Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: In Defense of Presidents

  1. #11
    Sage
    AlbqOwl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Mexico
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 08:27 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    19,514
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    Quote Originally Posted by OrphanSlug View Post
    Another ready thread in the making.
    The founders envisioned a constitutional republic in which the people would assign the powers the central government would have rather than the other way around. The purpose of the central government was to provide the common defense for the nation, establish justice which they interpreted as recognizing and protecting the unalienable rights of the individual, and promote the general welfare meaning that there would be such laws, regulation, and policy that would facilitate the various states operating as one cohesive nation without doing violence to each other.

    In other words, the federal government would be strictly limited to its assigned authority and otherwise, the people were free to organize themselves into whatever sorts of societies they wished to have.

    Toward that purpose, they designed a Constitution that authorized a legislature that would not only allow the people equitable representation in the House of Representatives, but also even out the power by authorizing two senators so that the larger states would have no advantage over the smaller ones in the Senate. Both houses must concur before something can become law. The people's elected representatives were given sole authority to pass all laws and regulation including spending the people's money as well as giving consent to appointments, treaties, and going to war against any other nation.

    A judicial branch was authorized for the purpose of defending the Constitution and mediating differences of opinion as to what the laws states.

    And an executive branch, the President is commander in chief of the armed forces and is authorized to sign or veto such laws and regulation as were passed by Congress and to faithfully defend the Constitution. He is supposed to faithfully execute the laws and regulation passed by the Congress and signed into law. His power is limited re what laws will be in effect by the power of Congress to override his veto. His job is to make sure the government operates according to the Constitution and the responsibilities assigned to it by the Congress. Just as every committee needs a chairman, every business needs a boss, the President is CEO of the nation to administer the government according to policies established by the Constitution and the Board of Directors, i.e. the Congress.
    "I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it." --Benjamin Franklin 1776

  2. #12
    Filmmaker Lawyer Patriot
    Harshaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 10:55 PM
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    31,903

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    Quote Originally Posted by Grand Mal View Post
    Near as I can figure your system, the people elect the congress and the states elect the President.
    True at a high level. But the states leave the choice of who the state will vote for up to the people in the state. Not that it was always that way.
    It's not "tolerance" if you already approve of what you purport to "tolerate."

  3. #13
    Curmudgeon

    LowDown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Houston
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 01:50 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian
    Posts
    12,440
    Blog Entries
    11

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    Quote Originally Posted by JimHackerMP View Post
    What essentially was the purpose of the presidency?

    And, why does America have a PRESIDENT not a PRIME MINISTER?
    The Prime Minister is the head of Parliament. The President is the head of a separate branch of government, the Executive Branch.

    In a Parliamentary system there is just one governing body, the Parliament, and the executive functions of government are part of that. So the ministers of this and that are members of the Parliament.

    In the US system the Executive Branch is separate and has certain powers assigned to it, such as conduct of foreign affairs and leading the military. The powers of the branches of government are both contained and enabled by the other branches. So, the President can conduct war, but in order to do that he has to go to the Congress for funding. The President can negotiate treaties, but the Senate has to confirm them. The President can nominate judges for federal courts, but they have to be confirmed by the Senate. The Congress passes laws, but the President may veto them or has the power to enforce them, and so on.

    If the Parliament in the UK decided to sell Scotland to Uganda then a majority vote is all that would be required as I understand it. There would be a number of obstacles to that in the US system. The President might veto that, or the judiciary might rule it illegal, for example.

    Because of the concentration of power in one body, when government changes in the UK the change in government direction can be very dramatic. Not so much in the US.

    As you might have surmised, this is just off the top of my head.

    "The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule." --HL Mencken

  4. #14
    Professor
    JMR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Not over the edge yet
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 10:26 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Liberal
    Posts
    2,274

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    Quote Originally Posted by JimHackerMP View Post
    Yeah, I'm good at those

    I must admit however, that the parliamentary republics are more interesting to watch. Have any of you seen Prime Minister's Questions? They have it on C-SPAN now and then.
    I used to watch that years ago with Tony Blair. Absolutely amazing the command of policy and communication skills. The leader of a country should be put to the test occasionally by elected representatives. I cannot imagine our current leader could handle this situation. I am sure it would be Fake, Not Fair, and SAD.

  5. #15
    User
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Maryland, U.S.A.
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 02:40 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    58

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    PM's Questions and Minister's Questions end up training the cabinet in how to wiggle out of tight spots with slick answers, not in how to truthfully inform the House of Commons.

    Prime ministers are heads of parliaments. They are the heads of the governing party in parliament. However, with the need for a "national leader" figure in the age of mass media, prime ministers are no longer primus inter pares among their cabinet colleagues--they're far and away the most powerful figure among them. A minister owes, at least in part, his membership in the ministry to the prime minister, and the prime minister knows it. What looks like a more "democratic" form of government is actually lacking in checks and balances. Perhaps one day, both of the two main forms of democracy (parliamentary & presidential) will go by the wayside in favor of a better idea. But as for today, I'm glad to have a presidential government. Let the Canadians and the British keep their dictatorships.

  6. #16
    Advisor Mizzy22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:52 PM
    Gender
    Posts
    359

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    Quote Originally Posted by JimHackerMP View Post
    What essentially was the purpose of the presidency?

    And, why does America have a PRESIDENT not a PRIME MINISTER?
    President is Chief Executive

  7. #17
    User
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Maryland, U.S.A.
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 02:40 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    58

    Re: In Defense of Presidents

    Well, so is a prime minister, if not singularly then collectively with his/her cabinet.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •