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Thread: The American interest: "Why Putins Threat to Belarus Cant Be Ignored"

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    The American interest: "Why Putins Threat to Belarus Cant Be Ignored"

    The American interest: "Why Putins Threat to Belarus Cant Be Ignored" great article, Finlay the west woke up , hit stolen Siberian oil - gas , and maslistanŽll be over in the weeks

    "Why Putin’s Threat to Belarus Can’t Be Ignored Michael Carpenter, Vlad Kobets, & David J. Kramer

    As Russia seeks a deeper integration with Belarus, the masses in Minsk are protesting against a “soft annexation.” It’s time for the West to take notice.

    In Europe this month, all eyes were trained on the NATO heads of state gathering in London, followed by the Paris meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian President Volodymy Zelenskyy and the dramatic election in Britain. These major events, however, largely overshadowed another consequential meeting—one held on December 7 between Putin and the long-term leader of Belarus. Theirs is a relationship that bears watching.

    Meeting for more than five hours in the Russian resort town of Sochi, Putin and Aleksandr Lukashenko discussed a roadmap for integrating the two countries. An ambitious plan to harmonize tax, customs, trade, and regulatory regimes, and to adopt a single, common currency, is on the table. Many view this as the Kremlin’s plan for the “soft annexation” of Belarus. In an interview late last month, Belarus’s Ambassador to Moscow, Uladzimir Syamashka, stated that Lukashenko and Putin had even approved plans to establish a common government and parliament.

    But ahead of the Sochi meeting, Lukashenko declared, “We never intended and never will become part of any other state—even the brotherly Russia.” After the meeting and upon Lukashenko’s return to Minsk, a top Belarusian military official announced that Belarus is willing to take part in NATO war games—to be called “Defender Europe”—next year. Belarus is even willing to play the “China card”; it announced last week its intention to borrow $500 million from Beijing to pay off existing debt.

    Opposition inside Belarus to closer relations with Russia is building. Before the December 7 meeting, more than a thousand demonstrators braved the secret police to protest against integration in Minsk, the capital of Belarus. Another demonstration was soon scheduled for December 20, the day Lukashenko and Putin agreed to meet again. Early reports estimated nearly 2,000 people turned out in Minsk that day, many chanting “No Union with Imperial Russia.” Ahead of this second protest, Belarusian authorities detained two opposition figures, Paval Sevyarynets and Maksim Vinyarski—a reflection, perhaps, that the pressure on Lukashenko is growing both internally and from Moscow.

    Dubbed “the last dictatorship in Europe,” Belarus can appear to the outside observer as if frozen in time. In power for more than 25 years, Lukashenko is the longest serving leader in Europe and announced last month that he will run for yet another term in next year’s so-called presidential election. The secret police is still called the KGB, statues of Lenin are ubiquitous, and Red Army lore is widely celebrated.

    Last month’s parliamentary elections, widely panned by international observers, were like a Soviet redux wherein the regime parties dominated every seat in parliament and the opposition was not even given the chance to compete. “These elections have demonstrated an overall lack of respect for democratic commitments,” said Margareta Cederfelt, leader of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) short-term observer mission. “In a country in which the power and independence of parliament is limited and fundamental freedoms are restricted for both voters and candidates, parliamentary elections are in danger of becoming a formality,” she added.

    And yet beneath the surface of the country’s ossified political structure, its social foundations are quickly shifting. Belarus is undergoing three simultaneous transformations. First, a national revival is instilling a stronger sense of Belarusian identity. In this mostly Russophone nation, there is rising interest in the Belarusian language, culture, and history. Second, a growing civic consciousness, especially among the younger generation, is being channeled into an increasingly vibrant civil society. Third, the decades-long acceptance of Belarus’s status as a loyal subject of the Kremlin is gradually coming undone as Belarusians increasingly look to their independent statehood as a value to be promoted and defended.

    ”"https://www.the-american-interest.com/2019/12/21/why-putins-threat-to-belarus-cant-be-ignored/
    Karl Marx : "The bloody mire of Mongolian slavery, not the rude glory of the Norman epoch, forms the cradle of Muscovy, and modern "Russia" is but a metamorphosis of Muscovy."

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    Re: The American interest: "Why Putins Threat to Belarus Cant Be Ignored"

    West must keep russian raptor’s claws off Belarus

    "If you want to be president for life you have to plan ahead. Vladimir Putin’s time runs out in 2024 and he has choices to make. The constitution is clear: “One and the same person may not be elected president of the Russian Federation for more than two consecutive terms.”

    He can, however, award himself a temporary demotion to prime minister (as he did, grump*ily, in 2008) and return to the presidency in 2030. But he will be 78 by then and why, he might be thinking, hang around doing the grunt work?

    The most attractive option for the Kremlin’s raptor-in-chief could be to annex neighbouring Belarus. The two countries signed a union treaty in 1996 that calls for a federation-type state, the long-term allegiance of Belarus to Russia. If this were fleshed out and the economies were fully integrated, the result would be a pumped-up Russia Plus. Putin could take over seamlessly as the head of state of a new entity, sparing him the bother of removing his stuff from his Kremlin office.
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    The problem with this script is that Belarus is already ruled by another man who is equally keen to stay put: Alexander Lukashenko, sometimes billed as Europe’s last dictator. To satisfy Putin’s ambition to be the eternal father of the nation, Lukashenko will have to budge."


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    Karl Marx : "The bloody mire of Mongolian slavery, not the rude glory of the Norman epoch, forms the cradle of Muscovy, and modern "Russia" is but a metamorphosis of Muscovy."

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    Re: The American interest: "Why Putins Threat to Belarus Cant Be Ignored"

    Why does the image in your op have a tank driving to iceland, they must have some badass tanks to also be submarines.
    Proposition 65 warning- my posts are known to the state of California to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm.

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    Re: The American interest: "Why Putins Threat to Belarus Cant Be Ignored"

    Quote Originally Posted by beerftw View Post
    Why does the image in your op have a tank driving to iceland, they must have some badass tanks to also be submarines.
    vovka putler is a well-known wet dreamer
    Is Russia’s Doomsday Missile Fake News? – Foreign Policy
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/gdpr-...ally-new%2f%3f
    Karl Marx : "The bloody mire of Mongolian slavery, not the rude glory of the Norman epoch, forms the cradle of Muscovy, and modern "Russia" is but a metamorphosis of Muscovy."

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