View Poll Results: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

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Thread: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

  1. #21
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Crovax View Post
    Seems like they think banning them isnt an option
    Not true. He clearly says the following

    We could imagine circumstances in which a conspiracy theory became so pervasive, and so dangerous, that censorship would be thinkable.

  2. #22
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    And he advocates the use of "counter speech" (read=government propaganda) to controlling what they dismiss as theories.
    He does indeed. But we cannot discount the FACT that he clearly said that it conspiracy theorizing could become such a threat that banning it altogether becomes thinkable. Of this there is no doubt.

  3. #23
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Mind control, I don't like it at all.

  4. #24
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    He does indeed. But we cannot discount the FACT that he clearly said that it conspiracy theorizing could become such a threat that banning it altogether becomes thinkable. Of this there is no doubt.
    There's no part of domestic government surveillance that I like, except upon open and credible evidence that a person or group is planing to harm an American or Americans.

    The president may now order warrantless surveillance, including a new capability to force companies and organizations to turn over information on citizens’ finances, communications and associations. Bush acquired this sweeping power under the Patriot Act in 2001, and in 2011, Obama extended the power, including searches of everything from business documents to library records. The government can use “national security letters” to demand, without probable cause, that organizations turn over information on citizens — and order them not to reveal the disclosure to the affected party. (Saudi Arabia and Pakistan operate under laws that allow the government to engage in widespread discretionary surveillance.)
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lovebug View Post
    Mind control, I don't like it at all.
    Neither do I. And remember, this is from a guy who is a close advisor to the so called "change we can believe in" President. I really think Obama needs to come forward and make some sort of statement on how he feels about this type of thinking. Honestly, until today, I had no idea this is actually the type of thinking that his advisors engage in. Very, very disturbing.

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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    There's no part of domestic government surveillance that I like, except upon open and credible evidence that a person or group is planing to harm an American or Americans.

    The president may now order warrantless surveillance, including a new capability to force companies and organizations to turn over information on citizens’ finances, communications and associations. Bush acquired this sweeping power under the Patriot Act in 2001, and in 2011, Obama extended the power, including searches of everything from business documents to library records. The government can use “national security letters” to demand, without probable cause, that organizations turn over information on citizens — and order them not to reveal the disclosure to the affected party. (Saudi Arabia and Pakistan operate under laws that allow the government to engage in widespread discretionary surveillance.)
    And add on top of all that, they can throw you in jail indefinitely if they think you are a threat. What this country is coming to is very disturbing.

  7. #27
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    Neither do I. And remember, this is from a guy who is a close advisor to the so called "change we can believe in" President. I really think Obama needs to come forward and make some sort of statement on how he feels about this type of thinking. Honestly, until today, I had no idea this is actually the type of thinking that his advisors engage in. Very, very disturbing.
    Check out Jonathan Turleys 10 points that have transformed America. All ten of which are continuations of Bush administration establishments.
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

  8. #28
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    There's no part of domestic government surveillance that I like, except upon open and credible evidence that a person or group is planing to harm an American or Americans.

    The president may now order warrantless surveillance, including a new capability to force companies and organizations to turn over information on citizens’ finances, communications and associations. Bush acquired this sweeping power under the Patriot Act in 2001, and in 2011, Obama extended the power, including searches of everything from business documents to library records. The government can use “national security letters” to demand, without probable cause, that organizations turn over information on citizens — and order them not to reveal the disclosure to the affected party. (Saudi Arabia and Pakistan operate under laws that allow the government to engage in widespread discretionary surveillance.)
    A noble idea coming up, fair warning.
    Instead of spying on citizens and digging for whatever suits their notion of a theoretical threat, how about disproving conspiracies with actual facts, as in FOIA?

  9. #29
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    And add on top of all that, they can throw you in jail indefinitely if they think you are a threat. What this country is coming to is very disturbing.
    Indeed, that too is on Turleys list!!!!
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

  10. #30
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    Re: Should the government ban conspiracy theorizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lovebug View Post
    A noble idea coming up, fair warning.
    Instead of spying on citizens and digging for whatever suits their notion of a theoretical threat, how about disproving conspiracies with actual facts, as in FOIA?
    Wouldn't that be wonderful!
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

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