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Thread: Economics of Bio Fuel

  1. #11
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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by PoS View Post
    Soylent green?
    I'm surprised he hasn't posted already.

    Chemically speaking, you could build the entire plastics industry on algae slime. It's a logical way to develop some of the staple compounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    Algae and switchgrass, are effectively collecting solar energy at very low density, and converting a very small amount of that energy to a recoverable hydrocarbon.
    I think the more direct approach of simply making hydrocarbons from scratch is a more sustainable path.
    Start-up Sunfire’s e-fuels can decarbonise industries most addicted to fossil fuels | Clean Energy Wire
    Solar and wind energy at high density will create a problem for electrical grids, the current oil refineries have large scale grid connections
    for co generation, so could harvest the massive energy surpluses and store those surpluses as carbon neutral transport fuels.
    Current jets could fly across the ocean without any new CO2 emissions, (the fuel having been made with CO2 harvested from the environment).
    Gasoline cars could fill up with carbon neutral gasoline, and so on.
    As the process gets more efficient, the price where this technology becomes viable get closer.
    CO2 capture is certainly a plausible approach. However, there is still no convincing evidence that reducing CO2 has any real benefit. Climate science could be fixated on the wrong tree.
    Last edited by Jay59; 12-01-19 at 05:35 PM.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    I have a couple of questions for you, Tim... of that $2.50 a day how much of that is actually being spent on food? And do you know how much a serving of corn costs? Or a serving of sugar costs?

    I would estimate 70% to 80% generally.

    This is what poped out in a very brief search;


    Here’s How Much Food Really Costs for People Around the World

    The cost of food is going to influenced by many factors but the base price on the world markets is always going to be the start point. Other factors may add to thios or very occaisionally reduce it.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Waddy View Post
    We use about 1/3 of our corn production for fuel. That means growing high sugar corn, also known as sweet corn. Now pretty much ALL corn grown is high sugar. Why that matters is modern corn has almost NO nutritional value. Traditional corn had good sized protein kernel but high sugar corn has a very small, insignificant protein kernel. Additionally, high sugar corn does not pick up nutrients and minerals from the soil like traditional corn did. And since our soils (world wide) are depleted now that makes the problem even worse. Corn is now an empty calorie. About all it does is promote diabetes.

    BTW; modern bio-engineered crops of all types grow faster and bigger and are more pest resistant, but do not take up nutrients very well. Dumping large amounts of nitrogen on them increases the yield (top growth) even further, but does nothing to improve the depleted soil.

    In many poverty stricken nations (much of Africa and S. America) the land that could be used for domestic consumption crops is being used to grow export crops to pay back loans. In other countries population has exceeded the ability of that nation to feed itself. That is the case in Egypt, for instance. And importing caused huge increases in prices, because transport and processing imported bulk food is expensive. Which led to the "Arab Spring".
    Yes. The Arab Spring and the Syrian civil war both happened as a direct result in changes in US food policy.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay59 View Post
    I'm surprised he hasn't posted already.

    Chemically speaking, you could build the entire plastics industry on algae slime. It's a logical way to develop some of the staple compounds.


    CO2 capture is certainly a plausible approach. However, there is still no convincing evidence that reducing CO2 has any real benefit. Climate science could be fixated on the wrong tree.
    I meant soylent green as in the food, not the member here lol

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by PoS View Post
    I meant soylent green as in the food, not the member here lol
    That seems a modest proposal.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay59 View Post
    I'm surprised he hasn't posted already.

    Chemically speaking, you could build the entire plastics industry on algae slime. It's a logical way to develop some of the staple compounds.


    CO2 capture is certainly a plausible approach. However, there is still no convincing evidence that reducing CO2 has any real benefit. Climate science could be fixated on the wrong tree.
    The real benefits of air carbon capture, is not reducing CO2, but the concept that a small plant could be built (say in a shipping container)
    that would collect solar energy, and produce usable fuel from air and water, and perhaps supply a micro grid.
    The implications of this alone would be staggering, a very remote village could have electricity, Drinking water,
    and some amount of fuels for tractors.
    For people who are at a subsistence farming level, a little advantage would go a long way.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by 3leftsdoo View Post
    The oil companies are experimenting with algae as fuel.

    What could go wrong?

    I mean other than failing to be economically competitive, I don't see what could go "wrong."
    “personal attorney” to Individual-1, who at that point had become the President of the United States
    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    I don't know who [Individual-1] is and neither do you.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    I mean other than failing to be economically competitive, I don't see what could go "wrong."
    The number for economic viability of any technology is always changing and is relative to the alternatives
    that can perform the same function.
    Since Fossil fuels are finite resources, at some point the laws of supply and demand will push the prices up,
    but they have a ceiling, because of alternate technologies waiting in the wings.
    At some point one of the alternatives will be more economical than extracting and refining fossil oil.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by longview View Post
    The number for economic viability of any technology is always changing and is relative to the alternatives
    that can perform the same function.
    Since Fossil fuels are finite resources, at some point the laws of supply and demand will push the prices up,
    but they have a ceiling, because of alternate technologies waiting in the wings.
    At some point one of the alternatives will be more economical than extracting and refining fossil oil.
    Guy I quoted seemed to suggest something more dire, but I'm not sure what he could be referring to. Algae causing zombie apocalypse?
    “personal attorney” to Individual-1, who at that point had become the President of the United States
    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    I don't know who [Individual-1] is and neither do you.

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    Re: Economics of Bio Fuel

    Stop the ethanol madness [link]
    "Waste no more time arguing what a good man should be. Be one." --Marcus Aurelius

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