View Poll Results: Have you ever felt that you don't belong in your country?

Voters
46. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    16 34.78%
  • No

    27 58.70%
  • Other

    3 6.52%
Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 94

Thread: Do You Belong Here?

  1. #71
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Last Seen
    12-26-10 @ 05:57 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    8,083

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    All that means is you know a little of many places, rather than a great deal about a few, not a good thing in my book. It seems superficial to me.
    This is a really big assumption which could have been clarified if you had bothered to ask me the nature of my travels. Too late.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    We are still humans with limited faculties, we cannot know and experience everyday detailed associations and areas beyond the quite small. The dichotomy still exists and it seems a lot surer footing against atomism, abstractionism and a better platform for a realistic, free and ordered society if one identifies far more strongly with the little platoons rather than having or trying to have intense patriotism for large areas or humanity, entities we know very little about in our everyday experiences.
    You can have connections to many different communities and people all over the world. This is not only a possibility but a reality for people like me. You're assuming that one way is better but I don't think there is any right or wrong answer. I respect your life experience and what works for you, but don't dictate to me about what is "superficial" and has more value as that is a moot argument. I would never trade my worldly experiences for strictly a local experience any day, even though I have had both and value both. My worldly experience is mostly the culmination of many local experiences anyway. This is why I think the division between micro and macro is essentially meaningless.

    And I wasn't talking about patriotism for all of humanity, but love and compassion. I'm not sure why you are still talking about that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I make no bones about preferring my family by far to random people from the other side of the world and preferring my community to that of a far-flung city and preferring my region to one in China.
    The people who I've met, have formed relationships with, and care deeply for, are hardly "random". I consider a lot of them family just as much as my blood family. I find your definition of family and community to be very narrow and confining. You just have a different upbringing than me I guess.

    If you've never been to China or attempted to form communal ties there, then of course you'll prefer the community you're in now. My point was that nationalism and patriotism are predicated upon artificial boundaries and the emphasis on what is different between societies. You assert that local level patriotism is better... but that is just another border, except it is more on a local level. This town, this county, this population. Before nationalism, even counties had conflicts based on their borders. Even now, there are regional rivalries within nations.

    It's this divisionalism that doesn't make sense to me, because I have been to a number of places and see humans in a different light I suppose. Whether it's local or national, it makes no difference to me. It's still a division.
    Last edited by Orion; 05-07-09 at 11:11 PM.

  2. #72
    Dorset Patriot
    Wessexman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia(but my heart is back in Dorset.)
    Last Seen
    04-04-14 @ 01:37 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    8,233

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Orius View Post
    This is a really big assumption which could have been clarified if you had bothered to ask me the nature of my travels. Too late.
    I didn't have to, I simply assumed the nature of your form; human.


    You can have connections to many different communities and people all over the world. This is not only a possibility but a reality for people like me. You're assuming that one way is better but I don't think there is any right or wrong answer. I respect your life experience and what works for you, but don't dictate to me about what is "superficial" and has more value as that is a moot argument. I would never trade my worldly experiences for strictly a local experience any day, even though I have had both and value both. My worldly experience is mostly the culmination of many local experiences anyway. This is why I think the division between micro and macro is essentially meaningless.
    But these connections are not everyday immersions, they are not based on knowing an area and its people inside out. Even today men are still men and their is only a limit to their faculties. It is superficial because of the sheer impossibility of knowing so many places inside out.

    And I wasn't talking about patriotism for all of humanity, but love and compassion. I'm not sure why you are still talking about that.
    I don't disagree we owe a minimum of those for all humanity but I still think we owe more loyalty and feeling to our own little platoons and that it is better if that is what happens. People who try to be overly universalist and nationalist are both not going the right way in my book.


    The people who I've met, have formed relationships with, and care deeply for, are hardly "random". I consider a lot of them family just as much as my blood family. I find your definition of family and community to be very narrow and confining. You just have a different upbringing than me I guess.
    You could know a few people in many places quite well but it still lacks that everyday connection to place and community. What you are basically saying is that if I know a few people very well from say Nottingham and a few from Rouen and a few from Bangkok and keep in touch with them using all the latest mod-cons then that is as good as having a strong community within your local and region. I suppose this is better than the usual atomistic individaulist and extreme universalist stuff that minimises the importance of social ties completely.

    However I still don't think it rings true psychologically, sociologically or politically. It does not seem to provide the everyday contact within the immersion of culture, community and place that these seem to have always required. The contact is somewhat mediated and isolated, you don't know this person as part of your everyday existence but somehow apart, the cultures and social structures are different and the political and geographical arena as well. I don't doubt that a degree of these contant may be a good thing, so as not to completely parochialise oneself but to rely on them to replace community does not seem wise to me.

    If you've never been to China or attempted to form communal ties there, then of course you'll prefer the community you're in now. My point was that nationalism and patriotism are predicated upon artificial boundaries and the emphasis on what is different between societies. You assert that local level patriotism is better... but that is just another border, except it is more on a local level. This town, this county, this population. Before nationalism, even counties had conflicts based on their borders. Even now, there are regional rivalries within nations.
    The problem with that is even today life is lived locally. We perhaps can talk to those further away more today but we don't live in their worlds still. I think that it is far better to be immersed in the world of your everyday existence, to build most of your community there than to try and build communal ties with a few people from many different places. It weakens the ties and lessens the benefits and still leaves one rather isolated. For instance it is far easier for a strong, community centred village or block to resist a state or a corporation than people isolated all over the country(or world.).

    I think these divisions are often good things. I'm a very particularlist man, I don't believe breaking down borders is often a good thing.
    It's this divisionalism that doesn't make sense to me, because I have been to a number of places and see humans in a different light I suppose. Whether it's local or national, it makes no difference to me. It's still a division.
    Division can be a good thing, in fact it is necessary to a degree for good gov't. Mass man is not a route we should go down any further.
    Last edited by Wessexman; 05-07-09 at 11:31 PM.
    "It is written in the eternal constitution that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." - Edmund Burke

  3. #73
    Sage
    Oftencold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    A small village in Alaska
    Last Seen
    05-08-14 @ 10:53 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    5,044

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    I sometimes wonder what happened to my country, and if it still exists. Especially now that we have a man in the presidency with a resume insufficient to the management of a bait shop, and an inability to speak properly without electronic data input, like some early stage Borg.
    Quod scripsi, scripsi

  4. #74
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Last Seen
    12-26-10 @ 05:57 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    8,083

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I didn't have to, I simply assumed the nature of your form; human.
    No... you assumed that I only know a little about many places, without bothering to ask. It has nothing to do with my form but an erroneous assumption about my life experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    But these connections are not everyday immersions, they are not based on knowing an area and its people inside out. Even today men are still men and their is only a limit to their faculties. It is superficial because of the sheer impossibility of knowing so many places inside out.
    While I haven't felt a strong to connection to every place I've been, I don't agree with your point that you need to know an area inside and out in order for it to be important, or to foster community. I knew the city I grew up in inside and out and to this day it is still the place I hold the least sense of community.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I don't disagree we owe a minimum of those for all humanity but I still think we owe more loyalty and feeling to our own little platoons and that it is better if that is what happens. People who try to be overly universalist and nationalist are both not going the right way in my book.
    Who it is "owed" to is subjective. I'm not saying you're wrong I'm just saying you can't generalize on behalf of every person. Every person's experience of the things you're describing is different. It's not a one size fits all situation, but is highly personal.

    Please define what you mean by universalist.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    You could know a few people in many places quite well but it still lacks that everyday connection to place and community. What you are basically
    Define an "everyday connection".

    [quote=Wessexman;1058015563]The problem with that is even today life is lived locally. We perhaps can talk to those further away more today but we don't live in their worlds still.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I think that it is far better to be immersed in the world of your everyday existence, to build most of your community there than to try and build communal ties with a few people from many different places. It weakens the ties and lessens the benefits and still leaves one rather isolated.
    Wherever I am, that is where I am immersed. That is where my community is, and the people there know me as someone who travels yet still accept me as part of their locale. So you see, I have many communities the world over.

    The ties are not weakened because those people understand the nature of who I am as a traveller, and support my choices. If you are someone like me who believes that relationships transcend distances, then it's a no brainer. It's true that I can't be in contact with everyone at all times or know what is going on in their life at all times, but that would be true even if I were still living there... and I know that if I were to appear in any given community again, I could easily pick up where I left off.

    For you, your neighbour is on your street. For me, my neighbour is in another country. You walk down your street. I take a flight. The only difference is the scale of the experience.

    I think it really depends on the person and on the situation. Again, you are generalizing. I've met travellers who are extremely isolated people because they have led a nomadic life and have not made sincere attempts to make connections with the people in the places they go. They are the loneliest sorts. For me it's kind of the opposite... I feel a sense of community on my entire planet because of everywhere I have lived.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    For instance it is far easier for a strong, community centred village or block to resist a state or a corporation than people isolated all over the country(or world.).
    I think this example is more applicable to statehood, which is not really the focus of our discussion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I think these divisions are often good things. I'm a very particularlist man, I don't believe breaking down borders is often a good thing.
    Division can be a good thing, in fact it is necessary to a degree for good gov't. Mass man is not a route we should go down any further.
    In terms of allocating resources and maintaining heritage, I think boundaries can be a good thing... but when it creates mental divisions of "us vs. them", I find them extremely limiting. This is just the phase of social development that humanity is at though. Mine is a generation in the newly globalized era where transportation and communication between nations is growing.

    I think globalization has worn down the borders a bit, and there are pros and cons to this. It's the pros that I'm really taking advantage of as part of my life experience.

  5. #75
    Dorset Patriot
    Wessexman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia(but my heart is back in Dorset.)
    Last Seen
    04-04-14 @ 01:37 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    8,233

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Orius View Post
    No... you assumed that I only know a little about many places, without bothering to ask. It has nothing to do with my form but an erroneous assumption about my life experience.
    No I assumed it because you are human. It would be very hard for you to really know a place and its community inside out without spending years there.


    While I haven't felt a strong to connection to every place I've been, I don't agree with your point that you need to know an area inside and out in order for it to be important, or to foster community. I knew the city I grew up in inside and out and to this day it is still the place I hold the least sense of community.
    Oh I agree it is not sufficient, simply necessary. I mean I've lived in one part of Sydney for 4 years and not felt community because it isn't here.



    Who it is "owed" to is subjective. I'm not saying you're wrong I'm just saying you can't generalize on behalf of every person. Every person's experience of the things you're describing is different. It's not a one size fits all situation, but is highly personal.
    I meant owed as in what is best for individual and social health. I think there is a subjective element but a large objective and social one as well.
    Please define what you mean by universalist.
    Well I use it rather loosely but simply someone who wants to break down a lot of barriers and have people consider themselves larger and larger units.


    Define an "everyday connection".
    As in you see and experience the people and place in your everyday working and recreational and general existence.

    Wherever I am, that is where I am immersed. That is where my community is, and the people there know me as someone who travels yet still accept me as part of their locale. So you see, I have many communities the world over.
    And you generally won't be able to know these one's as well as would be best if you don't spend a long time there.

    The ties are not weakened because those people understand the nature of who I am as a traveller, and support my choices. If you are someone like me who believes that relationships transcend distances, then it's a no brainer. It's true that I can't be in contact with everyone at all times or know what is going on in their life at all times, but that would be true even if I were still living there... and I know that if I were to appear in any given community again, I could easily pick up where I left off.
    It would be far less true if you lived there. When you live there the culture, region and people form part of your daily existence, if community is present of course.
    For you, your neighbour is on your street. For me, my neighbour is in another country. You walk down your street. I take a flight. The only difference is the scale of the experience.
    Not really. In a proper community my neighbour would know me for years, he'd know the same people I did, he'd know the same land and be of the same culture and local traditions. It would be very different.
    I think it really depends on the person and on the situation. Again, you are generalizing. I've met travellers who are extremely isolated people because they have led a nomadic life and have not made sincere attempts to make connections with the people in the places they go. They are the loneliest sorts. For me it's kind of the opposite... I feel a sense of community on my entire planet because of everywhere I have lived.
    Yes but if you are an outsider who only spends a few months in a place I don't see how you can build the necessary connections to place and people.

    I think this example is more applicable to statehood, which is not really the focus of our discussion.
    I disagree, community should be a key building block of a state or society.

    In terms of allocating resources and maintaining heritage, I think boundaries can be a good thing... but when it creates mental divisions of "us vs. them", I find them extremely limiting. This is just the phase of social development that humanity is at though. Mine is a generation in the newly globalized era where transportation and communication between nations is growing.
    I think a degree of mental divisions are good as long as they don't become too all consuming and narrow. This means that the local people are able to stand up for their rights and liberties against encroachment. I actually think though localism and regionalism help to guard against the "bigoted" and overly negative divisionism that you speak of. They are based on areas far more real to the individual and far less involved in power relations and such. I mean English nationalists are very interested in the power and glory of England measured usually in terms of size, economy and military power and influence but what does a man of Dorset or Wessex care about that. A small-scale patriot is not too interested in whether his region has the greatest armed forces or diplomatic influence but more its culture and society.

    I think globalization has worn down the borders a bit, and there are pros and cons to this. It's the pros that I'm really taking advantage of as part of my life experience.
    The problem is that if one travels to see other local cultures then these will be very negatively effected by attitudes or at least realities that remove cultural significance completely from the local and regional area. It will likely just further the McDonaldisation of these cultures.
    "It is written in the eternal constitution that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." - Edmund Burke

  6. #76
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Last Seen
    12-26-10 @ 05:57 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    8,083

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    No I assumed it because you are human. It would be very hard for you to really know a place and its community inside out without spending years there.
    Our definitions of community conflict then.

    I don't need to know a community inside and out to be part of it and make good connections. I've been in Nanjing for less than a year and already I have some really great friends and we have places we hang out at frequently. What we have is probably temporary but it doesn't make it any less of a community, and once we have gone our separate ways we'll still be in touch. If I go back to Canada, it's not important for me to know what my friend in Nanjing is doing every day, but it's enough for me to think about Nanjing and immediately think of the face of my good friend. I have community here.

    As for really "knowing" a place... it depends on what you want to know and what you wish to accomplish there in the time you have. Any given place has a lot of stuff... I could spend a lifetime in China and still not have scratched the surface if I were just floating about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I meant owed as in what is best for individual and social health. I think there is a subjective element but a large objective and social one as well.
    My definition of community differs from yours and I feel pretty healthy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    Well I use it rather loosely but simply someone who wants to break down a lot of barriers and have people consider themselves larger and larger units.
    What do you mean by larger and larger units?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    As in you see and experience the people and place in your everyday working and recreational and general existence.
    And you generally won't be able to know these one's as well as would be best if you don't spend a long time there.
    I tend to spend a year minimum in the places I go, but even in places where I have spent less time, I've met some great people who I am still in contact with and who want to meet up with me in the future. I don't have to know those people for a long time to still care about them.

    I met a Buddhist in Thailand who said to me: some friendships last a day, and some last lifetimes. Work with the time that you have rather than to focus on not having enough time.

    For me, I don't HAVE to spend years in a place to make important connections with people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    It would be far less true if you lived there. When you live there the culture, region and people form part of your daily existence, if community is present of course.
    Depends on where you live, I suppose, but I have never been in a place where I knew everyone there and, generally, what was going on. Even within communities there are smaller "locales" of people who are tightly woven. Its those niches that I tend to be part of, and the ones I remain connected to after I've left.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    Not really. In a proper community my neighbour would know me for years, he'd know the same people I did, he'd know the same land and be of the same culture and local traditions. It would be very different.
    Again, we have different definitions of what community means to us. I've done this exercise before in an official capacity with an organization I used to volunteer with. We had a round table with people from all over the world, and every one of them had a different definition.

    One size does not fit all, but I respect your definition.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    Yes but if you are an outsider who only spends a few months in a place I don't see how you can build the necessary connections to place and people.
    I found the more I've travelled the easier it has become. A lot of what prevents the connections from happening are things like the initial culture shock, not feeling like you have a secure base for your basic needs, etc. With more travel experience, these things take less of your time, and you get into the local culture much more readily. At least, that is how it has worked for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I think a degree of mental divisions are good as long as they don't become too all consuming and narrow. This means that the local people are able to stand up for their rights and liberties against encroachment. I actually think though localism and regionalism help to guard against the "bigoted" and overly negative divisionism that you speak of. They are based on areas far more real to the individual and far less involved in power relations and such. I mean English nationalists are very interested in the power and glory of England measured usually in terms of size, economy and military power and influence but what does a man of Dorset or Wessex care about that. A small-scale patriot is not too interested in whether his region has the greatest armed forces or diplomatic influence but more its culture and society.
    You're talking more on a political level now... I was talking more on a personal level.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    The problem is that if one travels to see other local cultures then these will be very negatively effected by attitudes or at least realities that remove cultural significance completely from the local and regional area. It will likely just further the McDonaldisation of these cultures.
    It depends on the place, the person going there, and the society at large, really. Even in the most xenophobic places, there are always people who are curious about the outside and, given the chance, would do their own exploring. I find the idea that a locale's culture belongs to it and it alone, and that no other people should "interfere", to be highly arrogant and ignorant. Instead of seeing a traveller as another human being coming to learn about them, they see them as an alien who is nothing like them. Even in xenophobic places, I have managed to have positive interactions with people which make them reconsider their views.

    The other day one of my English students said that he hates the Japanese. All of them, no exception. I asked him, "So, if a Japanese person walked into the room right now, you would hate them?" He said yes. I said, so... what do you think about people who hate the Chinese? All of them, no exception. I said, "Do you think all Chinese deserve to be hated?" He paused. Somehow, this example changed his world view, because it brought the issue home for him.

    If you are talking about corporate powers and big governments engaging in neo-imperialism, that's different. I'm talking about me, alone, travelling to a place.

  7. #77
    Dorset Patriot
    Wessexman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia(but my heart is back in Dorset.)
    Last Seen
    04-04-14 @ 01:37 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    8,233

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Wow, this is getting a very large discussion. Let's try and trim it a little so we both don't have to make so massive postings.

    Our definitions of community conflict then.

    I don't need to know a community inside and out to be part of it and make good connections. I've been in Nanjing for less than a year and already I have some really great friends and we have places we hang out at frequently. What we have is probably temporary but it doesn't make it any less of a community, and once we have gone our separate ways we'll still be in touch. If I go back to Canada, it's not important for me to know what my friend in Nanjing is doing every day, but it's enough for me to think about Nanjing and immediately think of the face of my good friend. I have community here.

    As for really "knowing" a place... it depends on what you want to know and what you wish to accomplish there in the time you have. Any given place has a lot of stuff... I could spend a lifetime in China and still not have scratched the surface if I were just floating about.
    I think you are mistaking having some friends and having real community. Community requires small-scale associations and it requires several of these and for them to be part of your everyday life both ideationally and functionally. This is what ultimately a lot of community is built on. Friendships are important but they are far from what community is in it entirety.
    What do you mean by larger and larger units?
    Well like in Britain we have the peoples who want us to be Europeans and not British with the most extreme believing we should feel citizens of the earth instead of our countries and regions.
    I tend to spend a year minimum in the places I go, but even in places where I have spent less time, I've met some great people who I am still in contact with and who want to meet up with me in the future. I don't have to know those people for a long time to still care about them.
    I think your mistaking friendship and community.

    Depends on where you live, I suppose, but I have never been in a place where I knew everyone there and, generally, what was going on. Even within communities there are smaller "locales" of people who are tightly woven. Its those niches that I tend to be part of, and the ones I remain connected to after I've left.
    I understand what you are saying, I just don't feel it is the best sociologically stable method for large amounts of people. You are a rolling stone it seems but I don't think a sound foundation can be built if there are more than a minority of those.



    If you are talking about corporate powers and big governments engaging in neo-imperialism, that's different. I'm talking about me, alone, travelling to a place.
    I'm more talking of what is a general firm foundations for cultural and community health. I think it is fine you are a traveler, there have always been such people but I feel they must be a minority and in fact can only really gain a lot of what they do because most people have in the past been more attached and immersed in their local community and place than others.
    "It is written in the eternal constitution that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." - Edmund Burke

  8. #78
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Last Seen
    12-26-10 @ 05:57 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    8,083

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    Wow, this is getting a very large discussion. Let's try and trim it a little so we both don't have to make so massive postings.
    If you prefer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I think you are mistaking having some friends and having real community. Community requires small-scale associations and it requires several of these and for them to be part of your everyday life both ideationally and functionally. This is what ultimately a lot of community is built on. Friendships are important but they are far from what community is in it entirety.
    I never limited my examples to friends, my examples just included friends. Again, your definition of community is different than mine, and that's okay.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    Well like in Britain we have the peoples who want us to be Europeans and not British with the most extreme believing we should feel citizens of the earth instead of our countries and regions.
    I think your mistaking friendship and community.
    No, I'm not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I understand what you are saying, I just don't feel it is the best sociologically stable method for large amounts of people. You are a rolling stone it seems but I don't think a sound foundation can be built if there are more than a minority of those.
    Maybe... but I wasn't really discussing what was best for everyone else, I was just giving a personal, anecdotal example of my own life, and then you disagreed with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wessexman View Post
    I'm more talking of what is a general firm foundations for cultural and community health. I think it is fine you are a traveler, there have always been such people but I feel they must be a minority and in fact can only really gain a lot of what they do because most people have in the past been more attached and immersed in their local community and place than others.
    I've been lucky because I've had the means to go to many places, and by means I don't just mean money, but also opportunity. My neighbour and I were talking about exactly what you just said a couple of months ago. She said that every society has people who leave and people who stay, and that the people who stay are the ones that maintain the foundation and are the keepers of the community's history, while the people who leave are the new knowledge seekers who eventually return home to share their wisdom with the community.

    I sort of agree with her... but I think with globalization, more and more people will have the chance to be the seekers. I don't know what this would mean in terms of long term consequences for local communities. Even within individual countries, big cities are absorbing smaller scale developments and most of the world now lives in big cities. Maybe it's just the way things are meant to go.

  9. #79
    Dorset Patriot
    Wessexman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia(but my heart is back in Dorset.)
    Last Seen
    04-04-14 @ 01:37 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    8,233

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Orius View Post
    Maybe... but I wasn't really discussing what was best for everyone else, I was just giving a personal, anecdotal example of my own life, and then you disagreed with it.
    Well I'm more talking from a sociological and political perspective.

    I've been lucky because I've had the means to go to many places, and by means I don't just mean money, but also opportunity. My neighbour and I were talking about exactly what you just said a couple of months ago. She said that every society has people who leave and people who stay, and that the people who stay are the ones that maintain the foundation and are the keepers of the community's history, while the people who leave are the new knowledge seekers who eventually return home to share their wisdom with the community.
    I agree here.

    I sort of agree with her... but I think with globalization, more and more people will have the chance to be the seekers. I don't know what this would mean in terms of long term consequences for local communities. Even within individual countries, big cities are absorbing smaller scale developments and most of the world now lives in big cities. Maybe it's just the way things are meant to go.
    I doubt the long term sustainability of globalisation but ignoring that I think that without the foundations the knowledge seekers are cut off from gaining knowledge and from transmitting it.

    Anyway interesting chat.
    "It is written in the eternal constitution that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." - Edmund Burke

  10. #80
    User Analyst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Last Seen
    09-16-09 @ 04:49 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    131

    Re: Do You Belong Here?

    I admit to feeling as though I don't really fit in America.

    1) I hate sports.

    2) Etiquette and courtesy are extremely important to me.

    3) I reject Consumerism.

    4) Very few people I meet are truly worth befriending (and most of those are Christian).

    5) We're a culture of "it's all about..me!" (Yes, I'm guilty of it, too)

    6) It's hard to shake the feeling that most people are either stupid, spoiled, or both.

    7) I'm not competitive, I'd prefer to cooperate but it's amazing how little of this actually occurs in our culture.

    8) We're so inundated with marketing, it's difficult to know what actually influences us. As much as I reject consumerism, I find myself humming catcy jingles to myself, in spite of my repulsion - which is exactly why marketing works. The average number of ads viewed per day is some ridiculous number over 1000, link if you're curious. Theory of media literacy: a ... - Google Book Search

    9) Most people are so brainwashed, I actually find myself ostracized at times simply because I am unafraid to assert myself in refusing to engage in popular American activities (watching sports, television, shopping, etc).

    10) It's unbelievably easy to get ripped off, from just about every direction.

Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •