View Poll Results: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

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Thread: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

  1. #31
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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Yes, give them voting rights. We as humans are very fortunate to be at the top of the food chain. We make many more mistakes in life than any other creatures. With as many mistakes as we make we would have been eaten a long time. I am a very firm believer in second and sometimes third chances.

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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by ocean515 View Post
    I guess if one is hobbled my massive projection, that could be true. While it may be true some crimes classified as felonies should be looked at, at the end of the day, a person makes a conscious decision to commit a crime. Complaining later that they don't like the repercussions proves they still don't get it. My conclusion?
    I used to think the way you do. But I realized that if you actually care about the bill of rights then you would not support stripping the rights of any American who is not incarcerated.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

  3. #33
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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    I used to think the way you do. But I realized that if you actually care about the bill of rights then you would not support stripping the rights of any American who is not incarcerated.
    Well, I suppose if you're running with the projection bit, it follows you would assume something about my feelings towards the Bill of Rights. Laws carry responsibilities. It's undeniable a decision has been made when one commits a felony. Suffering the repercussions from those decisions is the way it goes.

    Deciding later it isn't fair that some Constitutional privileges have been sacrificed is just the noise from someone who hasn't accepted that they are the ones to blame for their situation, and not the law.

    Bleeding hearts need to take a hike on this one. Enough with the stripping of responsibility for ones life decisions. We have created enough harm to society by allowing that mentality to carry any weight.

  4. #34
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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigfoot 88 View Post
    All felons should have their rights returned if it is deemed they should return to society.

    Punishing people beyond their sentence is stupid and only increases the likelihood they return to crime. The goal should be to reintegrate people back into society.
    I'm sure those on a sex offender registry would agree with you. Except the likelihood to return to crime is the reason for the registry.
    People in Dubai don't like the Flintstones but people in Abu Dhabi do

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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by ocean515 View Post
    I guess if one is hobbled my massive projection, that could be true. While it may be true some crimes classified as felonies should be looked at, at the end of the day, a person makes a conscious decision to commit a crime. Complaining later that they don't like the repercussions proves they still don't get it. My conclusion?
    Not necessarily. This book tackles this subject and does a good job of exposing this commonly held, and incorrect, belief...

    http://www.amazon.com/Three-Felonies.../dp/1594035229

    From the above link:
    The average professional in this country wakes up in the morning, goes to work, comes home, eats dinner, and then goes to sleep, unaware that he or she has likely committed several federal crimes that day. Why? The answer lies in the very nature of modern federal criminal laws, which have exploded in number but also become impossibly broad and vague. In Three Felonies a Day, Harvey A. Silverglate reveals how federal criminal laws have become dangerously disconnected from the English common law tradition and how prosecutors can pin arguable federal crimes on any one of us, for even the most seemingly innocuous behavior. The volume of federal crimes in recent decades has increased well beyond the statute books and into the morass of the Code of Federal Regulations, handing federal prosecutors an additional trove of vague and exceedingly complex and technical prohibitions to stick on their hapless targets. The dangers spelled out in Three Felonies a Day do not apply solely to “white collar criminals,” state and local politicians, and professionals. No social class or profession is safe from this troubling form of social control by the executive branch, and nothing less than the integrity of our constitutional democracy hangs in the balance.
    Emphasis in bold mine.
    Last edited by radcen; 10-18-14 at 11:39 AM.
    If you claim sexual harassment to be wrong, yet you defend anyone on your side for any reason,
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  6. #36
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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    I used to think the way you do. But I realized that if you actually care about the bill of rights then you would not support stripping the rights of any American who is not incarcerated.
    Bingo. Supporting the Bill of Rights means sucking it up and not letting the emotions of revenge and retribution cloud your conclusions.
    If you claim sexual harassment to be wrong, yet you defend anyone on your side for any reason,
    then you are a hypocrite and everything you say on the matter is just babble.

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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    Not necessarily. This book tackles this subject and does a good job of exposing this commonly held, and incorrect, belief...

    Three Felonies A Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent: Harvey Silverglate, Alan M. Dershowitz: 9781594035227: Amazon.com: Books


    Emphasis in bold mine.
    I guess there are more people who want to join the projection parade. Yes, there are so many laws on the books it's impossible, even for law enforcement, to be fully aware of them. I think we have to push the envelope way outside the building and down the street to attach breaking obscure laws to felonies that result in a debt owed to the public that includes the loss of some Constitutional rights.

    I don't subscribe to the thinking that once a convicted felon has served time in jail, paid fines, completed probations, etc., their debt to society has been paid. That's a false claim. That debt includes the loss of some rights. What proponents of a return of these rights are suggesting is that the debt be cut short, and be left with a balance due. This debt to society is part of the line a convicted felon crossed. Crying about it after the fact is like signing in the shower. Who cares.

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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheDemSocialist View Post
    Simple question: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?
    I think all prisoners who are released should get their voting rights back.

  9. #39
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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    depending on the crime, i'd say their records should be expunged after a certain amount of time so that they can be eligible for good jobs. people with decent jobs are a lot less likely to reenter the system.

  10. #40
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    Re: Should Nonviolent drug offenders get their voting rights back?

    Quote Originally Posted by ocean515 View Post
    Well, I suppose if you're running with the projection bit, it follows you would assume something about my feelings towards the Bill of Rights. Laws carry responsibilities. It's undeniable a decision has been made when one commits a felony. Suffering the repercussions from those decisions is the way it goes.

    Deciding later it isn't fair that some Constitutional privileges have been sacrificed is just the noise from someone who hasn't accepted that they are the ones to blame for their situation, and not the law.

    Bleeding hearts need to take a hike on this one. Enough with the stripping of responsibility for ones life decisions. We have created enough harm to society by allowing that mentality to carry any weight.
    It isn't a issue about being a bleeding heart.It is about actually adhering to the constitution. If a individual can not be trusted with his or her constitutional rights then that person should not be released from prison until such a time occurs. Because someone bent on doing evil will find a way of committing evil.I realize that to you the constitution is a "living" document but if you want these exceptions then you must go through the amendment process.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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