View Poll Results: is access to the internet a fundamental right?

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Thread: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

  1. #21
    Banned Goobieman's Avatar
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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    No, because bearing arms could mean picking up a stick off the side of the street and there are very few people who could not find a weapon of some type, such as a crowbar or kitchen knife. The constitution does not specifically talk about guns.
    Gee... how did I know that your response would be "oh, no, that's different".


    I don't agree.
    That just means you are wrong.

  2. #22
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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    Gee... how did I know that your response would be "oh, no, that's different".


    That just means you are wrong.
    You have your opinion and I have mine. Normally we tend to get in these long fights that don't go anywhere, so I will let you have the last say in this thread.

  3. #23
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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    You have your opinion and I have mine.
    Yes.
    Difference is, mine is supportable thru sound reasoning and yours is not.

  4. #24
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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar View Post
    I'm not sure what you're asking. ALL of our rights exist only because the government created a law (or a constitutional amendment) giving them to us. Maybe I could give a better answer if you explained which of our fundamental rights you don't think fall into that category.
    I would say any 'fundamental' right exists because we live. That's how I define a fundamental right. A right that you have merely because you live. You have a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The government doesn't give these rights. It protects them. The government can protect your right to have internet, but it cannot 'give' it to you. So I counter-challenge you to explain how any fundamental right is given to us by the government. I cannot think of one.

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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by fredmertz View Post
    I would say any 'fundamental' right exists because we live. That's how I define a fundamental right. A right that you have merely because you live. You have a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The government doesn't give these rights. It protects them. The government can protect your right to have internet, but it cannot 'give' it to you. So I counter-challenge you to explain how any fundamental right is given to us by the government. I cannot think of one.
    A person can derive their idea of rights from any source they please. In your case, I am guessing you are looking at it from the lense of 1700s enlightenment. However, ultimately, what a person can or cannot do is determined by law, not philosophy. You can say that government protects rights (which morally, could be a correct argument) and another person says that government gives rights (which legally, could be a correct argument) and ultimately, those two arguments have nothing to do with each other as I think you are talking about morality and Kandahar is talking about legality.
    Last edited by tacomancer; 07-02-10 at 03:44 PM.

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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    A person can derive their idea of rights from any source they please.
    Not if they want their argument to that effect to carry any weight.

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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    A person can derive their idea of rights from any source they please. In your case, I am guessing you are looking at it from the lense of 1700s enlightenment. However, ultimately, what a person can or cannot do is determined by law, not philosophy. You can say that government protects rights (which morally, could be a correct argument) and another person says that government gives rights (which legally, could be a correct argument) and ultimately, those two arguments have nothing to do with each other as I think you are talking about morality and Kandahar is talking about legality.
    legality should always be based in morality and in philosophy. If it is philosophically or morally unsound, it doesn't belong in the law. And I agree they can derive their idea of rights from any source they please. I derive my idea of rights from the constitution. I am an American afterall. And I don't think any law should be created outside the morals and philosophy of the constitution as it was intended (and often times, that intent was intently left open for debate). And if one is needed, then the constitution itself should be changed to allow for it.

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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Rights can't be taken away. Privileges can. This is just a dumbed-down version. In addition, a right is only a right when it doesn't negate another's right.

    Having the internet is simply nothing more than a privilege. There is no way you can justify the assumption that anyone is entitled to have the internet, no matter what. You create a very slippery slope if you even attempt to justify it.

  9. #29
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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
    Rights can't be taken away. Privileges can.
    Similarly, rights are not given, provileges are.
    If you have something -- like internet access -- only because the goveremt gave it to you, you are enjoying a priviliege, not a right.
    Nothing entitles you to the means to exercise your rights.

  10. #30
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    Re: Access to the internet - a fundamental right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
    Rights can't be taken away. Privileges can. This is just a dumbed-down version. In addition, a right is only a right when it doesn't negate another's right.

    Having the internet is simply nothing more than a privilege. There is no way you can justify the assumption that anyone is entitled to have the internet, no matter what. You create a very slippery slope if you even attempt to justify it.
    I agree w/ your first statement. And to clarify, adding internet as an entitlement isn't creating a slippery slope. It's extending an already existing slippery slope on which we are sliding.... and unfortunately gaining speed.

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