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Thread: Billionaire pays off Morehouse college student loans

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    Re: Billionaire pays off Morehouse college student loans

    Quote Originally Posted by beefheart View Post
    Its a historically black college.

    Jealousy is not a good look.
    So it would okay to have a whites-only scholarship at a historically white university (i.e. most of them)?

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    Re: Billionaire pays off Morehouse college student loans

    Quote Originally Posted by AmNat View Post
    So it would okay to have a whites-only scholarship at a historically white university (i.e. most of them)?
    If you went to school there and graduated, you would have gotten your loan paid off.
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    Re: Billionaire pays off Morehouse college student loans

    Quote Originally Posted by AmNat View Post
    So it would okay to have a whites-only scholarship at a historically white university (i.e. most of them)?
    On one hand, it is true the justification for those criteria is to counteract what presumably is ethnic discrimination, either at the level of the individual or the society. In this sense, it might be considered racist to single out minority groups for privileges (or sometimes even for disadvantages as in the SAT score evaluation procedure of some universities). However, you have to take into account that information, knowledge, and judgment aren't free. If your point is to help people who face uniquely difficult circumstances, you certainly would like to single out people who face challenges related to their financial history, that of their parent, the possibility of discriminatory attitudes by people in a position of authority, or even the disadvantages of certain cultures in fostering the right habits and attitudes to go through what tends to bring financial freedom in urban areas, just to name a few.

    The problem is that searching for who needs the most help and who faces the worst injustices is costly and it diverts resources away from helping people. If you wish to use the bulk of it to make some good and not squander it all on the decision process, you'll need to stop short of perfection and implement a reasonable, albeit imperfect plan. Black people, for example, tend to be poorer and tend to come from less favorable social environments. It is not entirely silly to use a coarse filter like that, even if it is obviously unfair to at least a handful of white students who grew up in tough circumstances as well. Ideally, personal circumstances should matter and the color of your skin shouldn't. But the reality of those choices is that you can quickly filter for variables that are hard to capture like aspects of one's culture by singling out the color of their skin, or their first language.


    My real problem with affirmative-action-like policies or these kinds of criteria is more with the general underlying attitude. I have an issue with the belief that the western world is a morally bankrupt civilization which oppresses minorities systematically for the greater benefit of straight, white, Christian men... You really need an intellectual to make such claims in the face of the advances this "morally bankrupt" and "oppressive" civilization has brought to the world, saving billions of lives in the process at the same time it made them longer and more comfortable. As far as I am concerned, if the argument is "social justice," your concerns would be somewhat correct. However, irrespective the dispute over the underlying motivation, the fact of the matter is that donations which really end up making a great impact in the lives of poor people and helps them get out of poverty is a good thing. That's the part which matters the most.
    Last edited by TheEconomist; 05-22-19 at 04:38 PM.

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