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Thread: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    I must research this local phenom in more detail. For the record, I grill out back and will not embrace the 'grilling out front' demographic

    -VySky
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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
    Better than beef. The only draw back is the moose fat becomes bitter when cooked, so it is always removed (moose are very lean anyway) and replaced with either beef or pork fat. I had some moose pastrami a friend made and I've never forgotten it, it was that good. Corned moose is also better than beef. It has a more intense flavor than beef, but not in a gamey way. If given a choice over equal cuts of beef or moose I would choose moose every time.

    Caribou is a lot like veal. Well marbled with fat and makes very tasty roasts and steaks. It has a much more subtle flavor, not as strong as either moose or beef. If I was serving wine it would be either a pinot or merlot with the caribou, and a full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon with the moose.
    Are you a wine person then? (I am not but have a family member who works in a winery, so I've learned a lot more about tannin and why rose bushes are planted at the ends of grape rows and blah-blah-blah than I ever needed to know.)

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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
    Unless you have a subsistence permit (which are only issued to residents of the State) you can only hunt them while in season from September 1st to September 20th. Also, if you are not a resident of Alaska you must hire a State-registered guide.

    September is also when bears are getting ready for hibernation and looking to eat anything they can get their paws on. Which makes picking berries or hunting moose particularly dangerous. Alaska law prohibits hunters from defending their game. As long as someone is working over the kill you are relatively safe, but as soon as you leave part of your kill to haul back your first load of meat and all the other predators swarm in. By the time you get back from taking your first load of meat to your vehicle, your kill is gone. So you want to be able to haul the entire moose in one trip, or have more than one person hunting with you so someone can guard the moose meat while the other hauls it back to the vehicle.

    Alaska law also requires every hunter to salvage as much meat from their game as possible. People have been charged and prosecuted for wasting meat on a carcass before. You don't have to keep the meat if you don't want it, but you can't sell it. You can only give it away.

    He probably hasn't gone moose hunting in Alaska because guide fees tend to be in the thousands of dollars. The same is also true with State-registered bear guides. Non-residents are required to hire an Alaskan guide for all big game. It isn't some kind of scam to make Alaskans rich either. Those guides have saved countless of lives, particularly when bear hunting. A lot of the guides I've talked with tell me people forget to take the required second shot when hunting bear, or they bring an under-powered firearm. In such cases they simply add more to their fee.

    Unless you are familiar with Alaska's forests, it is not particularly wise to be stumbling around by yourself unprotected.
    I really appreciate your sharing all this information--so interesting.

    Sounds to me as if serious hunters probably dream of the challenge of hunting moose. It sounds terrifying to me.

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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    What an enjoyable thread to read.

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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    Quote Originally Posted by nota bene View Post
    Are you a wine person then? (I am not but have a family member who works in a winery, so I've learned a lot more about tannin and why rose bushes are planted at the ends of grape rows and blah-blah-blah than I ever needed to know.)
    I do enjoy a nice Chardonnay or Cabernet. I also fell into the English custom of having vintage port after a fine meal, except that I substitute the customary walnuts for almond-filled M&Ms. I think the chocolate and almonds work better with the port.

    I would not describe myself as being very knowledgeable with regard to wine, but I know a little about flavors and I don't want a full bodied wine over-powering a delicately flavored fish or a subtle caribou roast. I save the big bold wines for those dishes with big bold flavors, where something like a merot might get completely lost in the flavors of the dish. A good pairing will mean the wine enhances or lifts the dish to another level.

    I look at wine, and alcohol in general, as an ingredient to elevate the flavor of my food.

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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    Quote Originally Posted by nota bene View Post
    I really appreciate your sharing all this information--so interesting.

    Sounds to me as if serious hunters probably dream of the challenge of hunting moose. It sounds terrifying to me.
    The risks are high, but so are the rewards. You are talking about 950 to 1,000 pounds of dressed moose meat. To put that into perspective, a typical beef cow will dress out at between 550 and 600 pounds, which includes between 25 and 30 pounds of offal. So a 5 year-old male moose has more meat than 1.5 beef cows. That is a lot of meat and you will need a lot of freezer space. I have a 42 cu. ft. upright freezer in the garage for caribou and moose (when I get it). I can just fit half a moose in that upright freezer. Which is another reason why I hunt with a partner. I also keep a 10 cu. ft. chest freezer in my foyer for my salmon and game birds.

    I haven't taken a moose since 2006. I use to hunt with a friend who owned a large tractor fitted to handle muskeg (northern bog/swamp). He had a winch that would lift the moose and place it in the bed of the tractor. That way we could dress our kill next to our vehicles at our leisure and not have to worry about other predators. Unfortunately my friend moved to Utah in 2006, and I don't hunt moose alone.

    Alaska allows residents who are 65 years old and older to have someone proxy hunt for them. I get the tags for free, I just need to find a friend willing to hunt for me.

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    Re: Why Do Southerners Barbeque Out Front?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
    I do enjoy a nice Chardonnay or Cabernet. I also fell into the English custom of having vintage port after a fine meal, except that I substitute the customary walnuts for almond-filled M&Ms. I think the chocolate and almonds work better with the port.

    I would not describe myself as being very knowledgeable with regard to wine, but I know a little about flavors and I don't want a full bodied wine over-powering a delicately flavored fish or a subtle caribou roast. I save the big bold wines for those dishes with big bold flavors, where something like a merot might get completely lost in the flavors of the dish. A good pairing will mean the wine enhances or lifts the dish to another level.

    I look at wine, and alcohol in general, as an ingredient to elevate the flavor of my food.
    My favorite wine is either beer or a good single malt
    "This is America - and here, right matters."

    - Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, Director for European Affairs for the United States National Security Council

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