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Thread: What is so hard about climate change?

  1. #441
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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by Visbek View Post
    You clearly have no idea what the term "baseline" means in this context.



    Because what you're saying is total bull****, based on what at this point I can only assume is a deliberate refusal to understand the truth.



    It is because, yet again, I'm not the one deciding it. E.g. actual climate scientists have called out UAH for its repeated methodological errors.



    I don't deny any facts. I display the distortions by deniers like you.

    It's astoundingly clear that you're not making any statements in good faith, and I've already wasted enough time on your denier garbage. Have a nice day.
    I am not actually making statements. I'm asking questions. Merely challenging the obviously ridiculous assertions made. As an example: mankind can control and direct the climate of the planet.

    You are making statements that raise questions. You are citing climate occurrences that are not supported by historical anecdotal accounts.

    Asking the obvious questions is what the Catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Warming Alarmists, like you, seem to never do. I find this to be concerning.

    Dismissing actual, empirical evidence and asserting consensus as being superior to actual science is silly.

    When methodology used by the "Climate Scientists" has obviously been changed to use the same data to construct a different record, then this actually happened.

    Why do you deny that it has been done?
    Last edited by code1211; 02-25-20 at 07:46 AM.
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  2. #442
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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
    During the last glacial period, lasting from 115,000 to 11,700 years ago, while most of Canada was covered by ice only the coastal areas of Alaska were covered in ice. The interior of Alaska (south of the Brooks Range and north of the Alaskan Range) remained ice-free and green.

    It only means that the oldest ice found in Alaska's glaciers thus far is 30,000 years old. That is when the glacier formed. It doesn't mean anything melted and then reformed again, it only means that 30,000 years ago was the very beginning of that particular glacier.

    Keep in mind that all glaciers are fed by snowfields. So 30,000 years ago something happened, like an increase in snowfall over an extended period, in that particular snowfield to create the new glacier.

    Attachment 67274365

    Source:
    Holocene coastal glaciation of Alaska - Quaternary Science Reviews, Volume 20, Issues 13, January 2001, pp. 449-461 (free preprint)
    That's interesting. Thank you.

    So it wasn't particularly the temperature, but rather the aridity that prevented the glaciation. Sounds like it was a cold, green desert.
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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by code1211 View Post
    That's interesting. Thank you.

    So it wasn't particularly the temperature, but rather the aridity that prevented the glaciation. Sounds like it was a cold, green desert.
    Yes, increased temperatures will cause much more snowfall on mountains. This will accumulate ice mass on places like Greenland and the remaining mountain glaciers of the world.

    When the next ice age comes along these high altitude glaciers will, very slowly, flow down and drain away because of the reduction in precipitation.

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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim the plumber View Post
    Yes, increased temperatures will cause much more snowfall on mountains. This will accumulate ice mass on places like Greenland and the remaining mountain glaciers of the world.

    When the next ice age comes along these high altitude glaciers will, very slowly, flow down and drain away because of the reduction in precipitation.
    I know people use the phrase glacial to describe a slow pace, but some historical references
    put glacier at a fairly rapid pace!
    The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850 - Brian Fagan - Google Books
    In 1642 the ice advanced by over a musket shot per day, even in August.
    If we assume a musket shot is ~40 meters, that is 14.6 kilometers in a year!!!

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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    I know people use the phrase glacial to describe a slow pace, but some historical references
    put glacier at a fairly rapid pace!
    The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850 - Brian Fagan - Google Books
    In 1642 the ice advanced by over a musket shot per day, even in August.
    If we assume a musket shot is ~40 meters, that is 14.6 kilometers in a year!!!
    I suspect that that would be on some days, not an average.

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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim the plumber View Post
    I suspect that that would be on some days, not an average.
    The way it was phrased, that was the minimum, but it is very likely something got lost in translation and retelling.
    Hyperbole is not a new Human trait!

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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by code1211 View Post
    That's interesting. Thank you.

    So it wasn't particularly the temperature, but rather the aridity that prevented the glaciation. Sounds like it was a cold, green desert.
    It was because the interior of Alaska was in a rain shadow. Precipitation from the coastal areas could not get over the Alaskan Range or the Brooks Range, which left interior Alaska glacier free. It was still much colder than it is today, and it gets very cold in the interior of Alaska (-60F during the Winter is common for Fairbanks, Delta Junction, Tok, and other portions of interior Alaska). It was just free of glaciers.

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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    I know people use the phrase glacial to describe a slow pace, but some historical references
    put glacier at a fairly rapid pace!
    The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850 - Brian Fagan - Google Books
    In 1642 the ice advanced by over a musket shot per day, even in August.
    If we assume a musket shot is ~40 meters, that is 14.6 kilometers in a year!!!
    The overwhelming majority of the ~198,000 glaciers on this planet are currently retreating, but there are some still advancing. The Hubbard Glacier is the world's largest non-polar tidewater glacier and it is currently advancing. The Hubbard Glacier terminus is nearly 9 miles (14 km) wide, and does not advance at the same rate across its entire width.

    Source:
    Glaciological and marine geological controls on terminus dynamics of Hubbard Glacier, southeast Alaska - Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 120, Issue 6, June 2015, pp. 1065-1081

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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim the plumber View Post
    Yes, increased temperatures will cause much more snowfall on mountains. This will accumulate ice mass on places like Greenland and the remaining mountain glaciers of the world.

    When the next ice age comes along these high altitude glaciers will, very slowly, flow down and drain away because of the reduction in precipitation.
    Thank you!

    In a previous series of posts on mountain glaciers some years back, I seem to recall a poster noting that the ice mass capping Kilimanjaro was shrinking. The decrease of ice was said to be due to increased aridity as well.

    Another example of real world science. Repeated empirical results supporting a justified conclusion or at least a well founded, reasonable expectation that might help create a test to falsify.

    There seems to be a stark contrast in this approach as it departs from the methodology of the Climastrologists.
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    Re: What is so hard about climate change?

    Quote Originally Posted by code1211 View Post
    Thank you!

    In a previous series of posts on mountain glaciers some years back, I seem to recall a poster noting that the ice mass capping Kilimanjaro was shrinking. The decrease of ice was said to be due to increased aridity as well.

    Another example of real world science. Repeated empirical results supporting a justified conclusion or at least a well founded, reasonable expectation that might help create a test to falsify.

    There seems to be a stark contrast in this approach as it departs from the methodology of the Climastrologists.
    I expect that the top of the highest mountain in Africa would not get any snowfall for years at a time. When the snow occaisionall falls it will stay there for a long time.

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