world.
    I would ask around, and make sure it is a legitimate hotspot, least you might be giving your information away.
    If it is legitimate, what a cool idea, the range over water could be quite a distance.

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    Re: 5g

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    I would ask around, and make sure it is a legitimate hotspot, least you might be giving your information away.
    If it is legitimate, what a cool idea, the range over water could be quite a distance.
    I think most people could figure out where I am with a little effort, but good luck finding me in person.

    I have to tools to query the towers and links I connect to and my phone authenticates it as a genuine AT&T 5G hub, so I think I am good. If ne're-do-wells can already infiltrate 5G meshes with imitation hardware then we're all screwed.
    The only path to truth is paved with skepticism.

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    Re: 5g

    Update: On further review, the buoy in question is actually powered and runs a host of navigational signalling services for local boaters, so the 5G hotspot is likely just a normal plug-in device. I'm still curious where it links to, though. I see a few 5G nodes showing up further inland, but I am not connecting to them... so one of two guesses:

    1) It's easier than I thought and the powered buoy also is wired for internet and the node is plugged into the buoy's internet...

    2) Or the node has a better connection than I can manage to the other nodes further inland, so I'm making the connection out to the buoy that is then hopping back past me to an inland node on my side of the water.

    More on 5G..

    The other cool thing about this technology is that it can maintain a constant, stable, low latency connection between nodes even at relative speeds of 70 mph, so when vehicles start getting built with built-in 5G hubs, the highways themselves will become extended, virtual wired networks.

    Granted, that is probably when Skynet becomes self-aware...
    The only path to truth is paved with skepticism.

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    Re: 5g

    5G is a bit of a scam imo. Why? Few mobile operators have unlimited data, which means that with 5G you just use your data faster..

    Whats the point of having 40mbit or 70mbit if you only have say 10 GB a month?

    Sent from my Honor 8X
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    Re: 5g

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    5G is a bit of a scam imo. Why? Few mobile operators have unlimited data, which means that with 5G you just use your data faster..

    Whats the point of having 40mbit or 70mbit if you only have say 10 GB a month?

    Sent from my Honor 8X
    True unlimited data is a hose, not a bucket. I dont buy buckets when I need data.
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    Re: 5g

    I will wait to adopt 5G to see if it results in better data plans. I am not optimistic though.

    The performance I get on 4G works just fine for me in my iphone 8.
    "This is America - and here, right matters."

    - Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, Director for European Affairs for the United States National Security Council

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    Re: 5g

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteEU View Post
    5G is a bit of a scam imo. Why? Few mobile operators have unlimited data, which means that with 5G you just use your data faster..

    Whats the point of having 40mbit or 70mbit if you only have say 10 GB a month?

    Sent from my Honor 8X

    The reason there are limits is because with 4G there are cell towers that have limited bandwidth that all people who connect must share. In early 5G there is a similar bottleneck as the number of paths of egress into the internet are limited. Even still, the otherwise exceptionally stingy AT&T has been rapidly changing and adding plans that make more sense for 5G users.

    When I bought the phone two months ago the top plan they offered me was 30gb/month and 15gb/month tethering. For $5 more a month they now offer me 100gb/month and 30gb of tethering and a slew of content provider services like Hulu that don't even count towards my monthly cap.

    When 5G is fully deployed and your device has hundreds of potential paths of egress, I wouldn't be surprised to see unlimited, no cap plans starting for 5G service, with a stipulation that a cap will apply when on 4G.

    But then, also consider that it will be monumentally easier for competition in the 5G market since startups will no longer need to lease bandwidth from carrier towers if they are providing a 5G only service, all they need to do is provide devices.

    I can also see the traditional wired network providers starting to offer free unlimited 5G if you agree to upgrade your home modem to a new model that will operate as a 5G hub. This would be mutually beneficial and allow them to remain competitive in a new market. The real threat to 5G is a decline in egress points as people stop paying for wired internet. The industry will need to incentivize people to keep those connections
    The only path to truth is paved with skepticism.

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    Re: 5g

    Quote Originally Posted by tacomancer View Post
    I will wait to adopt 5G to see if it results in better data plans. I am not optimistic though.

    The performance I get on 4G works just fine for me in my iphone 8.
    My AT&T plan with 5G went from 30gb/month to 100gb/month for an additional $5.
    The only path to truth is paved with skepticism.

  10. #10
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    Re: 5g

    Quote Originally Posted by jmotivator View Post
    I picked up a Galaxy Note 10 from AT&T for my work phone. I use it as both a phone and tethered hot-spot because my location requires it.

    Much to my surprise and pleasure it turns out that this area, while no where near 5G on the official AT&T distribution map, has what I assume is an experimental, solar powered 5G link floating out on the bay. Nautical maps and my live Wi-Fi map on my phone line up with a navigation buoy.

    So anyway, I get to play around with what is basically my own personal 5G hub now. It's rather impressive given how many hops it needs to make to get on to the internet. I can only assume that this test buoy is also alternating modes during it's test cycle. The buoy is probably about a mile out on the water, and likely is connecting to the internet somewhere out on the DELMARVA peninsula, but I am getting under 20ms latency at worst, and the slowest speed test is about 35mbps... so better than the highest speed I ever got out here on 4G.

    Also, those speeds I see are the worst I experience. On a good day I can hit 200 mbps

    The way 5G works is that most devices operate as hubs that can establish hundreds of concurrent connections and build redundant webs of interlinked devices that serve as a virtual wired network. In theory, each hop ads about 1 ms of latency, though I'm guessing I'm getting consistently more than that... but still very manageable for any use other than competitive FPS gaming. So my connection to this buoy facilitates a connection that buoy made with another device closer to an internet hub, and so on. In practice, unlike cable and 4G services, there is no huge infrastructure project needed to roll it out. No cables to run, no towers to erect. It's just getting enough people and devices in the field to create these networks. It won't be long before rural areas will have just as much internet service as urban areas.

    This tech is going to change the world.
    If one can afford it yes it will change the world. The whole concept of increasing bandwidth is to sell new products..
    To live is to suffer~Fritz Lang

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