View Poll Results: Do white people have an opinion on ethnic hairstyles

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  • As long as said ethnic hairstyle looks kept, I don't care

    52 37.68%
  • I think ethnic hairstyles such as afros and dreadlocks are unprofessional

    11 7.97%
  • I think straight hair looks better on black women

    9 6.52%
  • I've never even gave it a thought

    74 53.62%
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Thread: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

  1. #101
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mika-El View Post
    I am a man I know sweet f..all about this subject. But I can tell you as a white guy (actually pinkish-green/grey) my wife who I have been married to for twenty years who is Jamaican always is complemented by white women on her locks.

    Me I am losing my hair. I only seem to grow it in my nose or ears now. Its not fair.

    I am no expert but I know my wife has been insulted by black women not white women on her hair. They make some pretty wierd rude comments. But that is just what I have observed and it may mean nothing. If you ask me it seems there is tension between black women who keep their hair natural and the ones who straighten their hair. But I really do not know. Usually when they get into that stuff, I quickly leave. I do not have enough hair to offer an
    opinion. I guess I would like my wife even if she was bald.
    You may find this blog interesting. It's about a white man who encourages his black gf to go natural, and the ups and downs she goes through with the flack she gets...or the perceived flak. Just part of it;

    The Coil Review Blog: Memoirs of a White Man: Part II - By: Alex Barnett
    ''After my ear stopped ringing from the head-slap she gave me, I apologized, and reassured her that she did not, in fact, look like a boy. And, honestly, she didn't. All kidding aside. She looked great. With the bun-lette she looked like a ballerina (with a great booty, I might add). But, no, she insisted, she looked like a boy.

    "Why do you say this?" I asked, trying to understand.

    HER: "My hair--it's so short."

    And, that's when I learned the truth of women's hair. They love their hair more than we men do. At some level, it's an emblem of femininity. It's a way of saying "I am a woman." Any woman who has had long hair and then cuts it off is going against convention. And, that is disquieting to anyone, especially to a Black woman with a White boyfriend, who's too stupid to realize that this is a big deal and who -- she noted with a fair amount of anger--suggested cutting off the long hair in the first place.

    ME: "Wait," I protested. "I wasn't the one who said you should cut off the hair, I only--"
    She shot me a look and held up her hand--the universal sign for: "You are a man and, therefore, wrong. Even if logic, facts and a tape recording of the conversation would support your position, you are still wrong."The "I look like a boy" phase was a walk in the park compared to what came next.
    Phase III: This Is Crazy!


    As the natural curly hair began to grow and push the chemically straightened hairs out and away from her head, the bun-lette gave way. It could no longer contain the hybrid, partly-curly, partly-straight hair. Rather, what resulted was full-out gang warfare: the natural-curlies versus the bone-straights. It was the Sharks and the Jets going at it, full-bore. But, the natural-curlies weren't strong enough to fully assert themselves. And, the bone-straights, although they had lost their dominant position, were not ready to give up just yet.

    The result: a strange line (a DMZ if you will) that ran across the top of my girlfriend's head and marked the place where the natural-curlies ended and the bone-straights began.

    HER: "I can't believe I have a line on top of my head" , my girlfriend remarked many, many, many times during this phase. "And, what is it? Is it curly? Is it straight? This is crazy!"
    What followed was a torrent, months worth of emotional lava that had been bubbling and percolating just below the surface of this generally happy, smiling, even-keeled woman.



    HER: "You just don't get it. When I walk into a room now, everyone is looking at me."



    ME: "No, they don't," I said, trying to reassure her.



    HER: "Yes, they do," she said. "And everyone's wondering why you're with me."



    ME: "That's crazy...no, they're really not."



    HER: "You just don't get it."



    But, I was starting to "get it" that I didn't get it, because I was White (and, secondarily, because I was male) and didn't understand that what she was going through was nothing short of a transformation that challenged racial, gender and societal norms and expectations. This was as far away from my own experience as anything I could or can imagine.

    If I go to the barber, and he screws up, the worst that happens is a buddy makes fun of me. Then, within a week or two, my hair grows back to more-or-less what it looked like, and no one cares or says anything. So when my girlfriend first started down this path, I had thought to myself: ‘It's only a hairstyle.' But, I was wrong. There was no only about it. No, she cuts off her hair and starts to grow an afro, and for her -I was learning– it was a big deal, seemingly a bigger deal than dating a White guy.

    Going natural, it seems, is considered by some to be "unnatural." So by doing this, she was making a statement with her hair, a really big statement: a statement about parting with a hairstyle taught to her by her mother; a statement that she wasn't going to just go along with what other women or women's magazines said was "in" or "looked good,"; a statement that you don't need a luxurious weave (yes, I learned a little about those too) to be a good-looking woman. She was saying, for all the world to hear, that a woman doesn't have to have straightened hair to have "good" hair. And, for the moment, making this statement was taking its toll. It was (at least for the moment) leaving her feeling lost, confused, and upset.''

  2. #102
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    HER: "You just don't get it. When I walk into a room now, everyone is looking at me."
    She sounds paranoid.
    Why would people be looking at her?

    All right, i may have missed the point but still ...


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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by missypea View Post
    Yes, I do see where you're coming from. I agree with you.

    I don't think that every black person who processes their hair does so because they want to fit into a "white" society though. I think it's much more personal than that. Hatuey's just being Hatuey.



    .
    I've recently seen this "controversy" in my own workplace, which employs only a few black women.
    One woman recently began to wear her hair "natural" (and has been rather vocal about how pleased she is with it), and others are mocking, sniping, and tearing her down behind her back.
    I think this may be largely a jealousy issue; the "natural" chick is young, very beautiful, and could probably pull off any hairstyle. The others, not.
    But it has been made to seem like a class issue.
    Hatuey is not the only one who thinks in these terms (hairstyle indicating something about social class).

  4. #104
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    I'd rather seen a kept up afro any day over a bad wig/weave.
    Quote Originally Posted by faithful_servant View Post
    Being a psychiatric patient does not mean that you are mentally ill.



  5. #105
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?




    Am I to understand there may be a relationship between hairstyle and social class?

    Say it ain't so!!
    "you're better off on Stormfront discussing how evil brown men are taking innocent white flowers." Infinite Chaos

  6. #106
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gardener View Post



    Am I to understand there may be a relationship between hairstyle and social class?

    Say it ain't so!!
    Styles change. It's all a social construct.

    Quote Originally Posted by faithful_servant View Post
    Being a psychiatric patient does not mean that you are mentally ill.



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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gardener View Post



    Am I to understand there may be a relationship between hairstyle and social class?

    Say it ain't so!!
    It occurred to me, too (the connection between mullets and "trailer trash").
    The fact remains that all the mullet-wearing trailer trash has to do it cut the back of his hair (which would take five seconds) to suddenly become (in society's eyes) a "normal", upstanding citizen.

    As evidenced by the blog above, a black woman's transformation from "natural" to "processed" or back again takes a great deal more effort than that.

  8. #108
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by rivrrat View Post
    I never would have considered that an afro. But if that's considered an afro, then I like that very much. Moreso than the so-called "professional" picture you posted above it.

    However, I don't consider traditional, natural afros 'unprofessional' by any stretch of the imagination.
    Afros can be worn several different ways. When many hear the word afro, they think of the dry puff afro. She either twisted or braided her hair the night before and unraveled it the next day. I'm actually starting to see more naturals in ads, and commerials. I think it may be becoming more common.

  9. #109
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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by StandUpChuck View Post
    That's why I used the word "or" ladies. I didn't say all of the above.
    Yeah, I said I get highlights once every 5 years or so. I got them about a year ago. Prior to that it had been like 8 years. It's not like it's a normal occurrence. It's a RARE occurrence.

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    Re: Do white people care how black women wear their hair?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hatuey View Post
    To me they remind me too much of some of my less, refined friends in California. I associate braids with gangbanging(Being in a gang. Not the other one) and Fros are for me associated with the 60s and 70s black power movements. It's also a matter of aesthetics. I know many people who have 'afros' and work in very professional environments however to me they simply don't look 'clean'. But it's not a race thing. It's just my own perception of what looks good in a professional working environment and what doesn't.
    Certain kinds of braids definitely make me think about gangbanging, but I'm thinking about the type that (mostly) guys wear with colored bands in them. I just really don't think that much about other people's hair as long as it's clean and looks halfway neat.

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