View Poll Results: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

Voters
82. You may not vote on this poll
  • Marijuana

    67 81.71%
  • Cocaine

    36 43.90%
  • LSD

    38 46.34%
  • Meth

    30 36.59%
  • Prescription drugs

    33 40.24%
  • Psychedelic mushrooms

    44 53.66%
  • Ecstasy

    35 42.68%
  • Opium

    38 46.34%
  • other

    28 34.15%
  • None of the above

    14 17.07%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 29 of 30 FirstFirst ... 1927282930 LastLast
Results 281 to 290 of 294

Thread: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

  1. #281
    Sage
    scourge99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Wild West
    Last Seen
    01-27-12 @ 01:50 AM
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    6,233

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Quote Originally Posted by scourge99 View Post
    Wow. Comparing three DIFFERENT countries crime rates and drug use rates and PRESUMING that the drug enforcement policy of the countries is the reason or even a strong contributing factor? Perhaps we should make a valid study.. you know... like comparing crime and drug rates OF THE SAME COUNTRY over the years when drugs were illegal and then legal?
    Marijuana Myths

    The Facts

    In 1976, following the recommendations of two national commissions, the Dutch government revised many aspects of its drug policy. While not legalizing marijuana, it adopted an "expediency principle," which directed police and prosecutors to ignore retail sale to adults as long as the circumstances of the sale do not constitute a public nuisance.

    This change in policy was based on several factors, including:

    * a principle of tolerance toward alternative lifestyles
    * a finding that, compared to other illegal drugs, marijuana poses little risk to users
    * a desire to protect marijuana users from the marginalization that accompanies arrest and prosecution
    * a belief that separating the retail markets for "soft" and "hard" drugs decreases the likelihood that marijuana users will experiment with cocaine or heroin

    Following the policy change, marijuana sales emerged openly in coffee shops, which were required to follow a set of regulations, including a ban on advertising, sale of no more than 5 grams at a time, and a minimum purchase age of 18. The sale of other drugs on the premises is strictly prohibited, and constitutes grounds for immediate closure by the police. Local officials were also authorized to create additional regulations to protect the interests of the community—for example, limiting the number of coffee shops concentrated in any one area. 87

    Since liberalization, marijuana use has increased in the Netherlands, although rates remain similar to those in neighboring European countries, and are generally lower than those in the United States.
    From all sources: marijuana.com

    cocaine is illegal in the Netherlands, btw.
    Last edited by scourge99; 05-26-09 at 10:53 PM.
    If you believe in the Supernatural then you can become a millionaire!

    Questioning or criticizing another's core beliefs is inadvertently perceived as offensive and rude.

  2. #282
    Guru
    Binary_Digit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Last Seen
    08-24-16 @ 01:34 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian
    Posts
    3,413

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Note: I can't get all these quotes to work right. Whenever I preview, it keeps inserting extra quote tags that muck it all up. =/

    Quote Originally Posted by scourge99 View Post
    Since liberalization, marijuana use has increased in the Netherlands
    Marijuana Myths
    Excellent post, thank you!

    But did marijuana use increase because of the drug policy, or could it have been something else?

    [quote]Dirk Korf of the Institute of Criminology at the University of Amsterdam finds that surveys of the number of Germans who use cannabis "virtually parallels" the peaks and troughs in Dutch surveys between 1970 and 1990, even though Germany has prohibited cannabis throughout the period.

    Ganja in Jamaica - Articles - The Netherlands' Case

    (Columbia University)
    [
    /quote]

    Overall drug use in the Netherlands was on the rise when the decriminalization policies went into effect, so it's relevant to consider that fact in the context of any increase in marijuana use immediately afterward.

    It has been demonstrated that the more or less free sale of quantities of soft drugs for personal use in the Netherlands has not given rise to levels of use significantly higher than in countries which pursue a highly repressive policy in this regard.

    http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/attachem...%20English.pdf

    (Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport)


    Following the rapid increase around 1976, cannabis use declined again, and has now become more or less stabilized.

    The Dutch Cannabis Debate, 1968-1976

    (The Dutch Cannabis Debate, Journal of Drug Issues 24)
    Decriminalization is said to increase availability, encourage use, and provide disincentives to quit. Thus, we expected longer careers and fewer quitters in Amsterdam, but our findings did not support these expectations. (snip) With the exception of higher drug use in San Francisco, we found
    strong similarities across both cities. We found no evidence to support claims that criminalization reduces use or that decriminalization increases use.

    http://www.mapinc.org/lib/limited.pdf

    (American Journal of Public Health)
    In sum, there is little evidence that decriminalization of marijuana use necessarily leads to a substantial increase in marijuana use."

    Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base

    (National Academy of Sciences - Institute of Medicine)


    [quote]
    This study examines whether the decriminalization of marijuana in eleven states has affected serf-reported usage of drugs. Generally, decriminalization is not found to significantly impact drug use. An implication is that the demand for drugs is highly inelastic with respect to incremental changes in the legal sanctions for possession of small amounts of marijuana.

    There is no strong evidence that decriminalization effects either the choice or frequency of use of drugs, either legal (alcohol) or illegal (marijuana and cocaine).

    http://www.icjia.state.il.us/GoTo204...%20ALCOHOL.doc

    (Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority)
    [/quote
    ]

    The available evidence indicates that the "decriminalization" of marijuana possession had little or no impact on rates of use. Although rates of marijuana use increased in those U.S. states which reduced maximum penalties for possession to a fine, the prevalence of use increased at similar or higher rates in those states which retained more severe penalties. There were also no discernable impacts on the health care systems. On the other hand, the so-called "decriminalization" measures did result in substantial savings in the criminal justice system.

    The impact of marijuana decriminalization: an upda...[J Public Health Policy. 1989] - PubMed Result

    (National Center for Biotechnology Information)
    The preponderance of the evidence gathered and examined for this study points to the conclusion that decriminalization had virtually no effect either on the marijuana use or on related attitudes and beliefs about marijuana use among American young people in this age group. The degree of disapproval young people hold for marijuana use, the extent to which they believe such use is harmful, and the degree to which they perceive the drug to be available to them were also unaffected by the law change.

    NCJRS Abstract - National Criminal Justice Reference Service

    (National Criminal Justice Reference Service)
    Several lines of evidence on the deterrent effects of marijuana laws [3], and on decriminalization experiences in the United States, the Netherlands, and Australia suggest that eliminating (or significantly reducing) criminal penalties for first-time possession of small quantities of marijuana has either no effect or a very small effect on the prevalence of marijuana use.

    Major publications from the RAND Drug Policy Research Center's

    (University of California, Berkely)
    The available evidence indicates that depenalisation of the possession of small quantities of cannabis does not increase cannabis prevalence. The Dutch experience suggests that commercial promotion and sales may significantly increase cannabis prevalence.

    Evaluating alternative cannabis regimes (and follow-up comments)

    (The British Journal of Psychiatry)
    Fear of apprehension, fear of being imprisoned, the cost of cannabis or the difficulty in obtaining cannabis do not appear to exert a strong influence on decisions about cannabis consumption, at least amongst the vast majority of 18-29 year olds. Those factors may limit cannabis use among frequent cannabis users but there is no evidence, as yet, to support this conjecture.

    Lawlink NSW: B58 - Does prohibition deter cannabis use?

    (Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research, Germany)
    The available data indicate that these decriminalisation measures had little or no impact on rates of use.

    http://dassa.sa.gov.au/webdata/resou...MONOGRAPH6.pdf

    (Drug and Alcohol Services Council, South Australia)
    There is no evidence to date that the CEN system in South Australia has increased levels of regular cannabis use, or rates of experimentation among young adults.

    http://www.aodgp.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/332B63EE0E0E0C39CA25703700041DAC/$File/mono37.pdf

    (National Drug Strategy Household Surveys, South Austrailia)
    In Australia the evidence is accumulating -- from public attitude surveys coming down on the side of liberalising cannabis laws, from criminal justice system data indicating a vast, expensive and relatively punitive net being cast over youthful cannabis users, and from evidence that liberalisation does not increase cannabis use -- that the total prohibition approach is costly, ineffective as a general deterrent, and does not fit with the National Drug Strategy's goal of harm minimisation.

    http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/ti48.pdf

    (Austrailian Institute of Criminology)
    Clearly, by itself, a punitive policy towards possession and use accounts for limited variation in nation level rates of illegal drug use.

    PLoS Medicine: Toward a Global View of Alcohol, Tobacco, Cannabis, and Cocaine Use: Findings from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    (Public Library of Science, World Health Organization)

  3. #283
    Sage

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Last Seen
    09-22-16 @ 07:06 AM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    29,215

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Binary_Digit View Post
    Note: I can't get all these quotes to work right. Whenever I preview, it keeps inserting extra quote tags that muck it all up. =/]
    Use caps instead of lower case when you want to quote.

    [quote] = no

    [QUOTE] = yes.

  4. #284
    Sage
    kaya'08's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    British Turk
    Last Seen
    05-12-14 @ 11:14 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Centrist
    Posts
    6,363

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Quote Originally Posted by winston53660 View Post
    Use caps instead of lower case when you want to quote.
    It doesnt make a difference. He isnt ending the bb code with the / symbol.

    Its like this:

    [Quote]Hey[/Quote]

    (obviously dont underline the quote tag. I only underlined the quote tag so it doesnt execute the quote script im just showing it to you as an example).
    Last edited by kaya'08; 05-27-09 at 10:17 AM.
    "If religious instruction were not allowed until the child had attained the age of reason, we would be living in quite a different world" - Christopher Hitchens
    > Good to be back, but I'm only visiting for a few weeks. <

  5. #285
    Guru
    Binary_Digit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Last Seen
    08-24-16 @ 01:34 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian
    Posts
    3,413

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Thanks for the tips guys, but I've been a software engineer for over 8 years, and I've been quoting people on these forums and others for longer than that. I've written XML parsers in 3 different languages from scratch, so I'm well aware of how to properly nest and close markup tags. I'm quite certain there were no syntax errors as I went back and checked the problem quotes about 10 times before finally giving up.

  6. #286
    User Thoreau's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Last Seen
    09-17-09 @ 06:48 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian
    Posts
    102

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Thank you for that post Digit.
    All rational action is in the first place individual action. Only the individual thinks. Only the individual reasons. Only the individual acts.

    -Ludwig von Mises

  7. #287
    Advisor NDNdancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    On the Edge
    Last Seen
    03-11-12 @ 10:47 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Liberal
    Posts
    523

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    I might have a slightly different take on this issue then most people here. I voted "none", but I also don't believe in criminalizing drug addicts ie those who are truly addicted to meth, heroin etc..

    Now, given that, I also don't believe in recreational use of "drugs". I work with many Indigenous Peoples around the world, and most of the plants those "drugs" come from have healing properties and are used in ceremonies.

    So, using something that has both a spiritual and healing connotation for recreation, is not something I would do.

    That's a totally personal preference and choice. It has nothing to do with the legal system, other then constantly having to argue with the powers that be for the use of our medicines without harassment!

    What you and others choose to do is your choice and the use of drugs shouldn't be illegal or they need to make alcohol and tobacco use illegal as well as both are drugs.

    We really need to quit making criminals of addicts and allow for the responsible use of limited amounts of some drugs similar to tobacco and alcohol. Prohibition didn't work before and it's not working now.

  8. #288
    Sage
    First Thought's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Last Seen
    12-01-10 @ 02:34 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    6,218

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Quote Originally Posted by NDNdancer View Post
    I might have a slightly different take on this issue then most people here. I voted "none", but I also don't believe in criminalizing drug addicts ie those who are truly addicted to meth, heroin etc..

    Now, given that, I also don't believe in recreational use of "drugs". I work with many Indigenous Peoples around the world, and most of the plants those "drugs" come from have healing properties and are used in ceremonies.
    Have you worked with Ayahuasca or Ibogaine?
    "An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it." - Gandhi

  9. #289
    Advisor NDNdancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    On the Edge
    Last Seen
    03-11-12 @ 10:47 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Liberal
    Posts
    523

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Quote Originally Posted by EgoffTib View Post
    Have you worked with Ayahuasca or Ibogaine?
    Actually, we worked with a coalition of Indigenous Peoples to stop the patenting of Ayahuasca by one of the US drug companies. We had a pretty successful international campaign.

    What eventually happened, because of Ayahuasca and other plants, we were able to help groups develop legal language that eventually their countries adopted that protected Indigenous plant knowledge from biopiracy as well as patenting.

    I've also used it in ceremony, several times.

    I've not done much work in Gabon other then within the UN system on some Indigenous issues in common. I'd like to be able to experience their healing with ibogaine root. I've heard that it's a powerful cleanser of both the spirit as well as the body and mind. One day I hope.

  10. #290
    Sage
    First Thought's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Last Seen
    12-01-10 @ 02:34 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    6,218

    Re: Which drugs should be legalized for recreational use?

    Quote Originally Posted by NDNdancer View Post
    Actually, we worked with a coalition of Indigenous Peoples to stop the patenting of Ayahuasca by one of the US drug companies. We had a pretty successful international campaign.

    What eventually happened, because of Ayahuasca and other plants, we were able to help groups develop legal language that eventually their countries adopted that protected Indigenous plant knowledge from biopiracy as well as patenting.

    I've also used it in ceremony, several times.

    I've not done much work in Gabon other then within the UN system on some Indigenous issues in common. I'd like to be able to experience their healing with ibogaine root. I've heard that it's a powerful cleanser of both the spirit as well as the body and mind. One day I hope.
    Very impressive. I have explored Ayahusaca on two occasions, both of which were beyond words. Ibogaine has an absurd amount of healing properties, no big surprise the big wigs in the pharmaceutical companies pushed so hard to make it a scheduled drug.
    "An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody sees it." - Gandhi

Page 29 of 30 FirstFirst ... 1927282930 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •