View Poll Results: What would be the fuel of the future?

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  • Oil

    2 6.67%
  • Coal

    0 0%
  • Biomass

    0 0%
  • Nuclear

    4 13.33%
  • Cold Fusion

    0 0%
  • Solar

    9 30.00%
  • Wind

    0 0%
  • Hydrogen

    5 16.67%
  • It's not invented yet

    4 13.33%
  • Other

    6 20.00%
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Thread: The fuel of the future

  1. #21
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Quote Originally Posted by Temporal View Post
    It's not a lie. I'm not trying to intentionally mislead anyone. I believe the technology to be potable, especially if it can be refined. The first electric generators were pieces of **** and they could not power very much at all. But they got millions in funding, which for the time was a lot.

    Tesla also worked on that side of things too. He wasn't just some fringe scientist. He helped with the advent of transformers and electric stations for amplifying currents. He just felt they were inefficient and there were better means.

    What Goshin said only goes to show how understated Tesla is as a scientist in our historical knowledge. We wouldn't have t.v's or radios without him, and much of the electronics technology today is based on his designs.

    Goshin... you can't find a telluric generator in operation but the original station in Britain is still there. It's being made into an historical monument, but all the equipment and apparatus are inside that could make it function again. You need multiple stations to increase energy potentials. He only made the one and it was to conduct research and to show something to his investors.

    I'm mostly just annoyed that it is being written off so easily, given that it barely had a chance to take off in the first place and has since been buried.
    I tend to react badly to claims that we have the technology to produce "free" or "unlimited" energy. I was once intrested in all this stuff, did my research and found it to all be overhyped, overstated, or outright fraud. Here's a link to a long conversation I had with someone about free energy devices: http://http://www.debatepolitics.com...l-party-2.html

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  2. #22
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    For power generation, I like the idea of osmotic power combined with solar, especially for Australia, where all the important cities are located where rivers meet the sea, and it's sunny for most of the year, failing that, just go with fusion. However, the fuel of the future that will be used to power all the flying brothels will be the urine of genetically engineered midgets.
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  3. #23
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Quote Originally Posted by Goshin View Post
    I tend to react badly to claims that we have the technology to produce "free" or "unlimited" energy. I was once intrested in all this stuff, did my research and found it to all be overhyped, overstated, or outright fraud. Here's a link to a long conversation I had with someone about free energy devices: http://http://www.debatepolitics.com...l-party-2.html
    It's not a free energy device. A free energy device would look like a perpetual motion machine or something along those lines. Telluric currents are not free energy. It is electrical energy that is the byproduct of the earth's geological processes and its magnetic field. We use some manner of magnets in all of our electronics today. Their polarization helps to transport energy, but the force of the magnets themselves comes from our own earth's field.

    It's not free energy. It's just energy that is being given off of our planet all around us. Much like how solar panels take energy from the sun - which is not "free energy" either because the sun is a continuous fusion reaction - telluric generators take energy from the earth and direct it elsewhere.

  4. #24
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Goshin, here are some links:
    Telluric current - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And here is a BBC documentary about him:
    Veoh - (Documentary) Tesla_Master of Lightning (2000).avi

  5. #25
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Quote Originally Posted by Temporal View Post
    It's not a lie. I'm not trying to intentionally mislead anyone. I believe the technology to be potable, especially if it can be refined. The first electric generators were pieces of **** and they could not power very much at all. But they got millions in funding, which for the time was a lot.

    Tesla also worked on that side of things too. He wasn't just some fringe scientist. He helped with the advent of transformers and electric stations for amplifying currents. He just felt they were inefficient and there were better means.

    What Goshin said only goes to show how understated Tesla is as a scientist in our historical knowledge. We wouldn't have t.v's or radios without him, and much of the electronics technology today is based on his designs.

    Goshin... you can't find a telluric generator in operation but the original station in Britain is still there. It's being made into an historical monument, but all the equipment and apparatus are inside that could make it function again. You need multiple stations to increase energy potentials. He only made the one and it was to conduct research and to show something to his investors.

    I'm mostly just annoyed that it is being written off so easily, given that it barely had a chance to take off in the first place and has since been buried.
    Telluric current is a low voltage current that isn't physically capable of meeting our power generation needs any more than a hamster wheel is. You can create the most efficient setup possible and still not even be close to the 22 gigawatts needed.

  6. #26
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Quote Originally Posted by rathi View Post
    Telluric current is a low voltage current that isn't physically capable of meeting our power generation needs any more than a hamster wheel is. You can create the most efficient setup possible and still not even be close to the 22 gigawatts needed.
    This is pretty impressive.

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  7. #27
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    In the near future (say within the next century) it's going to be a big jumbled blend of stuff. Most of our electricity will probably be a blend of nuclear, wind, solar, and hydroelectric. Cars will probably be powered by a blend of batteries, hydrogen, and biomass (ethanol and biodiesel). Trains will most likely be the same. More and more ships may go nuclear, and it's possible that planes could go that route as well.

    Even further down the line, nuclear power will at some point stop being an option, since we'll run out of radioactive elements to use. At that point, fusion may or may not be a realistic option. I would expect to see a much higher percentage of solar, wind, and hydroelectric though, since those resources are basically unlimited. As for cars, either electric or hydrogen will win out. Both have their pluses and minuses, and it's hard to say which will end up winning. Trains will probably be electric, and may very likely replace airplanes at some point down the line.
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  8. #28
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    molten_dragon, you are lucky you are not made of salt. Just kidding.

    Anyway, it's encouraging that people are constantly trying new ways to get energy.

  9. #29
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Quote Originally Posted by Canell View Post
    What would be the primary (most used) fuel of the future?
    What's your say?
    What I would like to do is what Brad Pitt is doing in Louisiana but expand it more throughout the nation.

    I would like to have a mandate that states that all new low-income housing be built with solar panels. This will help reduce the energy costs to low-income earners and even possibly allow them to get paid for contributing energy to the grid.

    So solar power is good but only for static receivers of energy - homes, offices, other buildings, and the like.

    For transportation, it depends on the type.

    For large urban areas we should develop better public transportation where it needs to be. Also, electric cars will be better for the city.

    Suburbs and rural areas will likely keep gasoline cars and trucks because of their distance from urban areas. However, something needs to be done to allow the use of fuel to be used more efficiently. For most places, this may involve expansion of highways, but it could also involve public transportation routes from suburbs to urban areas. For future cities, it may involve having residential and commercial areas developed closer together for shorter commuting.

    For agricultural purposes, diesel will be the only fuel we use for agricultural and industrial equipment. Batteries won't keep heavy equipment running long enough for it to be worthwhile, so petro is the only way those things can go.

    The future of energy consumption isn't going to be on any one type that will be a catch-all for everybody, which is what oil currently is. Rather, the future of energy consumption is going to be multi-tiered, with specific types of energy optimized for specific types of uses.
    Also, we need to legalize recreational drugs and prostitution.

  10. #30
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    Re: The fuel of the future

    Quote Originally Posted by Temporal View Post
    I'm sorry, apparently I didn't express myself well. I am not questioning that telluric currents exist, nor denying that Tesla was a genius in his time. The Earth is basically a big revolving magnet, of COURSE there are electrical currents. What I am questioning is that telluric currents can produce useful amounts of electricity vs the investment/infractructure needed, let alone enough to meet humanity's energy needs. If there is any evidence that this is so, why isn't someone researching the idea? Given that we're desperately casting about for alternate energy, you'd think SOMEONE would fund such research if it showed any real promise.

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