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Thread: The Remorse Fallacy

  1. #21
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    Re: The Remorse Fallacy

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    I think that most of the time when a criminal is on the stand apologizing for their actions it a "I'm only sorry I because I got caught" apology. Because if that individual was never caught I seriously doubt he would have any "remorse".
    I used to think on these same lines, but I've realized that sometimes people who do bad things don't really pause to think about it from the perspective of their victims. But, when confronted with how their actions have affected others, they do realize that what they did was evil.

    Not saying this happens in every case of a display of remorse. But sometimes good people do bad things because they don't think about what they're doing.

  2. #22
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    Re: The Remorse Fallacy

    Quote Originally Posted by ashurbanipal View Post
    I used to think on these same lines, but I've realized that sometimes people who do bad things don't really pause to think about it from the perspective of their victims. But, when confronted with how their actions have affected others, they do realize that what they did was evil.

    Not saying this happens in every case of a display of remorse. But sometimes good people do bad things because they don't think about what they're doing.
    That is true. I am sure that some people having time to reflect do have genuine remorse for their actions. But a lot of times its just a ploy to get out of jail or if they are facing a judge its a I'm sorry because I got caught apology.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

  3. #23
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    Re: The Remorse Fallacy

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    That is true. I am sure that some people having time to reflect do have genuine remorse for their actions. But a lot of times its just a ploy to get out of jail or if they are facing a judge its a I'm sorry because I got caught apology.
    Oh, sure--I agree. That's often what it is. Just not always. I like to think that people who are perceptive can tell the difference, and I'd also like to think it's usually appropriate to treat someone who is genuinely remorseful with some leniency. On the other hand, people who pull the "Oh, I'm so sorry" act because they got caught should receive double the sentence. I have more respect for criminals who at least own who they are than worms that try to weasel out after the fact.

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