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Thread: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

  1. #11
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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Dr. Hilda Molina, a former member the Cuban National Assembly, is one of Cuba's most distinguished scientists. She broke with the government on the issue of medical apartheid, the denial of medical care or medicine to Cubans while the same services are provided to dollar-paying foreign patients. Dr. Molina is founder of Havana's International Center for Neurological Restoration. She and her elderly mother were virtual hostages on the island for15 years, until recently that were permitted to travel abroad. Dr. Hilda Molina report “Cuban Medicine Today”, was smuggled out of the island, and published by Center for a Free Cuba, December 28, 2004
    Center for a Free Cuba - Cuban Medicine Today

    For an accurate picture of what the average Cuban undergoes in healthcare, please visit the harrowing pictures smuggled out of Cuba (at enormous peril) and posted on The Real Cuba. If a picture is normally worth a thousand worth then these are worth a million. The 20/20 program about healthcare in Cuba video:

    Great Healthcare in Cuba Sicko Style - YouTube.

    Hannity and Colmes' program about health care in Cuba for regular Cubans video:
    Cuba Healthcare, the Hospitals Michael Moore won't show 1 - YouTube

    “The man who assumed most of the risk during the filming and smuggling was Cuban dissident Dr. Darsi Ferrer, a medical doctor himself. Dr. Ferrer was also willing to talk on camera, narrating the video’s revelations. Dr Ferrer works in these Cuban hospitals, a daily witness to the truth that some prefer to ignore.”

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Physicians in Cuba are forced to work for a salary of $25 per month (650 pesos) which does not cover even their bare necessities. Many doctors quit the profession and seek jobs in the only industry that offers any chance for economic opportunity and access to dollars, the Cuban tourism industry. Because so many health workers are working overseas, and others have quit the profession, there is a shortage in Cuba.

    Many Cuban physicians in overseas missions defect to freedom. From news media reports:

    Cuban doctors in SA see red, News24.com. South Africa, February 10, 2003. Cuban doctors in SA see red

    Close to 200 doctors have absconded since 1996.
    Cuban saga takes new twist, DENVER ISAACS, nabibian.com, June 4, 2007
    http://allafrica.com/stories/200706041479.html

    The American Embassy has expressed surprise that a Namibian Government official has questioned the validity of special travel documents issued to 11 fugitive Cuban doctors in Namibia.

    Continues the chain of desertions of Cuban doctors in Bolivia
    LA NUEVA CUBA

    Bolivia
    La Nueva Cuba, October 5, 2006

    At least there are 70 Cuban doctors who have deserted in the past three months in Santa Cruz, in an attempt to recover "the freedom lost many years ago.”

    Cuban Doctors Manage to Defect Via Venezuela
    Latin American Herald Tribune - Cuban Doctors Manage to Defect Via Venezuela

    Around 500 Cuban doctors have defected to the United States while serving on aid missions in Venezuela.
    The doctors serving in those countries are essentially under surveillance all the time and any change in their plans not consistent with the orders given from Havana invariably lead to the involvement of police or paramilitary security forces. It is no wonder that many physicians in such missions defect to freedom. About 10,000 health workers, many of them physicians, have left Cuba in the last ten years.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/04/he...pagewanted=all

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    There are a total of 70,000 Cuban doctors. According to MINSAP 30,000 Cuban doctor’s work overseas and another 13,000 have left Cuba. The actual numbers of doctors in Cuba reach 27,000. Of those 10% quit their profession to work in more lucrative jobs, leaving only 24,300 working in their profession. The regime has acknowledged that there is a shortage of doctors and nurses in Cuba. On December 2007 the vice minister of public health, Joaquín García Salaberría, took the highly unusual step of admitting on Cuban television that there were shortages of doctors and nurses. The real per capita of doctors in Cuba is one doctor per 469 people.

    One example includes doctors from Cuba. According to this story in The New York Times, “6,000 medical professionals, many of them physicians, have left Cuba in the last six years.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/04/he...pagewanted=all

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    [
    B]Finding Cuba Outside of Cuba, My Nation Safeguarded by Its Exiles[/B]
    Yoani Sanchez: Finding Cuba Outside of Cuba, My Nation Safeguarded by Its Exiles

    Yoani Sanchez
    Posted: 03/30/2013 11:57 am

    I've found a Cuba outside of Cuba, I told a friend a few days ago. He laughed at my play on words, thinking I was trying to create literature. But no. In Brazil, a septuagenarian excitedly gave me a medal of the Virgin of Charity of Cobre. "I have not been back since I left in 1964," she confirmed as she handed me this little gem that had belonged to her mother. During my stay in Prague, a group of compatriots living there seemed to be more aware of what was happening in our country than many who vegetate, inside it, in apathy. Amid the tall buildings of New York a family invited me to their house and their grandmother made a "coconut flan" in the style of our traditional cuisine, so damaged on the island by the shortages and scarcities.

    Our diaspora, our exile, is conserving Cuba outside of Cuba. Along with their suitcases and the pain of distance, they have preserved pieces of our national history that were deleted from the textbooks with which several generations have been educated or rather, raised to be mediocre. I'm rediscovering my own country in each of these Cubans dispersed around the world. When I confirm what they have really accomplished, the contrast with what official propaganda tells me about them leaves me with an enormous sadness for my country. For all this human wealth that we have lost, for all this talent that has had to wash up outside our borders and for all the seeds that have germinated in other lands. How did we allow one ideology, one party, one man, to have felt the "divine" power to decide who could or could not carry the adjective "Cuban"?

    Now I have proof that they lied to me, they lied to us. Nobody has had to tell me, I can grasp it for myself on seeing all this Cuba that is outside of Cuba, an immense country that they have been safeguarding for us.
    Castro ran off the people who could make Cuba grow, the people the nation needed to feed everyone else. These same cast-off exiles through their own efforts, blood, sweat and tears, turned Miami into a world-class bustling metropolis, a paragon of International business success and prosperity.

    Cuban-Americans make up approximately 3.5% of the Hispanic population in the United States, yet own approximately 34% of Hispanic businesses. That savoir-faire, the initiative, the drive, the work-ethic and educational diligence, the determination to succeed exhibited by the Cuban exiles in America, could have been the bed-rock for a beautiful economically successful Cuban democratic republic. Instead, universal destitution, misery and starvation are Castro's legacies, his gifts to generations yet unborn.

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    The comparative study of the GDP among several countries by this article will bring into focus the catastrophic results of Castro’s regime over the Cuban economy. Here is the link:

    Comparative Study Of Cuba’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Based On Existing Statistical Data During The Republic And Today’s Communist System
    LA NUEVA CUBA

    Excerpts

    In 1958 the Cuban peso and the dollar circulated in Cuba on a par-basis. Between the 1960’s and the 1990’s, the inflation index (consumer price index, CPI) changed to 5.96 (4). In other words an item that cost $1.00 in 1958 will cost $5.96 in the year 2000. For example a gallon of milk that cost $0.47 in 1958 in the U.S. cost $2.80 in 2000.

    At the end of November 2001 the official exchange rate of the convertible Cuban peso (equivalent to the dollar) was 27 units of the Cuban peso in circulation. In the year 2001 Cuba’s monthly average was 230 pesos per capita, which at the exchange rate prevailing for that year would be equivalent to $8.52 per month. In 1958 Cuba’s monthly average was $110 per capita, 12.9 times larger than in 2001.

    The combined effect of the devalued Cuban peso with respect to the dollar, and the rate of inflation for the last 40 years (27x5.96) have been devastating to the standard of living experienced in Cuba from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. To remain at the same purchasing power, the average salary would have to be 161x110=17710 pesos today. Current per capita figures represent only 1.3% of the 1958 per capita.

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Cubans on the Island and Cubans Around the World: We Are All Just Cubans, Period
    Yoani Sanchez: Cubans on the Island and Cubans Around the World: We Are All Just Cubans, Period

    Yoani Sanchez
    Posted 04/01/2013

    Years ago, when I left Cuba for the first time, I was in a train leaving from the city of Berlin heading north. A Berlin already reunified but preserving fragments of the ugly scar, that wall that had divided a nation. In the compartment of that train, while thinking about my father and grandfather -- both engineers -- who would have given anything to ride on this marvel of cars and a locomotive, I struck up a conversation with the young man sitting directly across from me.

    After the first exchange of greetings, of mistreating the German language with "Guten Tag" and clarifying that "Ich spreche ein bisschen Deutsch," the man immediately asked me where I came from. So I replied with "Ich komme aus Kuba."

    As always happens after the phrase saying you come from the largest of the Antilles, the interlocutor tries to show how much he knows about our country. "Ah.... Cuba, yes, Varadero, rum, salsa music." I even ran into a couple of cases where the only reference they seemed to have for our nation was the album "BuenaVista Social Club," which in those years was rising in popularity on the charts.
    As George Gilder wrote in "The Spirit of Enterprise" 20 years ago:
    "Cuban-Americans are the most successful immigrants in the history of this nation of immigrants."

    This is something for which neither the Anglo establishment nor the black/Latino population will ever forgive Cuban-Americans; because they shattered the former's myth of superiority as well as disposing of all the excuses which the latter had for their endemic failures.

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    The Cuban presence in the United States goes back several centuries. The earliest settlers of the southeastern United States were Spanish explorers who lived in Cuba and launched their expeditions from the island.

    Before 1959 fewer than 35,000 Cubans Americans lived in the United States. By 2010 1.8 millions of Cuban Americans were living in the United States. About three-fourths of all Cuban Americans were born in Cuba, and most arrived in the United States after January 1, 1959, when Fidel Castro took control of Cuba’s government and established a Communist dictatorship. Cuban Americans do not regard themselves as typical immigrants, but rather as political exiles.

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Soon after Castro’s takeover in 1959, the number of Cuban immigrants rose sharply. From 1959 to 1962, more than 200,000 people left Cuba for the United States. Approximately 125,000 more left Cuba on so-called freedom flights, daily flights from Havana to Miami between 1965 and 1973. A similar number were transported to the United States in the summer of 1980 by the Mariel boat lift, an informal fleet of fishing boats and pleasure craft sent by Cuban exiles to pick up relatives from the Cuban port of Mariel. From 1959 onwards, thousands of other Cubans reached the United States in small boats and homemade rafts. Many others, above 100,000 thousands, lost their lives trying to escape from the island of Dr. Castro, in the shark infested waters, really and figuratively speaking, of the Straits of Florida.

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Cuban American are a very successful entrepreneurial people, which have allowed them to move from the lower ranks to reach today’s position. Among minorities, they have the highest college graduation rate and living standards, they are family oriented and religious people. Their success is a testament that the American dream is alive. In a matter of a few years they have succeed through hard work and a belief in the American dream to lead a happy, successful life. Many envious and hostile people haven’t welcome these new arrivals.

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    Re: Cuba’s bloggers are as sharp abroad as at home

    Amy Chau, who is a law professor at Yale launched to international fame in 2011 when The Wall Street Journal published an extract from her book, 'Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mom'. Published in the new book, 'The Triple Package” (Tiger Mom: Some cultural groups are superior | New York Post) which argues that eight groups of people are superior to others. These are, in no order of importance:

    • Jewish
    • Indian
    • Chinese
    • Iranian
    • Lebanese-Americans
    • Nigerians
    • Cuban exiles
    • Mormons


    Carlos Erie, Professor of History and Religious Studies at Yale University, wrote:

    Cuban exiles are among the eight groups identified as superior.

    I could be wrong about this, but I think that there is no other group of immigrants or subculture other than Cuban exiles that is so open to criticism, denigration, or open hatred or ridicule.

    Imagine anyone publicly denigrating any of the other seven groups singled out by Amy Chua: Jews, Chinese, Iranians, Indians, Lebanese, Nigerians, or even Mormons.

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