View Poll Results: I vote

Voters
30. You may not vote on this poll
  • on everything and will continue to do so

    9 30.00%
  • on everything but will not going forward

    1 3.33%
  • only when informed

    18 60.00%
  • I don't vote

    2 6.67%
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Thread: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

  1. #1
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    Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    I've always believed that you should always vote and when confronted by names that I don't recognize on the ballot, I usually pick a mix of democrats and republicans. I figure if I pick of 2 democrats and 2 republicans out of 9 family court judge candidates they balance each other out.

    I read a fairly convincing piece this morning in the Washington Post that makes the claim that you actually have an obligation to
    not vote if ignorant of the issues/candidates. The piece says in part:

    Even if you are an unusually well-informed voter, the enormous size, scope, and complexity of modern government ensure that there will be many issues and candidates about which you know very little….

    It’s unrealistic to expect that everyone will achieve a high level of knowledge about every race and every initiative. But if you find that you know little or nothing about a particular race or ballot question, you might want to consider simply not voting on it. As political philosopher Jason Brennan argues, voters have a moral duty to be at least reasonably well-informed about the issues they vote on, because the decisions they make affect not just themselves but all of society. John Stuart Mill put it well when he wrote that voting is not just an exercise of personal choice, but rather “the exercise of power over others.” If you can’t exercise that power in at least a minimally responsible manner, maybe you should not do so at all.


    (Link to full article: On election day, consider abstaining from ignorant voting - The Washington Post )

    So do you vote even if you're not informed?
    Don't be a grammar nazi - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, Book 1 #7

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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius46 View Post
    So do you vote even if you're not informed?
    I did this in 1992 and I will never do it again. I felt really bad that I had not kept up with anything and voted even though I didn't know the issues.

    I think it is very important to know the issues and at least have a pro and con for each choice to be able to weigh with.

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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius46 View Post
    So do you vote even if you're not informed?
    I've never gone in to voting booth without some decent idea about the people I would be voting for.

    I don't like the idea of suggesting anyone chooses not to vote but I can see where it could be the least worst option. I agree that there is a responsibility to know who/what you're voting for and "ignorant voting" can be damaging. I think we also have a responsibility to be involved in the political process though and I don't see why the average person shouldn't be able to gain that basic knowledge, though I think there are things which can be done to help.

    For example, in a number of the local elections here, we get an independently produced booklet in the post which has a page for each candidate standing to introduce themselves and lay out their policies. There is a lot of the usual political spin of course but it at least means everyone should know who all the candidates are (which can also help provide balance for the independents and minor parties who get little or no media attention).

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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius46 View Post
    I've always believed that you should always vote and when confronted by names that I don't recognize on the ballot, I usually pick a mix of democrats and republicans. I figure if I pick of 2 democrats and 2 republicans out of 9 family court judge candidates they balance each other out.

    I read a fairly convincing piece this morning in the Washington Post that makes the claim that you actually have an obligation to
    not vote if ignorant of the issues/candidates. The piece says in part:

    Even if you are an unusually well-informed voter, the enormous size, scope, and complexity of modern government ensure that there will be many issues and candidates about which you know very little….

    It’s unrealistic to expect that everyone will achieve a high level of knowledge about every race and every initiative. But if you find that you know little or nothing about a particular race or ballot question, you might want to consider simply not voting on it. As political philosopher Jason Brennan argues, voters have a moral duty to be at least reasonably well-informed about the issues they vote on, because the decisions they make affect not just themselves but all of society. John Stuart Mill put it well when he wrote that voting is not just an exercise of personal choice, but rather “the exercise of power over others.” If you can’t exercise that power in at least a minimally responsible manner, maybe you should not do so at all.


    (Link to full article: On election day, consider abstaining from ignorant voting - The Washington Post )

    So do you vote even if you're not informed?
    I don't vote on issues I'm unable to inform myself about. Usually this means I don't vote on a few local issues, since it's the most difficult to find information on those.
    If you build a man a fire, he'll be warm for a day.

    If you set a man on fire, he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius46 View Post
    I've always believed that you should always vote and when confronted by names that I don't recognize on the ballot, I usually pick a mix of democrats and republicans. I figure if I pick of 2 democrats and 2 republicans out of 9 family court judge candidates they balance each other out.

    I read a fairly convincing piece this morning in the Washington Post that makes the claim that you actually have an obligation to
    not vote if ignorant of the issues/candidates. The piece says in part:

    Even if you are an unusually well-informed voter, the enormous size, scope, and complexity of modern government ensure that there will be many issues and candidates about which you know very little….

    It’s unrealistic to expect that everyone will achieve a high level of knowledge about every race and every initiative. But if you find that you know little or nothing about a particular race or ballot question, you might want to consider simply not voting on it. As political philosopher Jason Brennan argues, voters have a moral duty to be at least reasonably well-informed about the issues they vote on, because the decisions they make affect not just themselves but all of society. John Stuart Mill put it well when he wrote that voting is not just an exercise of personal choice, but rather “the exercise of power over others.” If you can’t exercise that power in at least a minimally responsible manner, maybe you should not do so at all.


    (Link to full article: On election day, consider abstaining from ignorant voting - The Washington Post )

    So do you vote even if you're not informed?


    I do the best that I can and I vote in every election.

    If nobody voted except those who have the time to be very well informed on every issue and candidate, who would be running the USA?

  6. #6
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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    I have no problem leaving portions of the ballot blank (and have often done so). I have no idea who would make the best State Agricultural Commissioner, for example.

  7. #7
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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by shrubnose View Post
    I do the best that I can and I vote in every election.

    If nobody voted except those who have the time to be very well informed on every issue and candidate, who would be running the USA?
    I think the point the author was making wasn't to abstain from voting completely but rather to abstain from casting a ballot only on those issues/races that you're not informed on. In my case I know nothing about our family court judge candidates other than perhaps meeting one at the commuter rail station or a supermarket around election day. What basis do I really have to make an informed choice. Their party affiliation isn't nearly enough. So perhaps I should not cast a ballot in that race but still vote in the gubernatorial and assembly races since I am informed on those.

    In a perfect world that would leave only people who actually are informed to vote in a given race and presumably they'd be making a more rational decision than you could.
    Don't be a grammar nazi - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, Book 1 #7

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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius46 View Post
    I've always believed that you should always vote and when confronted by names that I don't recognize on the ballot, I usually pick a mix of democrats and republicans. I figure if I pick of 2 democrats and 2 republicans out of 9 family court judge candidates they balance each other out.

    I read a fairly convincing piece this morning in the Washington Post that makes the claim that you actually have an obligation to
    not vote if ignorant of the issues/candidates. The piece says in part:

    Even if you are an unusually well-informed voter, the enormous size, scope, and complexity of modern government ensure that there will be many issues and candidates about which you know very little….

    It’s unrealistic to expect that everyone will achieve a high level of knowledge about every race and every initiative. But if you find that you know little or nothing about a particular race or ballot question, you might want to consider simply not voting on it. As political philosopher Jason Brennan argues, voters have a moral duty to be at least reasonably well-informed about the issues they vote on, because the decisions they make affect not just themselves but all of society. John Stuart Mill put it well when he wrote that voting is not just an exercise of personal choice, but rather “the exercise of power over others.” If you can’t exercise that power in at least a minimally responsible manner, maybe you should not do so at all.


    (Link to full article: On election day, consider abstaining from ignorant voting - The Washington Post )

    So do you vote even if you're not informed?
    People who don't learn always have stumped me.

    Is it really that hard to research before going to vote?

    Most states /counties these days have websites that cover who is running and so forth. People know way ahead of time who will be on the ballot. There's no excuse, in my opinion, for being uniformed and still deciding to go to the voting booth. Might as well not vote - not like someone who doesn't do research actually gives a **** about who runs and what they're doing in office. "Oh . . . gee. . . is Obama President? I wish I could remember if I voted for him or not." []
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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    I recently moved to another state and did not inform myself of the local races or state races prior to yesterday. Honestly I have been too busy getting settled in. I did not vote yesterday because of this. I didn't feel it was right to do so being uninformed of the candidates. It is the first time I have not voted in election in I don't know how long. Too each their own but it's how I feel.

  10. #10
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    Re: Should you cast a vote even if you're not informed on the candidates/issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Spiker View Post
    People who don't learn always have stumped me.

    Is it really that hard to research before going to vote?

    Most states /counties these days have websites that cover who is running and so forth. People know way ahead of time who will be on the ballot. There's no excuse, in my opinion, for being uniformed and still deciding to go to the voting booth. Might as well not vote - not like someone who doesn't do research actually gives a **** about who runs and what they're doing in office.
    "Oh . . . gee. . . is Obama President? I wish I could remember if I voted for him or not."
    []


    Half of the voters are dumber than the other half.

    Who put all of those people in Washington who can't pour urine out of a boot with the instructions on the sole?

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