View Poll Results: Who would you place on a dollar?

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  • Susan B. Anthony

    24 18.05%
  • Rosa Parks

    16 12.03%
  • Sally Ride

    0 0%
  • Harriet Tubman

    9 6.77%
  • Amelia Earhart

    31 23.31%
  • Sojourner Truth

    1 0.75%
  • Eleanor Roosevelt

    11 8.27%
  • Molly Pitcher

    0 0%
  • Other

    33 24.81%
  • I do not think a women should be on a dollar

    8 6.02%
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Thread: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

  1. #81
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord of Planar View Post
    Sacagawea
    Too late.

    What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?-2000s_sac_dollar_obv-jpg
    There is nothing demonstrably true that religion can provide the world that cannot be achieved more rationally through entirely secular means.

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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lovebug View Post
    Its a hypothetical.
    I voted 'other'...Mother Theresa
    Why? Beyond being a horrible human being, she wasn't even an American citizen.
    There is nothing demonstrably true that religion can provide the world that cannot be achieved more rationally through entirely secular means.

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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Sojourner Truth is a good choice.
    Also:
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the Seneca Falls Convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized women's rights and women's suffrage movements in the United States.[1][2]

    Before Stanton narrowed her political focus almost exclusively to women's rights, she was an active abolitionist with her husband, Henry Brewster Stanton and cousin, Gerrit Smith. Unlike many of those involved in the women's rights movement, Stanton addressed various issues pertaining to women beyond voting rights. Her concerns included women's parental and custody rights, property rights, employment and income rights, divorce, the economic health of the family, and birth control.[3] She was also an outspoken supporter of the 19th-century temperance movement.

    After the American Civil War, Stanton's commitment to female suffrage caused a schism in the women's rights movement when she, together with Susan B. Anthony, declined to support passage of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. She opposed giving added legal protection and voting rights to African American men while women, black and white, were denied those same rights. Her position on this issue, together with her thoughts on organized Christianity and women's issues beyond voting rights, led to the formation of two separate women's rights organizations that were finally rejoined, with Stanton as president of the joint organization, approximately twenty years after her break from the original women's suffrage movement. Stanton died in 1902 having authored both The Woman's Bible and her autobiography, along with many articles and pamphlets concerning female suffrage and women's rights.

    Believing that men should not be given the right to vote without women also being granted the franchise, Sojourner Truth, a former slave and feminist, affiliated herself with Stanton and Anthony's organization.[6

    In addition to her writing and speaking, Stanton was also instrumental in promoting women's suffrage in various states, particularly New York, Missouri, Kansas, where it was included on the ballot in 1867, and Michigan, where it was put to a vote in 1874. She made an unsuccessful bid for a U.S. Congressional seat from New York in 1868, and she was the primary force behind the passage of the Woman's Property Bill that was eventually passed by the New York State Legislature.[1] She worked toward female suffrage in Wyoming, Utah, and California, and in 1878, she convinced California Senator Aaron A. Sargent to introduce a female suffrage amendment using wording similar to that of the Fifteenth Amendment passed some eight years previously.[77]

    Unlike many of her colleagues, Stanton believed organized Christianity relegated women to an unacceptable position in society. She explored this view in the 1890s in The Woman's Bible, which elucidated a feminist understanding of biblical scripture and sought to correct the fundamental sexism Stanton believed was inherent to organized Christianity.[70] Likewise, Stanton supported divorce rights, employment rights, and property rights for women, issues in which the American Women's Suffrage Association (AWSA) preferred not to become involved.[71]

    Her more radical positions included acceptance of interracial marriage.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    also Victoria Woodhull
    "...Woodhull and her sister Tennessee (Tennie) Claflin became the first women stockbrokers and in 1870 opened a brokerage firm on Wall Street. She made a fortune on the New York Stock Exchange...... Newspapers such as the New York Herald hailed Woodhull and Claflin as "the Queens of Finance" and "the Bewitching Brokers."[citation needed] Many contemporary men's journals (e.g., The Days' Doings) published sexualized images of the pair running their firm (although they did not participate in the day-to-day business of the firm),[14] linking the concept of publicly minded, un-chaperoned women with ideas of "sexual immorality" and prostitution.[citation needed]

    .....Woodhull and Claflin used the money they had made from their brokerage to found a paper, Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly, its primary purpose to support Victoria Claflin Woodhull for President of the United States,[14] and which published for the next six years. Feminism was the Weekly's primary interest,[14] but it became notorious for publishing controversial opinions on taboo topics, advocating among other things sex education, free love, women's suffrage, short skirts, spiritualism, vegetarianism, and licensed prostitution. Histories often state the paper advocated birth control, but some historians disagree....

    .....Woodhull learned how to infiltrate the all-male domain of national politics and arranged to testify on women's suffrage before the House Judiciary Committee.[9] Woodhull argued that women already had the right to vote — all they had to do was use it — since the 14th and 15th Amendments guaranteed the protection of that right for all citizens.[15] The simple but powerful logic of her argument impressed some committee members. Learning of Woodhull's planned address, suffrage leaders postponed the opening of the 1871 National Woman Suffrage Association's third annual convention in Washington in order to attend the committee hearing. Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Isabella Beecher Hooker, saw Woodhull as the newest champion of their cause. They applauded her statement: "[W]omen are the equals of men before the law, and are equal in all their rights....."[15]

    With the power of her first public appearance as a woman's rights advocate, Woodhull moved to the leadership circle of the suffrage movement. Although her Constitutional argument was not original, she focused unprecedented public attention on suffrage. Woodhull was the first woman ever to petition Congress in person....


    ....Woodhull was nominated for President of the United States by the newly formed Equal Rights Party on May 10, 1872, at Apollo Hall, New York City. A year earlier, she had announced her intention to run. ....They nominated the former slave and abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass for Vice President....This made her the first woman candidate...

    Having been vilified in the media for her support of free love, Woodhull devoted an issue of Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly (November 2, 1872) to an alleged adulterous affair between Elizabeth Tilton and Reverend Henry Ward Beecher, a prominent Protestant minister in New York (he supported female suffrage but had lectured against free love in his sermons). Woodhull published the article to highlight what she saw as a sexual double-standard between men and women.

    That same day, a few days before the presidential election, U.S. Federal Marshals arrested Woodhull, her second husband Colonel James Blood, and her sister Tennie C. Claflin on charges of "publishing an obscene newspaper" because of the content of this issue...."
    Victoria Woodhull - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Last edited by Hard Truth; 08-11-14 at 05:07 PM.

  4. #84
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Just make sure not to include Stanton's diatribes against African American males or the undesirable European immigrant....
    Michael J Petrilli-"Is School Choice Enough?"-A response to the recent timidity of American conservatives toward education reform. https://nationalaffairs.com/publicat...-choice-enough

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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fiddytree View Post
    Just make sure not to include Stanton's diatribes against African American males or the undesirable European immigrant....
    And we'll make sure no adulterers or slave owners or those that slept with them make it on there either.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have felt pain when I was in the womb. So when you say they are incapable of feeling pain, that is based on junk science.
    Quote Originally Posted by applejuicefool View Post
    A murderer putting a bullet through someone's brain is a medical procedure too.

  6. #86
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    We already have a Susan B Anthony dollar. I liked it.
    "It is only when men contemplate the greatness of God that they can come to realize their own inadequacy." Jean Calvin

  7. #87
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Condelleza Rice is the obvious choice, if only to take care of the inevitable "black person" on our money debate at the same time.
    "Loyalty only matters when there's a hundred reasons not to be-" Gen. Mattis

  8. #88
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    I voted that no woman should be on the dollar, only because IMO no woman is worthy...yet. Ask me again after we have a female POTUS or VP.

  9. #89
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Quote Originally Posted by tres borrachos View Post
    I voted that no woman should be on the dollar, only because IMO no woman is worthy...yet. Ask me again after we have a female POTUS or VP.
    My position is no one new unless they can support why. If it's just random, why not the first black pres? The first woman pres?

    I think the bar is/should be higher. Like based on achievements or contributions to our nation. If I was to choose anyone, it would be MLK.

    But I wasnt aware we were creating any new bills.


    I think it's a fun thread, it's gotten a little rancorous but I'd like to see it stay lighter-hearted.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have felt pain when I was in the womb. So when you say they are incapable of feeling pain, that is based on junk science.
    Quote Originally Posted by applejuicefool View Post
    A murderer putting a bullet through someone's brain is a medical procedure too.

  10. #90
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    Re: What Women Would You Put On The Dollar?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lursa View Post
    My position is no one new unless they can support why. If it's just random, why not the first black pres? The first woman pres?

    I think the bar is/should be higher. If I was to choose anyone, it would be MLK.

    But I wasnt aware we were creating any new bills.


    I think it's a fun thread, it's gotten a little rancorous but I'd like to see it stay lighter-hearted.
    Personally I think they should put our pictures on the dollar. Lursa/Tres - strong babes with brains!

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