View Poll Results: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

Voters
49. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, it's a bad thing. Everybody should vote.

    20 40.82%
  • It's not bad, but we should still encourage everybody to vote.

    9 18.37%
  • No, it's not a bad thing. Leave people alone.

    13 26.53%
  • Other.

    7 14.29%
Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678
Results 71 to 78 of 78

Thread: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

  1. #71
    Professor
    oneworld2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Seen
    05-25-17 @ 06:10 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Left
    Posts
    1,958

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by sawdust View Post
    1, You didn't answer the question. What the hell does bringing change mean?
    It means , to me , a new more inclusive/meaningful political system and new policies that better serve the bulk of the people instead of sustaining a small and rich elites power from which they derive even more wealth and even more power

    2, Things are as they are supposed to be. We get the government we deserve.
    That's right , if we allow the status quo to continue without a challenge then we surely deserve all we get
    3, You are missing the point. An individual voter can't claim responsibility for what the government does or doesn't do so your question is pointless. I think it would be nice if everyone paid attention and participated. The truth is that more people want to see Kim Kardashian naked than go to the polls. That's ok, the rest of us will do the heavy lifting.
    I never meant to infer that with my comments. I stated that voting in a rigged system , imo , gives it a legitimacy that it doesn't deserve. At least when it's referred to as a vibrant democracy.

    Whilst the politicians and others might bemoan a lack of voter enthusiasm in public , I'm fairly sure that generally speaking and apart from self interest with regards to their personal careers , they privately are thrilled that the WMDs of " popular culture " play such an important role in distracting people away from political activism and inclusion.

    An apathetic electorate isn't going to make things difficult for them to maintain their control and profiteering , is it ?

    4. No other president, Republican or Democrat has ever has his clock cleaned like in the recent midterm and come out to say that two thirds of the voters who didn't vote would have given him a majority. That's delusional crazy talk. It's certainly beneath a President but I'm not surprised it came from Barry O.
    I don't know if that's true or not , I live in the uk.

    But making lame excuses for poor performances I would have thought is just common currency regardless of who it is and what their profession is
    Last edited by oneworld2; 11-14-14 at 06:40 PM.
    There never has been a peace process, but rather an annexation process that used the “peace process” as a facade

  2. #72
    Sage
    chromium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    A2
    Last Seen
    06-05-17 @ 10:53 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    16,968

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    It's bad for those who want "power by the just consent of the governed," in that "none of the above" winning seriously undermines any legit claim to public office, or that office even existing. I've heard that once upon a time, senators were revered instead of reviled. Today's politicians i wouldn't show any special respect for if i met them on the street, that's for sure. I don't consider laws to be valid simply because these dynastic overlords pass them. I definitely feel our democracy has failed, and not just because most of those who do vote are morons.

    Back in the super close 2000 election, even most non voters in *florida* stated they *still* would not vote, had they known it would be so close. That pretty well captures the extreme disenchantment with politics today

  3. #73
    Why so un**great?
    DifferentDrummr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Facepalm Beach
    Last Seen
    06-04-17 @ 04:57 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    5,818
    Blog Entries
    3

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by eohrnberger View Post
    Exactly. Seems that the more informed Democrat voter just stayed home this last time around.
    If you say so, Mr. Nonpartisan.
    I fight against the ignorant, irresponsible, and/or closed-minded.
    This group is the worst enemy of America and its freedoms. It includes, but is not limited to, all Trump supporters.

  4. #74
    User
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Progressive
    Posts
    9

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    A study by Princeton and Northwestern universities (http://www.princeton.edu/~mgilens/Gi...s%203-7-14.pdf) has shown that the United States operates much more like an oligarchy than the democratic republic it claims to be. An oligarchy is a form of government where the power is held by a select few who, as history has shown us, often protect the interests of those select few. In short, the masses do not have power. An oligarchy is not democratic, and it’s not usually representative of the masses. Right now, that’s our reality. It’s our reality because we allow it to be our reality.

    Only 33.9 percent of registered voters (Actual election turnout far lower than reported | Al Jazeera America) turned out to vote during the midterm elections this year. That percentage doesn’t even take into account the 70 million eligible voters who aren’t registered at all. Only 76.9 million voters went to the polls out of over 227.2 million who were eligible to have done so. Considering how many people voted, having 70 million people not even registered is a disaster in a representative democracy.

    Now, I won’t wax poetic about the billions of people who dream about having the opportunity to vote in a democracy or the hundreds of thousands who have given their life in hope of securing that very right. I’m only talking about Americans for now, but I haven’t forgotten those countless others.

    One of the basic tenets of a democracy is that it is based off the voice of the people. But if the people don’t speak up, we might as well retire that whole “Democratic Republic” part of our country’s name because it’s currently inaccurate. Again, it’s only that way because the non-voters allow it to be.

    I’ve seen dozens of posts across social media from non-voters bragging about not voting, punctuating their declarations of non-participation with a fat “LOL.”

    These non-voters have a healthy list of reasons why they choose to sit out of politics.

    One commonly cited reason is that individual votes don’t count. It is certainly true that very few elections are decided by a single vote margin. But this “my vote doesn’t count” nonsense leaves out two very important things. First, there are 150 million non-voters, many of whom claim that their vote doesn’t count. That’s more than twice the amount of votes cast this season! If all 150 million of the “my vote doesn’t count” non-voters decided to vote, then those votes would most certainly count. Why? Because of the second reason: the politics of the voters and the politics of the non-voters are very different (Nonvoters: Who They Are, What They Think | Pew Research Center for the People and the Press). A Pew Research study found that during the 2012 presidential election, 64 percent of non-voters had a favorable view of Barak Obama while only 32 percent of non-voters had a favorable view of Mitt Romney. Those percentages are very different from the percentages who voted for each candidate.

    Another commonly cited reason for being a non-voter is that both the Democratic Party and the Republican party are pretty terrible right now. HuffPost Pollster says that 42.2 percent of Americans view the Democratic Party favorably (Democratic Party Favorable Rating - Polls - HuffPost Pollster) while only 36.2 percent of Americans view the Republican Party favorably (Republican Party Favorable Rating - Polls - HuffPost Pollster). There were an unfortunate number of candidates at every level of government who ran unopposed and even more districts without third-party candidates (https://gist.github.com/alecperkins/...f3abb1ae232e4f), but there were still hundreds of third-party candidates on the ballots across the country. Third-party candidates often build their platforms specifically to address issues that neither the Democratic nor the Republican candidates are pushing for. Not many third-party candidates manage to get elected, but if those 150 million non-voters were to rally behind those third-party candidates, they’d surely win.

    It’s important to note that election day isn’t just about passing power between different elected officials; important propositions are on the ballots too. The election results on these propositions are often legally binding, meaning if the vote passes, the proposition becomes law. These propositions cover a wide range of subjects that impact the daily lives of the citizens of this country. Propositions on the ballots this time around included the subjects fetal personhood, marijuana decriminalization, reducing prison overcrowding, overhauling political redistricting, increasing minimum wage, and increasing gun control. Non-voters are willingly leaving themselves out of the conversation about these topics by refraining from voting.

    The last reason for not voting that I’ve heard too many non-voters give is also the most worrying reason: they’re not informed enough to participate. Many non-voters know that they know very little about the people and issues on the ballot, but they choose to do nothing about it. Some are even proud of their lack of knowledge! As if willingly keeping one’s self uninformed is a new form of protest.

    Some would argue that it’s better that uninformed voters stay home, but instead of saying, “If you don’t know, don’t vote,” I’d rather say, “If you don’t know, do some reading.” I am very wary about anyone actively discouraging voting because that goes against the very nature of a democracy. Creating abstract prerequisites for voters, like “minimum political knowledge” requirements, is a very dangerous slippery slope. If we want to have a democracy, we need to accept that its weaknesses are still stronger than the weaknesses of other forms of government, and that means we need to accept that all eligible voters should be able to vote and all eligible voters should feel like they’re worthy of the right to vote.

  5. #75
    Guru

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Last Seen
    07-04-15 @ 04:17 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    3,032

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    Chantal, that's a great post. Great writeup of why non-voters SHOULD become informed and vote. I hope people read it.

    Re their "vote not counting" argument - we had a local race; in the primary, if the winner had gotten 3 more votes, he would have avoided a runoff in Nov. THREE more votes. Instead, he and the runner up "got" to campaign all over again for Nov., costing them time and money. He did win in November; and personally, I think that was an opportunity for the voters to examine the candidates in more depth than they did in the primary, so it's not a bad thing; but he was really grappling with the whole "not voting" thing.... in his case, those votes would certainly have counted!

    In my case, I think "if everyone who thinks like me goes to the polls - we'll make a difference. But if I stay home, maybe they will stay home, and then our positions won't be represented in the vote".

  6. #76
    Sage
    KevinKohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    CT
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 09:53 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    15,971
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    It's not a bad thing that fewer people vote now, but the CAUSE for that IS a bad thing.



    You want to fix it? Have a vote of no confidence be an option on every ballot, in every county, in every state.
    Quote Originally Posted by calamity View Post
    Reports indicate that everyone knew he was hauling a bunch of guns up there. But, since you brought it up, there's something which should be illegal: guns that breakdown.

  7. #77
    Guru

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Last Seen
    07-04-15 @ 04:17 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    3,032

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    Good article on why turnout is high in Oregon.
    Why Voter Turnout In Oregon Is Incredibly High


    Partly historic, and partly due to them making it easy to vote.

  8. #78
    Phonetic Mnemonic ©
    radcen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Look to your right... I'm that guy.
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:54 AM
    Lean
    Centrist
    Posts
    33,399

    Re: Is not voting... aka "low voter turnout"... a bad thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chantal View Post
    A study by Princeton and Northwestern universities (Cambridge Journals Online - Perspectives on Politics - Abstract - Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens) has shown that the United States operates much more like an oligarchy than the democratic republic it claims to be. An oligarchy is a form of government where the power is held by a select few who, as history has shown us, often protect the interests of those select few. In short, the masses do not have power. An oligarchy is not democratic, and it’s not usually representative of the masses. Right now, that’s our reality. It’s our reality because we allow it to be our reality.

    <snipped for brevity>
    Good post, and I especially agree with your last sentence as quoted here. I believe that the masses DO have the power... or the potential for power... but for whatever reason choose to surrender it.
    If you claim sexual harassment to be wrong, yet you defend anyone on your side for any reason,
    then you are a hypocrite and everything you say on the matter is just babble.

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •