View Poll Results: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

Voters
20. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    18 90.00%
  • No

    2 10.00%
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

  1. #11
    Familiaist


    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    North Carolina
    Last Seen
    11-16-16 @ 09:36 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    7,470

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    Not only should it be taught more thoroughly but the intentions of those who wrote it should be taught as well.
    But doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of the vagueness of the document? So it can be applied to future generations? If we focus more on the intention, then we limit the application.

    I think there are great stories from that era which would be good to teach children-- courage.
    "I do not underestimate the ability of fanatical groups of terrorists to kill and destroy, but they do not threaten the life of the nation. Whether we would survive Hitler hung in the balance, but there is no doubt that we shall survive al-Qa'ida." -- Lord Hoffmann

  2. #12
    Sage
    jamesrage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A place where common sense exists
    Last Seen
    Today @ 06:25 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    31,073

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Arch Enemy View Post
    But doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of the vagueness of the document? .
    Who said it had to be vague, did the authors say they wanted it to be vague?Besides that if we are going to arguing what is and isn't constitutional then it should be the authors of the bill of rights who are the authority on what is and isn't constitutional.

    So it can be applied to future generations? If we focus more on the intention, then we limit the application.
    Constitutional rights apply today just as they did back then when our founding forefathers wrote it. The fact we are more technologically advanced than our forefathers is irrelevant. The right to speech,freedom of religion, the right to remain silent, a well regulated militia ,the right to addresses grievances with the government, the right to keep and bears without it being infringed and many other rights apply today just as it did back then when the constitution was written. If you want a change to the constitution then it should be amended not ignored or blatantly misinterpreted.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

  3. #13
    Sage
    Dav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Last Seen
    04-16-16 @ 02:36 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    5,539

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Arch Enemy View Post
    But doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of the vagueness of the document? So it can be applied to future generations?
    Wait, what? Its intentions are irrelevant because it was intended to be vague in order to apply to future generations?

  4. #14
    User Eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Last Seen
    11-18-09 @ 06:33 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    20

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    Constitutional rights apply today just as they did back then when our founding forefathers wrote it. The fact we are more technologically advanced than our forefathers is irrelevant. The right to speech,freedom of religion, the right to remain silent, a well regulated militia ,the right to addresses grievances with the government, the right to keep and bears without it being infringed and many other rights apply today just as it did back then when the constitution was written. If you want a change to the constitution then it should be amended not ignored or blatantly misinterpreted.

    I agree James. Back in the 1700's, Al Gore hadn't yet invented the internet, and without TV and Radio, that meant there were no means of mass communication to the public. Yet, today, the First Amendment protects every single broadcaster in America. Or what about the Fourth Amendment? Back then there weren't any telephones, yet today the police (Generally) need a warrant to listen in on your calls. Also, there were no helicopters or satellites to take images of your home, yet today you are protected from both of those by.. yep, the constitution.

    The Constitution was designed carefully by arguably the smartest men in American History. They designed it to be difficult to change/amend. The founders weren't shooting for vague, that's why today all the Congressmen, the President, etc. all take an oath to Protect and Defend the Constitution of the United States of America.
    Last edited by Eric; 11-10-09 at 01:27 AM.

  5. #15
    Global Moderator
    The Truth is out there.
    Kal'Stang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bonners Ferry ID USA
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    32,868
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    It never ceases to amaze me how many people don't know the constitution, and what it stands for. Do you believe it should be more aggressively taught in schools?

    -- (For example; taught each year, rather than just the 1-2 it's taught in now.)
    Lets see...how to put this.....


    YES!

    It is sad and disgusting that people don't know squat about the very document that literally defines our country.
    I have an answer for everything...you may not like the answer or it may not satisfy your curiosity..but it will still be an answer. ~ Kal'Stang

    My mind and my heart are saying I'm in my twenties. My body is pointing at my mind and heart and laughing its ass off. ~ Kal'Stang

  6. #16
    Baby Eating Monster
    Korimyr the Rat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Laramie, WY
    Last Seen
    11-23-17 @ 02:02 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    18,709
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    No, it shouldn't. The Constitution only means whatever the lawmakers want it to mean, and only occasionally does the Supreme Court step in and say no, the Constitution means what they want it to mean. And, quite frankly, attempting to follow the interpretation of the Constitution that is being suggested here would be disastrous.

    There would be far better ways of accomplishing the social goals being proposed here, and I even agree with some of those goals. Most of them, unfortunately, would require the people proposing them to stop looking down their goddamned noses at public education and start using it in the same fashion that their opponents have.

  7. #17
    Banned Goobieman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Seen
    03-22-15 @ 02:36 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    17,343

    Re: Should the Constitution be taught more thoroughly?

    Quote Originally Posted by pro-bipartisan View Post
    Yeah, the elastic clause and supremacy clause are intended to restrict government power...
    The elastic clause does nothing other than give Congress the power to pass the laws necessary to exercise the powers given to it.
    A decent education on the subject would have taught that....

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •