View Poll Results: Economic Disparity = Education Inequality?

Voters
48. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    40 83.33%
  • No

    8 16.67%
Page 13 of 15 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 150

Thread: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

  1. #121
    Guru

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Seen
    Today @ 08:40 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    4,941

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by roguenuke View Post
    Grants rarely cover college costs completely, even for community college.
    Then get a part time job like I did while I was going to school. Or you can do a few years in the military and get out with some additional skills and the GI Bill. Hell they might just enjoy it and stay in as I did. Now I make a very good living and get all the being it's as pass the GI bill to my son so he can go to school. There are many many ways to get ahead in the US if you make good choices and work hard. Always making excuses for other people does not do anyone any good.

  2. #122
    Outer space potato man

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Seen
    Today @ 11:55 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    51,821

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bodhisattva View Post
    It is pretty simple. High income families generally are already more educated families and recognize the benefit to a good education. They also then pursue that better education. They also generally will be more intelligent and that is the very reason that they are more educated families pursuing higher education and better paying jobs. It is cyclical. A smart educated man generally marries a smart educated woman. They have children that are generally smart and eventually well educated. Round and round we go and the same exact thing is OPPOSITE for poor families. Reverse it all. Not as educated. Not as able to recognize the value of a good education. Get poorer paying jobs. Not as smart or educated man marries and conceives with not as smart or educated woman. Cyclical. I see it every year in the education profession.
    You really think the reason someone below the poverty line doesn't attend Harvard is that they don't see the value of attending Harvard?
    He touched her over her bra and underpants, she says, and guided her hand to touch him over his underwear
    Quote Originally Posted by Lutherf View Post
    We’ll say what? Something like “nothing happened” ... Yeah, we might say something like that.

  3. #123
    Educator
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Conservative
    Posts
    728

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by roguenuke View Post
    And having loans still puts people behind. If I go to school on loans while someone else goes to school completely paid for by their parent, and we get jobs that pay the same amount when we get out, that puts me still behind because I owe money and they don't. That is the point. In reality, that is a huge disparity.
    So? Who said you should have what someone else has?

    Why should it be any concern to me if a coworker of mine had his school paid for by their parents?

  4. #124
    Sage

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:01 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Centrist
    Posts
    8,180

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    You really think the reason someone below the poverty line doesn't attend Harvard is that they don't see the value of attending Harvard?
    The reason they typically don't attend Harvard is that they're not exceptional academic performers and/or they're not rich and powerful.

    And the intergenerationally poor often can't even see the value in attempting to succeed in high school.

  5. #125
    Sage
    Bodhisattva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Last Seen
    Today @ 04:40 AM
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    63,959

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce View Post
    You really think the reason someone below the poverty line doesn't attend Harvard is that they don't see the value of attending Harvard?
    In most cases I don't think that they are thinking about a university at all, much less Harvard.

    I teach. I have taught thousands and a minority fraction of those that were poor even attempted to go to university. Most simply scoffed at the entire idea of university as a stupid idea.

    Just facts that I don't think the vast majority of those arguing against me even have a clue about.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have pooped in public, even in public neighborhoods.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatGuy View Post
    Usually a gag for wise mouthed insulting little girls. Then some good nylon rope so I can tie them up, toss them in the trunk of my car and forget about them.

  6. #126
    Sage
    Bodhisattva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Last Seen
    Today @ 04:40 AM
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    63,959

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neomalthusian View Post
    And the intergenerationally poor often can't even see the value in attempting to succeed in high school.
    Perfectly said. They are not doing class work much less home work and study at the library? Forget it.

    Like you said they will only finish high school because they are led by the hand by teachers. If not for the teachers and the low standards to pass high school these kids wouldn't even get a diploma. University? Forget about it...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have pooped in public, even in public neighborhoods.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatGuy View Post
    Usually a gag for wise mouthed insulting little girls. Then some good nylon rope so I can tie them up, toss them in the trunk of my car and forget about them.

  7. #127
    Politically Correct

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Seen
    12-13-17 @ 08:33 PM
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    2,850
    Blog Entries
    8

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Of course kids from rich families are more likely to succeed. The rich kids get sent off to private schools showered with private funding where they can interact and become friends with the children of other people in positions of power and participate in a variety of enticing extracurriculars while the poor kids attend underfunded, overcrowded public schools where they have no real role models and have to work professionally unimpressive part-time jobs to support themselves and their families.

    Or, instead of segregating themselves educationally, the rich segregate themselves geographically and you get 99% white public schools funded about as well as private schools, but still have virtually zero social integration. Like the public school I was lucky enough to go to due to my parents' success.

    Educational inequality is much much much worse than wealth inequality, because it creates social immobility. To have true social mobility, all kids needs to have access to the same quality of basic education in their formative years, regardless of their parents' assets or what neighborhoods they live in. And poor and rich kids need to interact with one another. This would also help the social/political division between the rich and poor - if people of different income classes actually interacted with each other ever.
    (avatar by Thomas Nast)

  8. #128
    Sewer Rat
    Risky Thicket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Last Seen
    Today @ 12:55 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    23,803

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kreton View Post
    I disagree on a lot of this.

    1. Money does not dictate how a family may feel about the value of education. There are countless people living in poverty who understand the value of education and want nothing more than to be able to provide that education for their children and themselves. They may not have the money to ensure their kids can get the education needed to succeed, that doesn't mean they don't understand the value.

    2. Money does not equal intelligence. And lack of money does not equal lack of intelligence.

    Quite simply money = opportunity. Not just in education but in influence, opportunity, and chances.
    No argument on that from me. At the same time I have defined "success" differently at various stages of life. While I very much value education for many reasons, I do believe that it is often a mistake to pursue an education for the purpose of being financially successful and assuming that great financial success will be the foundation of great happiness. Some people learn early on what will make them happiest in life and they pursue it with great passion. I define doing and being what truly makes you happy as succeeding in life.










    "When Faith preaches Hate, Blessed are the Doubters." - Amin Maalouf

    When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often, that person is crazy. ~Dave Barry



  9. #129
    Sage
    chromium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    A2
    Last Seen
    06-05-17 @ 10:53 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    16,968

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Oh, it's a huge advantage no doubt. Since you mention college, the difference is usually not taking out tens of thousands in debt, a free car, study abroad, internships in south africa or summer classes without having to work, dropping 'hard' classes with no fear of losing financial aid, eating out anytime one feels like it, and hell, my first roommate decided dorms were too ghetto, so his parents quickly got him a hotel to stay at. Mentioning that i always had to share a small room with a sibling had no impact on his entitlement syndrome.

    Being from a poor background means listening to crybaby 'adults' whine that they had to settle for 1st class seats instead of their parent's private jet, while you had to save up from a minimum wage summer job to drive a beat up rental car. It's where i learned there is no end to the bull**** spoiled brats will expect handed to them.

    But how the hell is someone supposed to get into an elite college, coming from a school system that doesn't offer a single class foreign language, calculus, chemistry, business? Or a ghetto in detroit with 50 kids per teacher?

    But of course, the pampering begins much earlier. Just about any obstacle that a rich kid faces growing up can be overcome simply by their parents buying their way out of it.

  10. #130
    Sage
    chromium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    A2
    Last Seen
    06-05-17 @ 10:53 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    16,968

    Re: Kids from rich families are more likely to succeed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Risky Thicket View Post
    No argument on that from me. At the same time I have defined "success" differently at various stages of life. While I very much value education for many reasons, I do believe that it is often a mistake to pursue an education for the purpose of being financially successful and assuming that great financial success will be the foundation of great happiness. Some people learn early on what will make them happiest in life and they pursue it with great passion. I define doing and being what truly makes you happy as succeeding in life.
    That's very true, but not everyone is going to be content doing factory work in rotating temp jobs, i.e. the kind of career one can expect without an education.

    Also, a primary reason so many kids change majors is they do not discover their passion early on. It's much easier to do so when $ is no obstacle and you can literally travel the world and have access to people/mentors who have found success in a given path, or at the very least, attend some posh K-12 that offers classes in a far wider range of subjects. I knew how utterly inferior my K-12 was at helping me identify a passion, when i realized i had never heard of 80% of my college's majors.

Page 13 of 15 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •