View Poll Results: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read first

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    120 82.76%
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    11 7.59%
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Thread: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read first

  1. #31
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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by americanwoman View Post
    Just to be an instigator even Osama Bin Laden?
    Even Osama Bin Laden. I don't have any emotional attachment to currency. It's just a legal means of trading imo. I don't associate a dollar bill with anything of greatness- just commerce.
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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by X Factor View Post
    The U.S. Govt has tried several times to get us to accept a dollar coin and we won't, but I think Americans would warn to a coin like the pound. There something oddly satisfying about paying with those, like you're in a whole other time period where you can get practically anything with just a pocket of change.
    I think so too. I say get rid of the penny and make a $1 coin. There is something nice about it, especially when it's heftier than the lesser value coins. I think if they gave a little more attention to design in that way, maaaybe Americans would eventually warm to it.

    Less waste too. Although dollars are quite tough, they will certainly never last as long as metal, and pennies are just something to wind up in your couch cushion these days.

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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeAndMirrors View Post
    I think so too. I say get rid of the penny and make a $1 coin. There is something nice about it, especially when it's heftier than the lesser value coins. I think if they gave a little more attention to design in that way, maaaybe Americans would eventually warm to it.

    Less waste too. Although dollars are quite tough, they will certainly never last as long as metal, and pennies are just something to wind up in your couch cushion these days.
    I think I remember seeing somewhere that pennies cost more to make now than what they're worth.

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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeAndMirrors View Post
    I think so too. I say get rid of the penny and make a $1 coin. There is something nice about it, especially when it's heftier than the lesser value coins. I think if they gave a little more attention to design in that way, maaaybe Americans would eventually warm to it.

    Less waste too. Although dollars are quite tough, they will certainly never last as long as metal, and pennies are just something to wind up in your couch cushion these days.
    I disagree. We've tried dollar coins, and Americans simply don't want them. Not sure why, but other societies liking similar concepts there doesn't mean anything here. I think the added weight in pockets and purses is a factor.

    If forced on us (and $1 bill eliminated), people will get used to them simply because there will be no alternative, but that's not the same as acceptance or preference.
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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by X Factor View Post
    I think I remember seeing somewhere that pennies cost more to make now than what they're worth.
    Why am I not surprised?

    Down with the penny!

  6. #36
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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Fredrick Douglas, Nat Turner, Harriet Tubman, Martian Luther King Jr and so on.

    Before anyone says we only put presidents on our currency, Here are some examples-

    Ben Franklin $100 and a .50 coin
    Alexander Hamilton $10
    Susan B Anthony $1
    Sacagawea $1
    Chief Onepapa: $5 silver certificate
    Daniel Webster: $10 United States note
    Lews & Clark: $10 United States Note
    VP Thomas Hendricks: $10 Silver Certificate
    Michael Hillegas, 1st US Treasurer: $10 Gold Certificate
    Former Treasury Secretary Hugh McCulloch: $20 National Bank Note
    Former Comptroller of the currency John J. Knox, $50 National Bank Note
    Thomas Hart Benton, $100 Gold Certificate
    Former Chief Justice John Marshall, $500 Federal Reserve Note
    Various 1st ladies on $10 dollar gold coins
    Booker T. Washinton .50 cent commemorative coin



    I say yes. Their contributions to this country are just as important as the other people we put on our currency.PLus if we can put state symbols, animals and other things on our currency surely we can put black civil rights and other historical figures on our currency.
    Booker T. Washington was black. But I see nothing wrong in it. However I would like it to be a coin or something in use today.
    This Reform Party member thinks it is high past time that we start electing Americans to congress and the presidency who put America first and their political party further down the line. But for way too long we have been electing Republicans and Democrats who happen to be Americans instead of Americans who happen to be Republicans and Democrats.

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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Fredrick Douglas, Nat Turner, Harriet Tubman, Martian Luther King Jr and so on.

    Before anyone says we only put presidents on our currency, Here are some examples-

    Ben Franklin $100 and a .50 coin
    Alexander Hamilton $10
    Susan B Anthony $1
    Sacagawea $1
    Chief Onepapa: $5 silver certificate
    Daniel Webster: $10 United States note
    Lews & Clark: $10 United States Note
    VP Thomas Hendricks: $10 Silver Certificate
    Michael Hillegas, 1st US Treasurer: $10 Gold Certificate
    Former Treasury Secretary Hugh McCulloch: $20 National Bank Note
    Former Comptroller of the currency John J. Knox, $50 National Bank Note
    Thomas Hart Benton, $100 Gold Certificate
    Former Chief Justice John Marshall, $500 Federal Reserve Note
    Various 1st ladies on $10 dollar gold coins
    Booker T. Washinton .50 cent commemorative coin



    I say yes. Their contributions to this country are just as important as the other people we put on our currency.PLus if we can put state symbols, animals and other things on our currency surely we can put black civil rights and other historical figures on our currency.
    There is a black civil rights leader on one of the coins you listed. Booker T. Washington, on the 50 cent commemorative coin.

    And though he is the only one, there were four African American Registers of the Treasury whose signatures appeared on currency. They were Blanche K. Bruce, Judson W. Lyons, William T. Vernon and James C. Napier. Until the series 1923 currency, the two signatures on almost all currency were of the Treasurer and the Register. During this period four of the 17 registers were African American. The fifth African American whose signature appeared on currency was Azie Taylor Morton. Morton was the 36th Treasurer of the United States. She served from September 12, 1977, to January 20, 1981.

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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    I disagree. We've tried dollar coins, and Americans simply don't want them. Not sure why, but other societies liking similar concepts there doesn't mean anything here. I think the added weight in pockets and purses is a factor.

    If forced on us (and $1 bill eliminated), people will get used to them simply because there will be no alternative, but that's not the same as acceptance or preference.
    I think it's a trade off, really.

    You get rid of 1 and 2 coins pretty quickly, because you build up enough to pay for something pretty quickly. With small bills, it's tempting to just keep using bigger ones until you wind up with a billion $1 bills in your wallet to the point where it looks like you got a butt cheek implant.

    I know it hasn't gone over well in the US in the past, and perhaps it never will. But there's definitely something nice about the thicker coins of higher value, I think. Its design is part of why I like it. You don't really have to even look at it to get the correct change -- it's just obvious by touch which ones are the higher value coins.

    The smaller value ones make no sense at all in terms of size or weight, but 1 and 2 coins do.

  9. #39
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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeAndMirrors View Post
    I think it's a trade off, really.

    You get rid of 1 and 2 coins pretty quickly, because you build up enough to pay for something pretty quickly. With small bills, it's tempting to just keep using bigger ones until you wind up with a billion $1 bills in your wallet to the point where it looks like you got a butt cheek implant.

    I know it hasn't gone over well in the US in the past, and perhaps it never will. But there's definitely something nice about the thicker coins of higher value, I think. Its design is part of why I like it. You don't really have to even look at it to get the correct change -- it's just obvious by touch which ones are the higher value coins.

    The smaller value ones make no sense at all in terms of size or weight, but 1 and 2 coins do.
    I don't disagree, and from an objective standpoint coins for smaller denominations make infinite sense, but I just don't see it happening anytime soon. *I* know it makes sense, but even I don't want to eliminate $1 bills.

    We did have larger $1 coins in the Silver Dollar, but that didn't take off. Was considered more of a novelty to be hoarded. To be fair, that was a few decades ago, of course.
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  10. #40
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    Re: Should we put black civil rights and historical figures on our currency? Read fir

    Quote Originally Posted by Kobie View Post
    Why not?
    You got two likes for having the chutzpah to ask?

    I like that...and so, I shall explain.

    Are we doing this to honor or to appease and what is the motivation, more appeasement? Because to me the "honor" reeks of condescension.

    If to honor are we certain it is an honor or will it be an addition to the hagiography of that individual? For instance, does everyone here know Rosa Parks wasn't some little old black lady with tired feet but an activist heavily involved in the civil rights movement? That MLK was hoisted up as a figurehead which thanks to his oratory skills and calls of non-violence made whites at that time more comfortable with the situation all the while plenty more unknown faces contributed and sacrificed much more to the movement?

    Why limit it to only blacks? And why at this time is this question being brought up? and what "contributions" exactly to society as a whole did these "civil rights" leaders bring?

    Nat Turner for leading a slave rebellion which ended in 60 deaths? and Freddie Douglas, for what? For being literate? For telling his harrowing tale? If killing white people was a celebratory cause I'd much rather see Crazy Horse or Sitting Bull or Geronimo even replace old Ben on the C-note.

    Truth be told, I can't remember the last time I actually held cash, and I don't see myself changing this policy anytime soon. My contention with the whole thing deals with the motivation behind it, the whole thing seems a bit patronizing...

    *and to come back to this -- Why mention race at all if this is truly about contributions to society? Does it matter? What about Cesar Chavez? Doesn't he merit? How many lives did his work help to improve? But it's gotta be black's we single out for merit why? Because they are black moreso than because of their contribution.

    Had this been a question about putting people who contributed to society on our money, than I'd say, great, but when you isolate it to a single race, well, to me that's racist and goes against the words of MLK's dream of judging by the content of their character and not the color of their skin.
    Last edited by ChezC3; 01-20-15 at 01:59 PM.
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