View Poll Results: Is there a moral obligation to repay money you borrow?

Voters
319. You may not vote on this poll
  • If you borrow money, you are morally obligated to repay it.

    110 34.48%
  • I feel no moral obligation to repay loans I've taken out

    209 65.52%
Page 45 of 91 FirstFirst ... 35434445464755 ... LastLast
Results 441 to 450 of 906

Thread: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?[W:461]

  1. #441
    Sage
    sangha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lower Hudson Valley, NY
    Last Seen
    09-17-17 @ 05:48 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    59,990

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    This is gold. Pure gold!!! Someone who normally portrays them self as being so concerned with facts suddenly doesn't care about facts after being proven wrong.
    Even you have agreed that whether or not the lender has to go to court is nothing but "tangential" to the matter and even "a red herring"

    Please explain why should I be concerned about tangential red herrings?
    Quote Originally Posted by matchlight View Post
    Justice Thomas' opinions consistently contain precise, detailed constitutional analyses.
    Quote Originally Posted by jaeger19 View Post
    the vast majority of folks that need healthcare are on Medicare.. both rich and poor..

  2. #442
    Sage
    Papa bull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Midwest
    Last Seen
    06-25-15 @ 01:35 PM
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    6,927

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    He does that often. I think because it seriously amuses him to be argumentative and get other people all wound up. Topic is often irrelevant. In this thread, though, I sense that he is being sincere. Repugnant, but sincere.
    It's so transparent that at this point, I see no point in responding to his drivel any more. But I do suspect you are right about his sincerity. It's good to know that liberals can be sincere about SOMETHING even if it's just about the degree of their sociopathy.
    You can't reason anyone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into in the first place.

  3. #443
    Sage
    polgara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Last Seen
    Today @ 11:06 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    18,356

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    This thread saddens me. I guess it shouldn't, as I should be used to gross rationalizations, but it does.

    People are bending over backwards to disassociate themselves from the act of borrowing. By their reasoning (spin, really), if the act of borrowing is a separate act, then it is "amoral" because a non-human act doesn't have a conscience. The non-human act can do whatever it wants. That leaves their conscience free and clear.

    Problem is, the issue doesn't have anything whatsoever to do with the act specifically, and everything to do with one's own promise to repay*. The promise on on YOU, and only you. They're only kidding themselves when they try to spin it away.

    This mindset is not unlike the thinking behind civil asset forfeiture. The person doesn't have to be burdened with guilt/innocence. No, the property is guilty. This is the only way they... enforcers in this case... can spin it wildly enough to justify it in their own conscience.

    Point 2: Prior to this thread I would not have guessed that political lean would be so definitive on an issue like this. That has been eye-opening.


    *- Disclaimer: Dire circumstances requiring bankruptcy and similar not included. There are legitimate times when circumstances spin out of a person's control, but those are the exception, not the general rule.
    Good morning, radcen.

    In some cases, such as when the ability to repay a loan becomes impossible because of job loss or illness, or because a "teaser" interest rate was used and the real rate kicks in at a later date, I can understand walking away when you know you aren't going to be able to keep your word. You're still responsible and your credit rating will suffer even though you didn't mean for it to happen.

    We had a case in our town where a family bought a great house with an above-ground swimming pool that was surrounded by a large enough deck that lounge chairs and tables were located there. My son-in-law knew the people that lived next door, so we were kept apprised of what was going on. Those people did not keep the house in good shape - they didn't paint the exterior when it badly needed it, and it started looking shabby. What they did do was tear the deck down and sold the wood, then emptied the pool and sold it. They apparently made sporadic house payments for a while then stopped paying altogether. They always had a new car, though, but it sat outside because they had also torn down a fairly new two car detached garage and sold it in pieces. They didn't replant the grass to improve the appearance but left big ugly holes where the pool and the garage used to be. It was an eyesore, and they eventually just walked away from the property - after gutting the interior of all the kitchen cupboards and lighting fixtures in the house that had been there when they moved in, and sold those, too. How they ever got a loan from any lending company is unknown, but the husband did have a job. They left the property a total mess when they left the area, though, which lowered the value of other houses around them. The bank has lowered the selling price by half, but no one is interested in buying it. This was a fairly high-priced neighborhood, too - not a ghetto. What do you do with ***holes like that if they move in next door to you, since it's against the law to kill them? I wonder who they will scam next?

  4. #444
    Sage

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Last Seen
    Today @ 05:42 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    23,401

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by CanadaJohn View Post
    You clearly don't know what you're talking about. As for banks lending you money to buy stocks, many banks have brokerages that will allow clients to purchase stocks on margin provided they have collateral to back up their credit worthiness. Then, when the margin comes due, they either sell the stock at a profit, the margin satisfied by the sale, or they sell the stock at a loss and pay the balance from the client's own funds.
    Buying on margin is not a 30 year mortgage. Try again

  5. #445
    Canadian Conservative
    CanadaJohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Last Seen
    Today @ 09:27 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    27,207

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by sangha View Post
    The agreement obligates the lender to accept the collateral to satisfy the loan....The contract specifies that the loan can be satisfied by either paying the lender cash on a set schedule of some sort, or through foreclosure on the collateral.
    It matters little how often you repeat this bull****, it's still bull****. The sad part is you're fully aware it's bull**** and you continue to troll it out there.
    "Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views." William F. Buckley Jr.

  6. #446
    Canadian Conservative
    CanadaJohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Last Seen
    Today @ 09:27 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    27,207

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by whysoserious View Post
    CanadaJohn, this discussion started well before the thread. You are just a superficial addition to a discussion that was going on way before you got here.
    We're all superficial in that respect. I've been dumped on frequently enough for tangentially referring to similar or linked topics in a thread and I've no interest in playing that game again. You are, however, free to do so.
    "Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views." William F. Buckley Jr.

  7. #447
    Canadian Conservative
    CanadaJohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Last Seen
    Today @ 09:27 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    27,207

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by iguanaman View Post
    Buying on margin is not a 30 year mortgage. Try again
    It's a loan - who said the OP was solely about mortgages? Doesn't change the fact you don't know what you're talking about.
    "Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views." William F. Buckley Jr.

  8. #448
    Sage
    Papa bull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Midwest
    Last Seen
    06-25-15 @ 01:35 PM
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    6,927

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by polgara View Post
    Good morning, radcen.

    In some cases, such as when the ability to repay a loan becomes impossible because of job loss or illness, or because a "teaser" interest rate was used and the real rate kicks in at a later date, I can understand walking away when you know you aren't going to be able to keep your word. You're still responsible and your credit rating will suffer even though you didn't mean for it to happen.

    We had a case in our town where a family bought a great house with an above-ground swimming pool that was surrounded by a large enough deck that lounge chairs and tables were located there. My son-in-law knew the people that lived next door, so we were kept apprised of what was going on. Those people did not keep the house in good shape - they didn't paint the exterior when it badly needed it, and it started looking shabby. What they did do was tear the deck down and sold the wood, then emptied the pool and sold it. They apparently made sporadic house payments for a while then stopped paying altogether. They always had a new car, though, but it sat outside because they had also torn down a fairly new two car detached garage and sold it in pieces. They didn't replant the grass to improve the appearance but left big ugly holes where the pool and the garage used to be. It was an eyesore, and they eventually just walked away from the property - after gutting the interior of all the kitchen cupboards and lighting fixtures in the house that had been there when they moved in, and sold those, too. How they ever got a loan from any lending company is unknown, but the husband did have a job. They left the property a total mess when they left the area, though, which lowered the value of other houses around them. The bank has lowered the selling price by half, but no one is interested in buying it. This was a fairly high-priced neighborhood, too - not a ghetto. What do you do with ***holes like that if they move in next door to you, since it's against the law to kill them? I wonder who they will scam next?
    Indeed. It turns out that over 25% of all the mortgage defaults that fueled "The Great Recession" were "strategic defaults" where the homeowner COULD have paid and simply decided to walk away from their obligations because their "investment" wasn't worth what they thought it was going to be worth. They stuck everyone else with the cost of cleaning up the mess for their unprofitable "investment" decision and they did it willingly and by choice despite having the funds to make good.

    I ended up cashing out some of my 401K to pay the difference when I had to sell the home I bought in 2004 for 192,000 (After making every single mortgage payment for 8 years) for only 160,000. It cost me a lot of money because the house had lost so much value. I suppose I could have just "walked away" since I bought the home I live in now with cash from the early IRA distribution (that cost me a bundle, too), but I'm not a thief and I agreed to the mortgage in good faith and even though it was hard, I did have the means to discharge my obligation. It cost me thousands and thousands of dollars but how can people put a price on their honesty and integrity? I don't know. I just know that somehow a lot of parents failed to teach their children about values and morals and this country and this generation will end up taking the wheel and steering the ship soon. It's not something to be optimistic about.
    You can't reason anyone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into in the first place.

  9. #449
    Living in Gods country


    JANFU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Liberal
    Posts
    17,946

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by Papa bull View Post
    LOL. That's what I figure most lefties would say. "screw 'em, let them keep the house (or car or TV or furniture) since it isn't worth what I paid for it".
    Corps go belly up-
    Often restructuring keeps the company in business. So those assets in the newly restructured company were then paid for with pennies on the dollar.
    Workers and pensioners are bottom of the list.
    But then again, all those companies must have been run by Lefties. Right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Fenton View Post
    Hillary is the only defense I or anyone else needs.
    Quote Originally Posted by apdst View Post
    Not once have I showed my dick to a woman and she thought it was creepy. In fact, in 100% of the cases, they were pretty excited about it. I don't know who you're showing your **** too.

  10. #450
    Sage
    Papa bull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Midwest
    Last Seen
    06-25-15 @ 01:35 PM
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    6,927

    Re: Are you morally obligated to repay a loan that you take?

    Quote Originally Posted by JANFU View Post
    Corps go belly up-
    Often restructuring keeps the company in business. So those assets in the newly restructured company were then paid for with pennies on the dollar.
    Workers and pensioners are bottom of the list.
    But then again, all those companies must have been run by Lefties. Right?
    Maybe they were run by lefties. Unless, of course, you figure lefties aren't capable of running a business, (a very unflattering assumption) you'd have to assume that it's quite possible.

    But which political lean is the least moral wasn't really the point, was it? That was just an interesting revelation as a reulst of this discussion. The point here is...... Do YOU feel that it is immoral to decide to renege and welsh on your debts and contracts if it suits you? "Well, THEY did it, too." isn't an answer or a justification.
    You can't reason anyone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into in the first place.

Page 45 of 91 FirstFirst ... 35434445464755 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •