View Poll Results: Who much should we spend to the millitary budget? In billion dollars

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  • Less than 100

    10 20.83%
  • 100-200

    3 6.25%
  • 200-300

    3 6.25%
  • 300-400

    7 14.58%
  • 400-500

    4 8.33%
  • 500-600

    3 6.25%
  • 600-700

    1 2.08%
  • 700-800

    10 20.83%
  • 800-900

    2 4.17%
  • More than 900

    5 10.42%
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Thread: The military budget of the United States

  1. #31
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by eohrnberger View Post
    Russia? The their weak economy? I'm far more worried about China and their booming economy, considering the militarily aggressive moves they've exhibited in the last year or so. Aren't China and Japan still 'arguing' over some island or another?
    Greetings, Erik.

    Russia doesn't have a weak economy from what I've been reading. They have more oil than the Saudis, and they have been flexing their muscles on the world stage with good effect. They appear to have both the Ukraine and the EU apprehensive, for lack of a better word, about their agenda. They are partnering with China in many areas, which is apparent. Putin wants Russia to be a world leader again, and he's working toward that goal, IMO.

    Granted, the average Russian citizen may not be doing all that much better, but the government sure has lots of money for the things they want to do. Sound familiar? Russian government is backed by very wealthy enthusiastic supporters who do not wish to be ruled by Western powers, via a US-dominated global financial system. Hence the current determination by both Russia and China to do away with our "favored nation status" that forces the world to use our petro-dollar worldwide in trade. They want a basket of currencies used for international commerce instead of just the dollar. If they succeed, and they are inking agreements with many countries that we do business with..., we certainly won't be better off!

  2. #32
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by polgara View Post
    Greetings, Erik.

    Russia doesn't have a weak economy from what I've been reading. They have more oil than the Saudis, and they have been flexing their muscles on the world stage with good effect. They appear to have both the Ukraine and the EU apprehensive, for lack of a better word, about their agenda. They are partnering with China in many areas, which is apparent. Putin wants Russia to be a world leader again, and he's working toward that goal, IMO.

    Granted, the average Russian citizen may not be doing all that much better, but the government sure has lots of money for the things they want to do. Sound familiar? Russian government is backed by very wealthy enthusiastic supporters who do not wish to be ruled by Western powers, via a US-dominated global financial system. Hence the current determination by both Russia and China to do away with our "favored nation status" that forces the world to use our petro-dollar worldwide in trade. They want a basket of currencies used for international commerce instead of just the dollar. If they succeed, and they are inking agreements with many countries that we do business with..., we certainly won't be better off!
    Greeting and palpitations Polgara!

    I recall back when Russia first moved on the Crimea and Ukraine. Some were saying that should the EU stop buying their LNG, that their economic hardship would be almost immediate, and they'd not be able to continue for very long. We the Crimea and Ukraine situation hasn't changed and it's been some months now.

    Might it be the punditry were wrong then? From your description, it sounds as if Russia is on pretty solid economic footing for this, which, I have to admit, makes sense, as Russians do tend to be long in the planning. So much for the punditry being a blind squirrel on this occasion.
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  3. #33
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by eohrnberger View Post
    Greeting and palpitations Polgara!

    I recall back when Russia first moved on the Crimea and Ukraine. Some were saying that should the EU stop buying their LNG, that their economic hardship would be almost immediate, and they'd not be able to continue for very long. We the Crimea and Ukraine situation hasn't changed and it's been some months now.

    Might it be the punditry were wrong then? From your description, it sounds as if Russia is on pretty solid economic footing for this, which, I have to admit, makes sense, as Russians do tend to be long in the planning. So much for the punditry being a blind squirrel on this occasion.
    IMO, if the EU and the Ukraine don't cause "behavior" problems for Russia, they'll get along fine. I can't shake the feeling that Putin has bigger fish to fry than that, though. You don't see China or Russia involving themselves in the ME, except to provide arms to the whoever is willing to buy them, which is a strictly financial thing. They aren't sending planes or ships or drones or personnel that I know of, but their people aren't getting beheaded either. The ME has been fighting each other over a religious war for over 1,350 years, and it's almost seems as if Russia and China have adopted an attitude of "carry on because we just don't much care one way or another." Russia may have learned that lesson in Afghanistan, which nearly bankrupted them before they finally withdrew in defeat. Nothing has changed in the ME except to get worse, so do they expect and hope that the same thing happens to us? Wouldn't surprise me!.

  4. #34
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by polgara View Post
    IMO, if the EU and the Ukraine don't cause "behavior" problems for Russia, they'll get along fine. I can't shake the feeling that Putin has bigger fish to fry than that, though. You don't see China or Russia involving themselves in the ME, except to provide arms to the whoever is willing to buy them, which is a strictly financial thing. They aren't sending planes or ships or drones or personnel that I know of, but their people aren't getting beheaded either. The ME has been fighting each other over a religious war for over 1,350 years, and it's almost seems as if Russia and China have adopted an attitude of "carry on because we just don't much care one way or another." Russia may have learned that lesson in Afghanistan, which nearly bankrupted them before they finally withdrew in defeat. Nothing has changed in the ME except to get worse, so do they expect and hope that the same thing happens to us? Wouldn't surprise me!.
    The super powers take turns beating themselves senseless and to a pulp against the same rock? I guess stranger things have been known to happen.
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  5. #35
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by shrubnose View Post
    And more of it is being wasted funding the USA's military/industrialcomplex which President Eisenhower warned us about in a famous speech.

    The USA spends more on preparations for war than all of its enemies combined. A lot of that money is wasted and could be better spent on other things.
    Or better yet just not spent. Or taxed.
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  6. #36
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Spend as much as we need in order to maintain the greatest military on earth.

    I was born in Sweden and immigrated to the US as a kid. Sweden recently had an episode where a Russian submarine was literally off the coast of Stockholm (the capital) making distress calls. Sweden scrambled their navy together to try to locate the submarine, but couldn't do it. The Russian sub got within yards of the Swedish capital uncontested, and got away scott free.

    This past Easter, Russia illegally conducted military exercises over Swedish soil, simulating an attack on the Swedish island of Gotland. Sweden could not scramble an aircraft together fast enough to go up and meet the Russian plane, a national embarrasment. NATO, on the other hand, did scramble a plane and chased the Russian plane away. (Sweden is not a NATO member).

    No, Sweden do a lot of things right, but as far as self defense goes, they lag way behind. One of the best things about living in the USA is the peace of mind that comes from knowing that we could kick anyone in the world's butts if push came to shove. Russia would never in a million years dream of screwing with the Americans the way they screwed with the Swedes. And I like it that way.

    Spend as much as you need. Cut costs elsewhere.

  7. #37
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by Capster78 View Post
    This comes from complete ignorance. War is not just a battle fought on the battlefield. War is economic, technologic and geopolitic. Without the joint security treaties we have in Asia, that part of the country will soon make the middle east look like a playground. There are still deep seated mistrusts in Asia between Japan, China, and Korea(s). Each of those countries also have deep seated mistrusts with outside countries they boarder as well as strong alliances. All of whom are waiting for chinks in each others armor to exploit. Basically, there are several potential hot spots that exist there. Many of which are avoided by our joint security treaties. Without US presence in Japan and Korea, there would no longer be a referee to any small squabbles that arise. The trust those nations have in each other manifests itself thru the US as an intermediary a lot of times. I believe our post WW2 strategy will be looked back on by historians as one of the greatest contributions the US has ever made to the world. We have been directly responsible for the peace that has ushered in prosperity for almost all of the 1st world countries. The reason people make the argument you do, is because they have never lived in a world post WW2 when the US was not intensely involved in international politics.
    That is what internationalist/globalist, neocon and other pieces of **** want people to believe.That somehow if we are not sticking our noses into everyone else's business that the world will go to hell in a hand-basket and that will eventually effect us.

    Our defense should only be focused on defending our country from inside the US, not other countries, here.Our troops should be here in the US defending our borders and waters, not inside other countries.If another country attacks our country.Then our policy should be to bomb the living **** out of it and cripple it.No more this nonsense of rebuilding or trying to stabilize countries that attack us.
    Last edited by jamesrage; 10-27-14 at 09:14 AM.
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  8. #38
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    I believe in deep military cuts. There is no reason the US should spend more money on its military than the next 10 countries with the largest military budget combined. The US is still spending at cold war levels long after the cold war has ended.

    Having said that, we have to keep in mind that the USDOD is the largest employer in the world even before you start counting all of the military contractors and the indirect jobs they create. Deep cuts done without the proper preparation would be disastrous for the US economy. Cuts to the military have to be matched with increases to other branches of the government that can create jobs. I'm not sure what those branches would be, space exploration is a clear candidate, as is NOAA, but those departments can't absorb the amount of money we are talking about here.

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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    America, imo, should pull all her troops home immediately, close all foreign military bases and turn from a huge, massively expensive, peace time armed forces to a tiny regular armed forces with a huge militia (reserves).

    As for the other countries, let them look after themselves for once.

  10. #40
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    Re: The military budget of the United States

    Quote Originally Posted by DA60 View Post
    America, imo, should pull all her troops home immediately, close all foreign military bases and turn from a huge, massively expensive, peace time armed forces to a tiny regular armed forces with a huge militia (reserves).

    As for the other countries, let them look after themselves for once.
    I don't think isolation is possible in 21st century international politics.
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