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Thread: Hiking, Hunting, Fishing & Foraging

  1. #31
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    Re: Hiking, Hunting, Fishing & Foraging

    Quote Originally Posted by Lutherf View Post
    Most hog hunting is going to be done at a lot less than 200 yards and, frankly, the most practical use for a scope in a hog hunt will be light gathering as you'll be hunting at dusk more than anything. I actually use a Trijicon 1-4 AccuPoint on one of my ARs just because it gives me better visibility in waning light. If I plan on hunting anything at distances beyond 300 yards or so it's usually bigger game and I'm off the AR platform.
    It has been my experience that the overwhelming majority of all hunting is done at a lot less than 200 yards. I wouldn't necessarily be looking to change the AR platform, just the caliber of the round used. For example, if you want to drop large game at 500 yards you will need at least an .300 caliber, 180 grain round traveling at 3,150 feet per second. By the time that round reaches 500 yards it will still have 2,016 foot pounds of energy. It will also drop by 40" (assuming you had the rifle zeroed at 100 yards). You can buy an AR10 that is chambered for the .300 Win. Mag. caliber.

  2. #32
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    Re: Hiking, Hunting, Fishing & Foraging

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
    It has been my experience that the overwhelming majority of all hunting is done at a lot less than 200 yards. I wouldn't necessarily be looking to change the AR platform, just the caliber of the round used. For example, if you want to drop large game at 500 yards you will need at least an .300 caliber, 180 grain round traveling at 3,150 feet per second. By the time that round reaches 500 yards it will still have 2,016 foot pounds of energy. It will also drop by 40" (assuming you had the rifle zeroed at 100 yards). You can buy an AR10 that is chambered for the .300 Win. Mag. caliber.
    It's not that I HAVE to switch from the AR platform. It's just that I prefer bolt action for those longer shots.

  3. #33
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    Re: Hiking, Hunting, Fishing & Foraging

    Quote Originally Posted by Lutherf View Post
    It's not that I HAVE to switch from the AR platform. It's just that I prefer bolt action for those longer shots.
    After 28 years of use and abuse, I finally replaced my Mossberg Model 500 with an AR12 last year. It is my "camp gun" that I keep for bear/moose protection. Personally, I like the look of wood stocks over synthetic, but wood just can't stand up to the abuse over time. With the AR12 I gain durability and 3 extra rounds per load, plus it is much easier and faster to reload. The cost was also not much more than a similarly equipped Mossberg (extended tube magazine and rifled barrel). The AR12 is also a couple of pounds lighter the Mossberg, but that really isn't an issue since I never have to carry it very far.

    I still use my Remington Model 570 for hunting ptarmigan and grouse, however. The AR12 would make a crappy bird gun. No choke and the barrel is way too short. I've got a 28" barrel on my Remington.

  4. #34
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    Re: Hiking, Hunting, Fishing & Foraging

    If is currently moose season in Alaska, from September 1st until September 20th. I still have some caribou left over from last year's hunt, so I will not be hunting moose this season. Besides, my friend's off-road rig that we use to haul our moose out of the field whole, is currently not functioning. With two fires burning just to the north of me, it should force the moose further to the south. Into my neck of the woods.

    If one manages to walk across my property before September 20th, I may be tempted to take it. Otherwise we'll see what happens next year.

  5. #35
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    Re: Hiking, Hunting, Fishing & Foraging

    Anyone have any good wild game recipes they would like to share? I'll start. In this recipe I use caribou because of my location, but you can substitute white tail deer, elk, bison or any other large game animal. It even works well with beef.

    Caribou Wellington with Bordelaise Sauce

    Caribou Wellington
    2 to 3 pound braised caribou roast (see recipe below)
    2 to 3 cups of mushroom duxelle (see recipe below)
    1 cup of foie gras pt
    2 fresh eggs, beaten (for the egg wash)
    Dijon mustard
    Puff Pastry (see below)
    2 tablespoons of all-purpose floor
    Chopped parsley

    Heat the oven to 400F

    Place one of the large puff pastry sheets on a lightly floured chilled surface and with a pastry brush line the edges with the egg wash. Spread an even thin layer of the foie gras pt over the puff pastry, then spread the mushroom duxelle mixture over the foie gras pt. Place the braised caribou in the center of the puff pastry, and brush with Dijon mustard. Tightly wrap up the caribou in the puff pastry, tucking in the ends. Egg wash the top and all of the edges carefully. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

    Score and decorate the top of the puff pastry wrapped roast. Put a small hole in the top to allow steam to escape. If you have left over puff pastry you can fashion them into leaves or other decorative items, then with a little egg wash attach them to your wrapped roast to make it more attractive.

    Place the wrapped caribou roast in an uncovered, lightly buttered casserole dish, and place in the center of your oven. After about 40 minutes, use a meat thermometer. When the roast reaches between 125F and 130F, remove from the oven and let sit for another 15 minutes.

    Serves 4

    Braised Caribou
    2 to 3 pound caribou roast
    cup of clarified butter
    Salt and pepper to taste

    In a large frying pan, or baking dish, under high heat, brown the caribou on all sides in the butter to ensure a good seal. Since the roast will be sealed in puff pastry when baked, you do not want it to leak any of its juices into the pastry. Set aside and allow to cool to room temperature.

    Mushroom Duxelle
    3 tablespoons of butter
    1 pound of fresh Portobello mushrooms, cleaned, stemmed, and diced
    cup of minced shallots
    2 tablespoons of minced garlic
    1 cup of Port wine (Madera is a good substitute if port is not available)
    Salt and pepper to taste

    In a large frying pan melt the butter and add the diced mushrooms. Saut for 5 minutes, then add the shallots and garlic and continue to saut for another 5 minutes. Add the port and cook until almost all the liquid has been evaporated or incorporated into the mushrooms. Remove from the frying pan and let cool to room temperature.

    Bordelaise Sauce
    cup of minced shallots
    3 tablespoons of butter
    4 ounces of diced bone marrow
    1 sprig of fresh thyme
    cup of good red wine (cabernet sauvignon or merlot)
    1 cup of demi-glace (beef stock can be substituted)
    Salt and pepper to taste

    Melt the butter in a saut pan and sweat the shallots until they turn translucent, approximately 2 minutes under medium heat. Add the red wine and reduce by half. In a separate pan add the diced bone marrow and just enough water to cover. Bring to a moderate boil, then carefully drain the water and add the marrow to the red wine and shallots. Add the thyme and reduce again by half. Add the demi-glace (or beef stock) and simmer for another 5 minutes until the sauce begins to thicken.

    Note: If you substitute beef stock for the demi-glace, you may need to make a rue (equal parts of flour and butter, heated for 3 minutes) in order to thicken the sauce.

    Puff Pastry
    You can make it from scratch, if you like, but make sure you make enough to cover the entire roast. Or you can buy puff pastry frozen at just about any grocery store. If you buy the frozen puff pastry, you will need two sheets, which should be joined together at one edge using the egg wash. Make sure your puff pastry is not frozen before working with it. Puff pastry should always be kept chilled.

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