View Poll Results: If the cost of cancer treatment goes up significantly, which of the following results?

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  • Less people get cancer - supply and demand.

    0 0%
  • More people get cancer.

    1 3.23%
  • The cost of cancer treatment has nothing at all to do with the number of people with cancer.

    30 96.77%
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Thread: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

  1. #1
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    Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    If the price of houses go up too much, then less people buy a home and instead opt to live with their parents longer, share rent with someone and so on. If the price of a new car goes up too much, then less people buy a new car, and instead will continue to drive older ones, share a car and so on. If the price of a new TV goes up too much, you don't buy one, or you buy less of them. That is how it works with most goods and services.

    With that in mind, is there any relationship at all between the cost of cancer treatment and the number of people afflicted with cancer? Is there any relationship at all with the cost of a heart bypass, and the number of people with a coronary blockage? Is there any relationship between the cost of insulin, and the number of diabetics?
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    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernDemocrat View Post
    If the price of houses go up too much, then less people buy a home and instead opt to live with their parents longer, share rent with someone and so on. If the price of a new car goes up too much, then less people buy a new car, and instead will continue to drive older ones, share a car and so on. If the price of a new TV goes up too much, you don't buy one, or you buy less of them. That is how it works with most goods and services.

    With that in mind, is there any relationship at all between the cost of cancer treatment and the number of people afflicted with cancer? Is there any relationship at all with the cost of a heart bypass, and the number of people with a coronary blockage? Is there any relationship between the cost of insulin, and the number of diabetics?
    These are all questions related to a “for profit” healthcare system.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by Rexedgar View Post
    These are all questions related to a “for profit” healthcare system.
    I am obviously trying to prove a point here. There are those that argue that we need to make healthcare more subject to market forces. In a true fully functioning market, if the cost of chemo went up too much, the number of breast cancer sufferers would go down - supply and demand. Of course, we know that isn't the case. It's why every other developed nation recognizes that necessary healthcare is a market failure.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Obviously the same number of people would get cancer.

    However, as costs go up they would be less likely to be diagnosed or treated, and so the reported totals would likely drop.

    It's just a way that statistics tend to trick us.

    Another example is how marijuana usage sometimes appears to go up significantly when it is made legal, but it is difficult to determine how much of this is people being more willing to admit they use marijuana, even though they used before and after the laws changed.

    P.S. -

    Market forces could work wonders on prescriptions drug costs, as we are shafted mightily on those in the U.S.
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  5. #5

    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by Rexedgar View Post
    These are all questions related to a “for profit” healthcare system.
    Imo the debate on this topic should be whether for profit healthcare drives costs up or down. I am of the opinion that if we opened it up to more free market principles the costs would go down not up.

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    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by trouble13 View Post
    Imo the debate on this topic should be whether for profit healthcare drives costs up or down. I am of the opinion that if we opened it up to more free market principles the costs would go down not up.

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    I dont see where that happens

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    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernDemocrat View Post
    If the price of houses go up too much, then less people buy a home and instead opt to live with their parents longer, share rent with someone and so on. If the price of a new car goes up too much, then less people buy a new car, and instead will continue to drive older ones, share a car and so on. If the price of a new TV goes up too much, you don't buy one, or you buy less of them. That is how it works with most goods and services.

    With that in mind, is there any relationship at all between the cost of cancer treatment and the number of people afflicted with cancer? Is there any relationship at all with the cost of a heart bypass, and the number of people with a coronary blockage? Is there any relationship between the cost of insulin, and the number of diabetics?
    Solve simple poverty so every adult can afford some kind of coverage or make payments on a longitudinal basis; that increase in market participation can spread out more of the costs.

  8. #8

    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by vegas giants View Post
    I dont see where that happens
    Where has it been implemented?

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    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by trouble13 View Post
    Where has it been implemented?

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    So you want a plan that has never been implemented anywhere to be experimented on with the American healthcare system?

  10. #10

    Re: Necessary Healthcare - Supply and Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by vegas giants View Post
    So you want a plan that has never been implemented anywhere to be experimented on with the American healthcare system?
    No i was asking you a question. You cpaimed it does not work. I was looking for examples where it failed.

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