View Poll Results: Would you prosecute this guy?

Voters
7. You may not vote on this poll
  • yes, he is a torturer

    3 42.86%
  • no, he saved some lives

    2 28.57%
  • other

    2 28.57%
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

  1. #1
    dangerously addictive
    americanwoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 03:16 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    14,669

    Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Let's say it comes out in the news that an innocent ordinary Iraqi guy heard about a US attack against his house because the army heard wrong information that the Iraqi guy was a terrorist. So this guy and some friends grabs a US soldier and tortures him to get the information by waterboarding him or worse. In came out there actually was an attack planned. So the Iraqi stops the attack against his house, because through the torture he was able to get the information he needed, and was able to clear his name and stop the attack and save his life and his families.


    So, would you demand the "torturers" be tried for their "crimes"?

    I mean this in all seriousness.
    Is what you're living for today, worth dying for tomorrow?
    _____________________________________________

  2. #2
    Pathetic Douchebag
    Cilogy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Last Seen
    10-10-14 @ 03:42 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    1,587

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    What's with all these torture threads?

    I would say yes, only if the Iraqi laws say that torture is illegal. If it is illegal, the person should be prosecuted. Simple follow-through of the justice system.


  3. #3
    Sage
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Seen
    08-27-09 @ 06:41 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    6,344

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    I am not an Iraqi, nor am I subject to Iraqi law. The question as such is of no consequence to me personally.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    United States
    Last Seen
    01-21-16 @ 11:21 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    51,124

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by americanwoman View Post
    Let's say it comes out in the news that an innocent ordinary Iraqi guy heard about a US attack against his house because the army heard wrong information that the Iraqi guy was a terrorist. So this guy and some friends grabs a US soldier and tortures him to get the information by waterboarding him or worse. In came out there actually was an attack planned. So the Iraqi stops the attack against his house, because through the torture he was able to get the information he needed, and was able to clear his name and stop the attack and save his life and his families.


    So, would you demand the "torturers" be tried for their "crimes"?

    I mean this in all seriousness.
    Waterboarding isn't tourture, even when it's a US soldier being waterboarded.

    Assuming actual torure was being used, yes I would call for prosecution.

    Assuming actual torure was being used AND the attack was unjust, I would call for prosecution bacause I'm on America's side and will use any means to protect my team from the other.

  5. #5
    Guru
    ADK_Forever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last Seen
    05-07-11 @ 07:26 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    3,706

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry View Post
    Waterboarding isn't tourture...
    That's not what the law says.

    From: Waterboarding is Illegal - Washington University Law Review
    In his 2007 confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee considering his nomination to be Attorney General of the United States, Judge Michael Mukasey refused to address the legality of waterboarding.[1] In my opinion there is no reasonable dispute about this matter. The laws of the United States make waterboarding unlawful in no uncertain terms.[2]
    There is no doubt that waterboarding is illegal under the plain language of each of these four statutes. When it is practiced in other countries, the State Department characterizes waterboarding as “torture.”[46] Waterboarding inflicts “severe pain and suffering” on its victims, both physically and mentally, and therefore it is torture within the meaning of the Torture Act and the War Crimes Act.[47] It inflicts “serious pain and suffering” upon its victims, and it qualifies as “serious physical abuse,” therefore it is “cruel or inhuman treatment” within the meaning of the War Crimes Act.[48] Finally, American courts have ruled that when prisoners in the United States are subjected to waterboarding, it is a violation of the Fifth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments, and therefore it would be a violation of 42 U.S.C. §§ 2000dd and 2000dd-0 prohibiting cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment.[49]
    Even before these laws were adopted the United States considered waterboarding to be torture and a criminal offense.[53] After World War II, the United States prosecuted and convicted a number of Japanese officers for torturing captured American servicemen by waterboarding.[54] Great Britain prosecuted another group of Japanese officers who had tortured British soldiers using this technique, and sentenced them to death.[55] Over a century ago, the United States prosecuted and convicted American military officers who used waterboarding against prisoners in the Philippines.[56]
    Furthermore, there are instrumental arguments against the use of waterboarding. First, torture is neither an efficient nor an effective means of gathering intelligence.[60] Second, waterboarding prisoners violates our treaty obligations, thus offending our allies in the War on Terror.[61] Third, by engaging in this practice ourselves, we invite our enemies to treat our captured soldiers likewise,[62] and if our government adopts the position that waterboarding is legal, then we will have given up the right to prosecute our enemies for subjecting our soldiers to this treatment.[63] Finally, in the event that we were to obtain useful information from a prisoner by means of waterboarding, it would be virtually impossible to prosecute the prisoner because coerced confessions[64] and any evidence obtained by means of a coerced confession[65] are constitutionally inadmissible, despite provisions of the Detainee Treatment Act and the Military Commissions Act which purport to preserve the admissibility of coerced confessions.[66]

    The policy considerations which militate against the use of waterboarding are compelling, but they are not relevant to assessing the legality of the practice. Regardless of its utility or lack of utility as a method of interrogation, waterboarding violates both the letter and the spirit of the Torture Act, the War Crimes Act, and the Prohibition against Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment. Accordingly, waterboarding is illegal.
    But, I hold no illusions that the law would sway your opinion.

    But, it is still the law.
    Last edited by ADK_Forever; 05-14-09 at 11:33 AM.
    Thank You Barack Obama for Restoring Honor To The Presidency.
    President Obama will rank as one of our greatest presidents!

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    United States
    Last Seen
    01-21-16 @ 11:21 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    51,124

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by ADK_Forever View Post
    That's not what the law says.
    You're going to wate for me to request a link?

  7. #7
    Klattu Verata Nicto
    LaMidRighter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Louisiana
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 10:09 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    30,473

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by ADK_Forever View Post
    That's not what the law says.
    Okay, 1) that's bull **** and you know it 2) give us an accurate link 3) I think you live to get your ass kicked on this issue, give it up dude.

    Now, as to the question at hand, I voted other. What treaties do they hold? that is the first question. Question 2: Who's life is being saved? (civilian, soldier, war criminal?) 3) what are their internal laws and treaty overlap? 4) is the overall action of some good?
    Neither side in an argument can find the truth when both make an absolute claim on it.

    LMR

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    United States
    Last Seen
    01-21-16 @ 11:21 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    51,124

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by ADK_Forever View Post
    Oh what's this? I was about to thank your post but then...

    Quote Originally Posted by ADK_Forever View Post
    But, I hold no illusions that the law would sway your opinion.

    But, it is still the law.
    Wtf was that?

    Whatever.

  9. #9
    Sage
    Ikari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Last Seen
    Today @ 12:56 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    48,242

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry View Post
    Waterboarding isn't tourture, even when it's a US soldier being waterboarded.
    So were we wrong when we convicted the Japanese of war crimes for waterboarding our POWs during WWII?
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    United States
    Last Seen
    01-21-16 @ 11:21 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    51,124

    Re: Would you call for prosecution if an Iraqi used torture to save a life?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikari View Post
    So were we wrong when we convicted the Japanese of war crimes for waterboarding our POWs during WWII?
    I have no idea what you're talking about, but I would dare speculate that something can be a war crime and not torture.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •