View Poll Results: How valuable is common sense?

Voters
19. You may not vote on this poll
  • It is extremely important to the exclusion of other methods

    2 10.53%
  • It is very valuable and more important than other methods

    8 42.11%
  • It is no more valuable than other methods of data synthesis (such as science)

    5 26.32%
  • It is less valuable than other methods

    3 15.79%
  • It is of little to no value

    1 5.26%
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36

Thread: How valuable is common sense

  1. #21
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    The Beautiful Yadkin Valley
    Last Seen
    09-26-10 @ 08:47 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    2,219

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    3 out of 8 posters held that sentiment.
    Ah! Now I see says the blind man. Admittedly I did not survey individual responses and tally them, nor do I feel the need to do so, as the point is minor and "several" can be substituted for "most" in my argument without affecting its strength.

  2. #22
    Doesn't go below juicy
    tacomancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cleveland
    Last Seen
    05-20-16 @ 02:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    31,781

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Man View Post
    Ah! Now I see says the blind man. Admittedly I did not survey individual responses and tally them, nor do I feel the need to do so, as the point is minor and "several" can be substituted for "most" in my argument without affecting its strength.
    Main Entry: 1sev·er·al
    Pronunciation: \ˈsev-rəl, ˈse-və-\
    Function: adjective
    Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin separalis, from Latin separ separate, back-formation from separare to separate
    Date: 15th century

    1 a : separate or distinct from one another <federal union of the several states> b (1) : individually owned or controlled : exclusive <a several fishery> — compare common (2) : of or relating separately to each individual involved <a several judgment> c : being separate and distinctive : respective <specialists in their several fields>
    2 a : more than one <several pleas> b : more than two but fewer than many <moved several inches> c chiefly dialect : being a great many
    Main Entry: 1most
    Pronunciation: \ˈmōst\
    Function: adjective
    Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mę̄st; akin to Old High German meist most, Old English māra more — more at more
    Date: before 12th century

    1 : greatest in quantity, extent, or degree <the most ability>
    2 : the majority of <most people>
    Several could mean most, but it could also be fewer than most. So, I disagree that it does not affect the strength of the argument as several is less precise a number and could mean anything, really.

    However, I will happily accept your backtracking as you admitting that you were wrong.
    Last edited by tacomancer; 06-23-10 at 09:05 PM.

  3. #23
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Nun-ya-dang Bidness
    Last Seen
    02-19-11 @ 03:14 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    3,981

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    Well according to wikipedia

    <Snip>

    Which seems like a pretty good definition.
    I think that "TheMark" was trying to make the case that the factual basis for what is known as each persons "common sense" varies between person to person.

    Some people (because of that variance) have more "common sense" than others.

  4. #24
    Sage
    UtahBill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Utah
    Last Seen
    12-03-17 @ 01:39 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    17,687

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    I prefer good judgement, but would accept common sense as long as it doens't include blindly accepting common belief...
    Oracle of Utah
    Truth rings hollow in empty heads.

  5. #25
    Cheese
    Aunt Spiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sasnakra
    Last Seen
    09-10-16 @ 06:10 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    28,433

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    I question its value because it tends to rely on assumptions and personal observations vs what I consider to be more objective forms of data gathering and synthesis, such as science. What is your opinion?
    Common sense (to me) seems to serve a more important role when science, data gathering and logic aren't possible or present.

    Logic and common sense, however, sometimes are quite related - and maybe even dependent on each other. If you are without common-sense, your logic suffers. If you are without logic, your common sense suffers.

    Like: Yesterday I told my son the other day to get some lunch meat from the fridge so I could lure a dog out from under the deck. An adult - or other child (like my daughter) would have looked for the lunch meat and, if there was none, would have considered dog-edible suitable options: hot-dog, cheese. . .

    My son, because of his underdeveloped common sense due to their developmental disorder, brought me a frozen package of bologna from the freezer instead of something I could actually feed to the dog. he didn't see lunch meat in the fridge, so naturally, the freezer seemed to be the next best choice.

    Logic, without common sense, is vapid

    My oldest son has a more extreme issue when it comes to his lack. He, also, functions without common sense - but is very heavy on logic. Thus, his actions are to the extreme opposite of his brother's - purely lacking common sense but still functioning within a logical reason.
    If I asked him to bring me lunch meat from the fridge, if he didn't see it, he would have brought me something akin to it - his reasoning is: "I see no lunch meat, I do see meat, I do see lunch condiments." Since the dogs don't eat a "lunch" the only logical conclusion to him would have been to get something related to "human lunch." So bread, mayonnaise or jelly would have been his likely choice.

    It really depends on who you're talking about, the situation they're in, and if they have a fully developed 'common sense' 'logic' or a balance of both.
    A screaming comes across the sky.
    It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now.
    Pynchon - Gravity's Rainbow

  6. #26
    Guru
    tlmorg02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Louisville, Ky
    Last Seen
    07-23-15 @ 11:48 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Liberal
    Posts
    3,347

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Common sense is needed to interpret the data that science and logic provide.

  7. #27
    free market communist
    Gardener's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Last Seen
    09-30-17 @ 12:27 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    26,661

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    I see common sense a little differently than some, perhaps, as I view it a bit in terms of being that innate barometer people possess to one degree or another that allows them to sort through b.s. in order to find the truth of the matter.

    The parable of the emperors new clothes is an illustration of common sense.
    "you're better off on Stormfront discussing how evil brown men are taking innocent white flowers." Infinite Chaos

  8. #28
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    The Beautiful Yadkin Valley
    Last Seen
    09-26-10 @ 08:47 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    2,219

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by megaprogman View Post
    Several could mean most, but it could also be fewer than most. So, I disagree that it does not affect the strength of the argument as several is less precise a number and could mean anything, really.

    However, I will happily accept your backtracking as you admitting that you were wrong.
    No, my argument is still valid. That's why you failed to address it and instead choose to focus on this unrelated issue; a classic Red Herring.

  9. #29
    Doesn't go below juicy
    tacomancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cleveland
    Last Seen
    05-20-16 @ 02:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    31,781

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Man View Post
    No, my argument is still valid. That's why you failed to address it and instead choose to focus on this unrelated issue; a classic Red Herring.
    Personally, I do not believe that your argument is valid and this is why I did not address it. I will continue to not do so unless there is a time I feel that it is valid. You are free to use that to prove whatever point you feel you must make if it makes you feel better, as it provides no harm to me for you to do so. However, I did wish to point the flaw in your reasoning as those sorts of things irritate me in general. You misused words in your argument, I pointed it out, you backtracked, case closed.

    Overall though, the people on this forum are quite capable of posting their thoughts about the matter if they wish to do so and are quite able to provide their own take, even if it has little to do with mine. I do not think they need you to be their champion. But as I posted in the last paragraph, if you feel good doing it, go ahead.

  10. #30
    Sporadic insanity normal.


    The Mark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Last Seen
    Today @ 04:54 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    19,736

    Re: How valuable is common sense

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuz Life View Post
    I think that "TheMark" was trying to make the case that the factual basis for what is known as each person’s "common sense" varies between person to person.

    Some people (because of that variance) have more "common sense" than others.
    That's an interesting idea, but I was actually describing what I personally thought of as the definition of "common sense".

    It was apparently not entirely in step with the Wikipedia definition.

    But that brings up an interesting thought.

    Perhaps what many people consider "common sense" is not actually such, or perhaps what Wikipedia defines as "common sense" is something else entirely?

    Education.

    Sometimes I think we're alone. Sometimes I think we're not. In either case, the thought is staggering. ~ R. Buckminster Fuller

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •