View Poll Results: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

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  • Yes, it is an implied power

    26 81.25%
  • No, it is not mentioned in the Constitution

    2 6.25%
  • Other/Don't know

    4 12.50%
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Thread: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

  1. #41
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    Obviously not.
    But hey -- be proud of your non-critical thinkning skills.
    A simple "thank you, Singularity" would have sufficed, but you're welcome.

    In any case, you now know that the Air Force is Constitutional, so enjoy!
    Last edited by Singularity; 06-24-09 at 12:36 PM.

  2. #42
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Singularity View Post
    A simple "thank you, Singularity" would have sufficed, but you're welcome.
    A thank-you for what?
    Exposing your 2nd rate education?

    Well, OK... thanks!

  3. #43
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    A thank-you for what?
    Exposing your 2nd rate education?

    Well, OK... thanks!
    No problem. Fortunately for me and my "second rate education", I knew that the Air Force is Constitutional. And since that's correct, thank goodness for it!

  4. #44
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Singularity View Post
    No problem. Fortunately for me and my "second rate education", I knew that the Air Force is Constitutional.
    No... bevcause your 2nd rate education tought you only to swallow what was fed to you, you do -not- know that - as evidenced by your response to my question.

  5. #45
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    No... bevcause your 2nd rate education tought you only to swallow what was fed to you, you do -not- know that - as evidenced by your response to my question.
    Well, if you can provide a link from a credible source like I did to support your argument, I'd love to read it.

  6. #46
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Singularity View Post
    Well, if you can provide a link from a credible source like I did to support your argument, I'd love to read it.
    The fact that you cannot answer my question provides all the support I need:
    -You rest your premise on the elastic clause.
    -To operate, the elastic clause requires a 'forementioned power'.
    -You cannot cite any such 'forementioned power'.
    Thus, the elastic clause cannot operate; your premise fails.

  7. #47
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    The fact that you cannot answer my question provides all the support I need:
    -You rest your premise on the elastic clause.
    -To operate, the elastic clause requires a 'forementioned power'.
    -You cannot cite any such 'forementioned power'.
    Thus, the elastic clause cannot operate; your premise fails.
    Don't shoot the messenger. I'm simply relaying the facts to you, that the Air Force is Constitutional. If you disagree, you should take that up with Constitutional lawyers, professors, and justices of the court. I see it the way they do.

    However, one error you made is in saying that the elastic clause requires a 'forementioned power'. The elastic clause states that Congress can "make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers", not that it requires a forementioned power to operate per se. If you disagree, I want you to show me exactly where the elastic clause specifically states that - your words - "To operate, the elastic clause requires a 'forementioned power'."

    However, if you are insistent upon a forementioned power, then one has to look no further than the very same article to see "To raise and support Armies", which is a forementioned power. Since the Air Force can be interpreted as an 'army of the air', then there you have it.

    Source: http://www.usconstitution.net/const.txt

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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    First all of you are wrong on how and when the USAF became a seperated Service.

    Time for a little History Lesson the USAF as we know it started out as the following.

    Aeronautical Division, U.S. Signal Corps (1 August 1907 to 18 July 1914)
    Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps (18 July 1914 to 20 May 1918)
    Division of Military Aeronautics (20 May 1918 to 24 May 1918)
    U.S. Army Air Service (24 May 1918 to 2 July 1926)
    U.S. Army Air Corps (2 July 1926 to 20 June 1941)
    U.S. Army Air Forces (20 June 1941 to 17 September 1947)

    On July 26 1947 President Harry Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947. This was the act that set up not only the USAF but NSC/NSA and the CIA.

    I suggest everyone to read US Code 50 Chapter 15,

    US CODE: Title 50,CHAPTER 15—NATIONAL SECURITY

  9. #49
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Singularity View Post
    I see it the way they do.
    Yes... which gets back to your failure to think critically.

    However, one error you made is in saying that the elastic clause requires a 'forementioned power'. The elastic clause states that Congress can "make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers", not that it requires a forementioned power to operate per se.
    Sorry -- foreGOING power, not foreMENTIONED power.

    The Elastic Clause requires a specific power allocated to Congress to be operable. As previosly noted, you cannot specify that related power, and so your Elastic Clause argument fails.

    If the elastic clause did NOT require a specifc foregoing power to be operable, then there's be no need for ANY specific powers to be given to Congress. That there are numerouns spowers allocated to Congress nillifies this argument through the canon agains surplusage.

    However, if you are insistent upon a forementioned power, then one has to look no further than the very same article to see "To raise and support Armies", which is a forementioned power. Since the Air Force can be interpreted as an 'army of the air', then there you have it.
    Gee. That was original.
    By your reasoning, specifying the power to create the navy was redundant, as a navy is just an 'army of the sea'.
    Again, the canon against surplusage nullifies this argument.

  10. #50
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    Re: Is the U.S. Air Force Constitutional?

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    Yes... which gets back to your failure to think critically.
    Which also illustrates perfectly why i'm right on this issue. Since I agree with the constitutional lawyers, professors, and anyone who knows anything about the Constitution, I have the luxury of being correct. Since you obviously disagree, you have the misfortune of being wrong. Of course, don't take my word for it. Email any law professor or Constitutional lawyer in the country, then attempt to say that the Air Force is an unconstitutional organization. They'll correct your argument for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    Sorry -- foreGOING power, not foreMENTIONED power.
    Definition of foregoing: previously stated, written, or occurring; preceding: The foregoing paragraph presents the problem. foregoing definition | Dictionary.com

    Definition of forementioned: Mentioned before; already cited; aforementioned. forementioned definition | Dictionary.com

    Same thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    The Elastic Clause requires a specific power allocated to Congress to be operable. As previosly noted, you cannot specify that related power, and so your Elastic Clause argument fails.
    I just did - the power to raise armies.

    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    If the elastic clause did NOT require a specifc foregoing power to be operable, then there's be no need for ANY specific powers to be given to Congress. That there are numerouns spowers allocated to Congress nillifies this argument through the canon agains surplusage.
    Show me exactly where the Constitution says this.


    Quote Originally Posted by Goobieman View Post
    Gee. That was original.
    By your reasoning, specifying the power to create the navy was redundant, as a navy is just an 'army of the sea'.
    Again, the canon against surplusage nullifies this argument.
    Nope. The Constitution mentions the Navy specifically.

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