View Poll Results: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

Voters
217. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    108 49.77%
  • No

    70 32.26%
  • Maybe/not sure

    26 11.98%
  • Other

    13 5.99%
Page 25 of 86 FirstFirst ... 1523242526273575 ... LastLast
Results 241 to 250 of 852

Thread: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?[W:296, 650]

  1. #241
    Sage
    Montecresto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Seen
    03-13-16 @ 10:59 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    24,561

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hays View Post
    Again, old scholarship rendered obsolete by Giangreco.
    A revisionist, and American apologist.
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

  2. #242
    Sage

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 05:45 PM
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    41,880

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert in Ohio View Post
    The other country (Iran) in this case, just as we "allowed" Israel to have nuclear weapons and have "allowed" N Korea to do so
    and you think it is therefore a good reason to condone proliferation?

  3. #243
    Traveler

    Jack Hays's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamsburg, Virginia
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    52,934
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    A revisionist, and American apologist.
    I suggest you study the research and get back to me.
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

  4. #244
    Advisor Robert in Ohio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Last Seen
    07-31-15 @ 07:25 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    315

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by joG View Post
    Legally the answer is, as far as I know, simple. They presently are not allowed to have or develop nuclear weapons.

    Do they have the right outside the law? Well, that depends. If they take it and the International community allows it to happen?

    In any case they would have them and the world would be a somewhat more dangerous place.
    And if they were to withdraw their ratification of the NPT, they would no longer be subject to its restrictions and the current regime could argue that ratification of that treaty was by a prior rogue regime not in the best interests of the country. Changing things that prior administrations have done is how progress is made in politics after all (at least in the eyes of those in power at the time)

  5. #245
    Advisor Robert in Ohio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Last Seen
    07-31-15 @ 07:25 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    315

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by joG View Post
    and you think it is therefore a good reason to condone proliferation?
    Not all and if you read my comments on the thread you would understand that my position is simply that it is not the U.S.'s responsibility or right to dictate to the rest of the world about how things should be done in sovereign countries. That is colonialism and we fought a revolution to get out from under the domination of an established world power.

  6. #246
    Sage
    Montecresto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Seen
    03-13-16 @ 10:59 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    24,561

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hays View Post
    I suggest you study the research and get back to me.
    You've been proven wrong more times than once in this topic that you're utterly ill schooled in. Thanks for playing, again Jack.
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

  7. #247
    Traveler

    Jack Hays's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamsburg, Virginia
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    52,934
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    You've been proven wrong more times than once in this topic that you're utterly ill schooled in. Thanks for playing, again Jack.
    Book Reviews
    Hell to Pay: Operation DOWNFALL and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947, by D. M. Giangreco
    Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2009. Pp. xxiii, 416. Illus., maps, notes, biblio., index. $36.95. ISBN: 1591143160.

    Central to any discussion of the necessity for the use of the atomic bomb to help bring about an end to the Second World War in the Pacific is the issue of the projected cost in blood of an Allied invasion of the Japanese home islands. Nevertheless, with the exception of John Skates' 1994 book Invasion of Japan: Alternative to the Bomb, this critical question has been largely unexamined. As a result both sides of in the debate have passionately argued their positions with a shocking level of ignorance. Building on his earlier work on the subject, in Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947, military historian D.M. Giangreco, author of The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman and many other works, provides a welcome investigation of the costs of an invasion of the Japanese home islands based on a careful examination of the invasion plans and defense preparations. This work succeeds because it provides a detailed understanding of the military calculations of both sides during the final days of the war, which leads to an evaluation of the likely course of an Allied invasion.
    Giangreco argues cogently that the Japanese armed forces were relatively confident in their ability to resist an Allied invasion. The Japanese had accumulated thousands of kamikaze aircraft, far more than the Allies had estimated, many of which were older models that were nearly invisible to radar, plus a wide variety of suicide naval craft, an army of approximately three million men, and a rapidly expanding home defense force. What Japan lacked in quality and power projection, it made up for in numbers and a fierce dedication to the defense of the homeland. Although most Japanese planners anticipated heavy losses, some estimating as many as 20 million dead, they believed that they could extract so high a price in blood from the Allies that they would be able to secure an acceptable end to the war.
    Alternatively, Giangreco depicts the Allies as confident in their ability to win, but deeply concerned regarding the costs of their victory, citing, for example, Marine Major General Graves B. Erskine, who remarked, "[V]ictory was never in doubt. Its cost was. What was in doubt, in all our minds, was whether there would be any of us left to dedicate our cemetery at the end, or whether the last Marine would die knocking out the last Japanese gun and gunner." This fatalism was underscored by American defense planners who ordered an additional 500,000 Purple Heart decorations made in anticipation of massive losses, a stockpile so large it proved sufficient to cover American casualties in wars over the next 50 years.
    According to Giangreco, the atomic bombs were a clear blessing because they ended the "mutual suicide pact" and almost certainly saved lives on both sides. Although this claim will offend and shock some readers, the wealth of primary source evidence provided by Giangreco clearly supports this assertion. While this work is very detailed and technical in places, it is well written and will keep readers engaged with its sense of impending disaster. This book is a must read for any student of World War II, whether scholar or interested citizen, and will likely remain the standard work on the subject for years to come.
    Reviewer: J. Furman Daniel, III -- jfdaniel@gmail.com
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

  8. #248
    Traveler

    Jack Hays's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamsburg, Virginia
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    52,934
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    You've been proven wrong more times than once in this topic that you're utterly ill schooled in. Thanks for playing, again Jack.
    Just another in your string of unsupported claims.
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

  9. #249
    Sage

    ocean515's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Southern California
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    24,705

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    Quote Originally Posted by Montecresto View Post
    You've been proven wrong more times than once in this topic that you're utterly ill schooled in. Thanks for playing, again Jack.
    I think it's quite reasonable to conclude that someone who ends up referring to others as freaks and pigs lost the debate long ago.

  10. #250
    Sage
    Montecresto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Seen
    03-13-16 @ 10:59 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    24,561

    Re: Does Iran have a "Right" to Nuclear Weapons?

    [QUOTE=joG;1064420825]and you think it is therefore a good reason to condone proliferation?[

    No, it's not, although the CFR has presented an argument for Iranian nuclear weapons. The point is picking and choosing who does and who doesn't. Pakistan is no stable country, but they are a nuclear power.
    Killing one person is murder, killing 100,000 is foreign policy

Page 25 of 86 FirstFirst ... 1523242526273575 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •