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Thread: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

  1. #11
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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
    Well, compared to the multi-cultural mess some of us laughingly call the us the chinese would certainly qualify as both unified and nationalistic. These are two ingredients for a very successful society, and it shows.
    I would argue that the demographics of the US are far more favorable than the demographics of China, in the long term. The US has always been a melting pot, and it's served us well. We've attracted people from all over the world, and they've brought with them some of the best ideas from their own cultures (and sent some of the best US ideas back to their homeland). Our diversity means that American businesses dominate the international markets, since Americans have roots (and therefore business contacts) in every part of the planet. China, by contrast, suffers from some huge weaknesses: The inability to excel in any truly multinational business due to lack of a diaspora, a population that mostly speaks no language other than Chinese, a tendency towards xenophobia, and an ethnocentric focus on China when looking at international business, economics, or politics.

    I don't mean to badmouth China, because the country certainly does have many strengths...but I don't think their homogeneity is one of them. There is something to be said for diversity.
    Last edited by Kandahar; 01-23-11 at 12:38 PM.
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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Really it depends. For example, if we are talking about it in the context of Chinese-Americans or in terms of Asia as a whole, then yes Chinese is an ethnicity.
    "And in the end, we were all just humans, drunk on the idea that love, only love, could heal our brokenness."

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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    The correct term would be "Han Chinese," if you are talking about ethnicity.

    Otherwise "Chinese" has cultural and national connotations.

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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post
    ...The US has always been a melting pot,...
    Not any more it isn't. The idea of assimilation created the melting pot and created a unique people. But assimilation is dead as an idea in this country. The American Left rejects assimilation and embraces multiculturalism. Multiculturalism killed assimilation and unity. The American Left wants a mixing bowl instead of a melting pot. Unity dies that way.

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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Di Salvo View Post
    Not any more it isn't. The idea of assimilation created the melting pot and created a unique people. But assimilation is dead as an idea in this country. The American Left rejects assimilation and embraces multiculturalism. Multiculturalism killed assimilation and unity. The American Left wants a mixing bowl instead of a melting pot. Unity dies that way.
    I see. So the American Left was against integration?

    The truth is, people tend to self-segregate themselves into communities based on race/color/ethnicity and people who have a common background with them, and this serves as a barrier to interaction with people of different backgrounds. Any attempt by an outside force (the government) to integrate schools, housing communities, etc. is seen as oppressive and unwanted intrusion into personal lives (and I definitely don't blame anyone who thinks this way, because it is).

    We have a mixing bowl instead of a melting pot because sociologically speaking, people tend to interact and be with those who have something culturally in common with them. This has nothing to do with right or left. And what is it exactly that makes unity and assimilation more desirable than multiculturalism?

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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Di Salvo View Post
    Not any more it isn't. The idea of assimilation created the melting pot and created a unique people. But assimilation is dead as an idea in this country. The American Left rejects assimilation and embraces multiculturalism. Multiculturalism killed assimilation and unity. The American Left wants a mixing bowl instead of a melting pot. Unity dies that way.
    Assimilation and multiculturalism have always gone hand in hand, and I don't see any evidence that recent immigrants today are less assimilated than their counterparts in the past. People who want to come here generally want to become Americans, but the first generation (and perhaps the second) retains some aspects of their own country's culture as well. Furthermore, immigrants often come with a network of contacts in their home countries. For example, that's how India became the IT hub of the world; Indian-American engineers started outsourcing work to people they knew back in India. This was beneficial to both of our countries, as well as the individual workers.

    The diversity of the United States is a huge part of what makes our economy vibrant, and a huge weakness in homogeneous societies like China or Japan.
    Last edited by Kandahar; 01-23-11 at 12:47 PM.
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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by StillBallin75 View Post
    ...And what is it exactly that makes unity and assimilation more desirable than multiculturalism?
    Unity permits a country to act effectively both domestically and internationally. The lack of unity leads to strife and paralysis. America is paralyzed for many reasons, but the lack of a shared identity and consciousness has been a major component in the crippling of America.

    America is in someways like France in 1870. So riven with division that it could not defend itself effectively agains their enemy in the Franco-Prussian War. France was paralyzed like America today.

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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post
    Assimilation and multiculturalism have always gone hand in hand, and I don't see any evidence that recent immigrants today are less assimilated than their counterparts in the past. People who want to come here generally want to become Americans, but the first generation (and perhaps the second) retains some aspects of their own country's culture as well. Furthermore, immigrants often come with a network of contacts in their home countries. For example, that's how India became the IT hub of the world; Indian-American engineers started outsourcing work to people they knew back in India. This was beneficial to both of our countries, as well as the individual workers.

    The diversity of the United States is a huge part of what makes our economy vibrant, and a huge weakness in homogeneous societies like China or Japan.
    This is sophistry.

  9. #19
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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post
    I would argue that the demographics of the US are far more favorable than the demographics of China, in the long term. The US has always been a melting pot, and it's served us well. We've attracted people from all over the world, and they've brought with them some of the best ideas from their own cultures (and sent some of the best US ideas back to their homeland). Our diversity means that American businesses dominate the international markets, since Americans have roots (and therefore business contacts) in every part of the planet. China, by contrast, suffers from some huge weaknesses: The inability to excel in any truly multinational business due to lack of a diaspora, a population that mostly speaks no language other than Chinese, a tendency towards xenophobia, and an ethnocentric focus on China when looking at international business, economics, or politics.

    I don't mean to badmouth China, because the country certainly does have many strengths...but I don't think their homogeneity is one of them. There is something to be said for diversity.
    The melting pot paradigm did serve us well. Different races, ethnicities contributing to a common culture. We no longer have that. The democratic party has been far too successful in their use of identity politics. We are now a deeply divided nation. I feel we will remain so.
    He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire. ~ Winston Churchill

  10. #20
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    Re: Is Chinese an ethnicity?

    Quote Originally Posted by StillBallin75 View Post
    I see. So the American Left was against integration?

    The truth is, people tend to self-segregate themselves into communities based on race/color/ethnicity and people who have a common background with them, and this serves as a barrier to interaction with people of different backgrounds. Any attempt by an outside force (the government) to integrate schools, housing communities, etc. is seen as oppressive and unwanted intrusion into personal lives (and I definitely don't blame anyone who thinks this way, because it is).

    We have a mixing bowl instead of a melting pot because sociologically speaking, people tend to interact and be with those who have something culturally in common with them. This has nothing to do with right or left. And what is it exactly that makes unity and assimilation more desirable than multiculturalism?
    It's called balkinization. It can lead to bad consequences. This is an example. History is repleat with them.

    He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire. ~ Winston Churchill

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