View Poll Results: How satisfied are you with your current health insurance provider?

Voters
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  • Satisfied: Why?

    34 50.00%
  • Unsatisfied: Why?

    23 33.82%
  • I don't have health insurance: Why?

    11 16.18%
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Thread: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

  1. #211
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    Re: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cassandra View Post
    I can corroborate that- Jackalope and I both live in Maine. $25,000 a year is what it costs for a low deductible policy for my family of 3.
    In a recent letter to the editor, a woman claimed her family premiums are now $35,000 a year. Premiums, not health care costs! One insurer with 80% market share-that is where the system is headed. Maine is just somewhat in advance of the rest of you.

    It's insane, Cassandra, just insane.

    They *must* fix this .... we all will go broke. The whole country.

  2. #212
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    Re: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

    Quote Originally Posted by UtahBill View Post
    What company, or companies, are you talking about?

    • WellPoint Inc., Maine’s biggest health insurer,
    holds 78 percent of the state market. Together
    with Aetna Inc., they control 88 percent of the
    market.1
    • From 2004 to 2007 Anthem Health Care,
    WellPoint Inc.’s Maine subsidiary, saw profit
    grow by 89 percent, from $40 million to $76
    million, although its membership grew by
    only 2.4 percent.2
    • Health insurance premiums for Maine working
    families have skyrocketed, increasing 90
    percent from 2000 to 2007.3
    • For family health coverage in Maine during
    that time, the average annual combined
    premium for employers and employees rose
    from $6,915 to $13,117.4
    • For family health coverage in Maine from
    2000 to 2007, the average employer’s portion
    of annual premiums rose 87 percent, while the
    average worker’s share grew by 96 percent.5
    • From 2000 to 2007, the median earnings of
    Maine workers increased 17 percent, from
    $22,163 to $25,876. During that time health
    insurance premiums for Maine working
    families rose 5.4 times faster than median
    earnings.6
    When a firm has more than a 42 percent share
    of a single market, the U.S. Justice Department
    considers that market to be “highly concentrated.”
    This means that an insurer could raise premiums
    and/or reduce the variety of plans or quality of
    services offered to customers with impunity.7

    http://hcfan.3cdn.net/343c5b1f2bf622d0be_xpm6bx122.pdf

  3. #213
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    Re: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

    Quote Originally Posted by jallman View Post
    Cost/benefit analysis.

    Try it on sometime.
    Have you considered the occurrences of both dead weight loss, as well as the spillover cost effect on prices? Not that i believe health care should be nationalized, but there is an entire group of people who for some reason or another, cannot obtain insurance.

    On the other hand, American obesity is an obstacle not even perfect health care reform can cover (given the amount of both DWL and unintended consequences).

    The reason Frances health care seems to work (for the people) is due to the fact that obesity is not a true epidemic. It is a major issue here.
    It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.
    "Wealth of Nations," Book V, Chapter II, Part II, Article I, pg.911

  4. #214
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    Re: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goldenboy219 View Post
    Have you considered the occurrences of both dead weight loss, as well as the spillover cost effect on prices? Not that i believe health care should be nationalized, but there is an entire group of people who for some reason or another, cannot obtain insurance.

    On the other hand, American obesity is an obstacle not even perfect health care reform can cover (given the amount of both DWL and unintended consequences).

    The reason Frances health care seems to work (for the people) is due to the fact that obesity is not a true epidemic. It is a major issue here.
    I am not willing to tell people what they can and cannot eat. I am willing to say to people, though, that if you want to be covered by insurance that the country pays for, you will meet certain health standards that are a personal choice or you will pay for your coverage/care out of your own pocket.

  5. #215
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    Re: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

    Quote Originally Posted by jallman View Post
    I am not willing to tell people what they can and cannot eat. I am willing to say to people, though, that if you want to be covered by insurance that the country pays for, you will meet certain health standards that are a personal choice or you will pay for your coverage/care out of your own pocket.
    And you would be correct because to a rather small point, obesity can be a pre-existing condition.

    But getting back to CBA, what happens when HMO's and other private entities deny people coverage for whatever reason? The answer is both dead weight loss, as well as a spillover effect in prices. If someone does not have coverage, they are far more likely to go to the ER to receive basic care that could be provided by a general practitioner. So while they are busy looking at Joe Dirt's sore throat, someone who just had their foot sliced open with a chain saw is in the waiting room with it wrapped up with a towel (true story). Of course, Joe Dirt is not going to pay for his services rendered, and the total cost of repairing the guys foot has just increased from $10k to $15k.

    Emergency rooms are not going to deny coverage. You might have to wait, but you will eventually be seen, which carries the risk of extremely high opportunity costs.
    It is not very unreasonable that the rich should contribute to the public expense, not only in proportion to their revenue, but something more than in that proportion.
    "Wealth of Nations," Book V, Chapter II, Part II, Article I, pg.911

  6. #216
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    Re: How satisfied are you with your health insurance provider?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goldenboy219 View Post
    And you would be correct because to a rather small point, obesity can be a pre-existing condition.

    But getting back to CBA, what happens when HMO's and other private entities deny people coverage for whatever reason? The answer is both dead weight loss, as well as a spillover effect in prices. If someone does not have coverage, they are far more likely to go to the ER to receive basic care that could be provided by a general practitioner. So while they are busy looking at Joe Dirt's sore throat, someone who just had their foot sliced open with a chain saw is in the waiting room with it wrapped up with a towel (true story). Of course, Joe Dirt is not going to pay for his services rendered, and the total cost of repairing the guys foot has just increased from $10k to $15k.

    Emergency rooms are not going to deny coverage. You might have to wait, but you will eventually be seen, which carries the risk of extremely high opportunity costs.
    So stop seeing Joe Dirt in the ER. Tell Joe Dirt he needs to be seen by a general practitioner once he has been triaged and is shown to have nothing more than a sore throat.

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