View Poll Results: With regards to not in recess "recess" appointments...

Voters
15. You may not vote on this poll
  • Ignorant of Con Law and thus assumed it was constitutional?

    0 0%
  • Arrogant and Fringe on Con Law and thus firmly believed it constitutional

    2 13.33%
  • Oblivious to the constitutional implications and acted without thinking of it

    1 6.67%
  • Naively felt it had a reasonable chance of being constitutional, so gave it a shot

    1 6.67%
  • Realized likely unconstitutional, but gamble due to little fear of reprucussions

    8 53.33%
  • Realized almost certaintly unconstitutional, but did it anyways

    0 0%
  • Other

    3 20.00%
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Thread: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

  1. #31
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    Quote Originally Posted by Redress View Post
    Ah, so you have not even read about what you are ****ing commenting on.
    Only if you contort and strawman what I've said, but then again you've got your hackles raised so I guess that's how you're going to play it.

    Shame on you, you can do better than this.
    Ditto

    So clear cut that the justices did not agree on anything beyond the outcome...
    Gee...if only someone made a claim that the justices agreed on the same OUTCOME as opposed to the reasoning for that outcome

    "similar verdict." <---- oh wait, that was talking about the outcome and not the reasoning

    "issuing the same vote." <---- oh wait, that was talking about the outcome and not the reasoning

    "both saying 'Nope'. " <---- oh wait, that was talking about the outcome and not the reasoning

    Well ho-lee-****...someone DID claim they agreed on the OUTCOME. Yet you get on your goddamn high horse to say "shame on me"? Come at me with something other than this strawman **** if you think you're going to "shame" me into changing my mind. When I'm wrong about things I have no issue manning up on them, but like hell am I going to tuck tail and run because you want to get high and mighty battling a scarecrow. I don't know what toe tapping jolly ass two bit political hack who can't debate their way out of a wet paper bag you think I am but you sure as **** are confused about it Redress. You say I'm "better then this"? Then why don't you take two ****ing moments to step back, read what I'm saying, and ask yourself WHY someone like me may be bothered and asking such questions as opposed to immediately leaping forward to battle words I never wrote but you've imagined.

    I know and understand full well that the Alito and Scalia types came to their conclusion for a different reason than the Ginsburg and Kagan types...that doesn't change the FACT that they all came to the same conclusion, that this action WAS NOT CONSTITUTIONAL. Which was my entire point. If my point had been about their opinions then I would've said "opinions". I didn't. I spoke about the outcome. Regardless of whether or not you come at this from a judicially conservative or a judicially liberal manner, the end result is the same.

    NOT CONSTITUTIONAL

    It is so glaringly not constitutional that you can reach that conclusion via the routes of both ideologies, to the tune of NINE TO ZERO.

    Got any more strawmen and misrepresentations you want to throw my way in your effort to "shame" me? If not, how about you educate your own damn self before trying to lecture and "shame" me again.

  2. #32
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    Only if you contort and strawman what I've said, but then again you've got your hackles raised so I guess that's how you're going to play it.



    Ditto



    Gee...if only someone made a claim that the justices agreed on the same OUTCOME as opposed to the reasoning for that outcome

    "similar verdict." <---- oh wait, that was talking about the outcome and not the reasoning

    "issuing the same vote." <---- oh wait, that was talking about the outcome and not the reasoning

    "both saying "Nope". " <---- oh wait, that was talking about the outcome and not the reasoning

    Well ho-lee-****...you get on your goddamn high horse to say "shame on me". Come at me with something other than this strawman **** if you think you're going to shame me into changing my mind. When I'm wrong about things I have no issue manning up on them, but like hell am I going to tuck tail and run because you want to get high and mighty battling a scarecrow. I don't know what toe tapping jolly ass two bit political hack who can't debate their way out of a wet paper bag you think I am but you sure as **** are confused about it Redress.

    I know and understand full well that the Alito and Scalia types came to their conclusion for a different reason than the Ginsburg and Kagan types...that doesn't change the FACT that they all came to the same conclusion, that this action WAS NOT CONSTITUTIONAL. Which was my entire point. Regardless of whether or not you come at this from a judicially conservative or a judicially liberal manner, the end result is the same.

    NOT CONSTITUTIONAL

    It is so glaringly not constitutional that you can reach that conclusion via the routes of both ideologies, to the tune of NINE TO ZERO.

    Got any more strawmen and misrepresentations you want to throw my way in your pathetic effort to "shame" me?

    Educate your own damn self before lecturing others
    So even the justicves could not agree on the issues, and yet somehow it is in your mind clear cut? They even issued two different opinions. You really should have looked into this before getting on that high and mighty horse.
    We became a great nation not because we are a nation of cynics. We became a great nation because we are a nation of believers - Lindsey Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by Fiddytree View Post
    Uh oh Megyn...your vagina witchcraft is about ready to be exposed.

  3. #33
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    Quote Originally Posted by Redress View Post
    So even the justicves could not agree on the issues, and yet somehow it is in your mind clear cut?
    The fact that this was an unconstitutional action was clear cut, yes. Did I not make that clear the repeated times I have already stated such. The justices couldn't agree on the entire case and the nuanced reasons, but they all could agree on the very obvious basis that when the congress is actively calling itself into session that the Executive can't simply declare them NOT in session for the sake of recess appointments.

    You really should have looked into this
    Look, when you actually show that you've bothered to read my posts, and respond to what I actually say, I'll care about what you think I need to "look into" on this manner.

    From your own link:

    all nine Justices agreed that these particular recess appointments were invalid
    Which is exactly what I was suggesting. That unanimously they agreed that these appointments were not constitutional. There is no disputing that. Not by any measure.

    If I was talking about their opinion I would've said "their opinion". I fully understand the issue is complicated as to WHY it's unconstitutional and about the nuances of the case. That doesn't change the fact that the primary act in question had the same verdict DESPITE it being arrived at via two different styles of judicial ideology...that the act of declaring congress was "in recess" when they were actively having sessions (even if they were "pro forma"), and thus making recess appointments, was not constitutional. Both sides concluded that was NOT constitutional, understandably and obviously so. Did they judge the entire thing based on similar opinions and reasons? No, nor did I expect them to. But it was fully expected that they'd find the action, ultimately, unconstitutional...which was my entire point AND what I have said repeatedly if you'd bother to read what I wrote rather than assuming the worse and apparently waging into a battle against strawmen you've named "Zyphlin".

  4. #34
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    The fact that this was an unconstitutional action was clear cut, yes. Did I not make that clear the repeated times I have already stated such. The justices couldn't agree on the entire case and the nuanced reasons, but they all could agree on the very obvious basis that when the congress is actively calling itself into session that the Executive can't simply declare them NOT in session for the sake of recess appointments.
    No, actually it was not. Did you know that the court had to create a new standard with this ruling? One that had never been codified in law? It is true. Here, to quote from my source again since it explains it necely:

    Here the Court said that any recess that is shorter than three days is not long enough to make a recess appointment necessary. And a recess that is longer than three days but shorter than ten days will, in the normal case, also be too short to necessitate a recess appointment. (The Court added that there may be “very unusual” cases – such as a “national catastrophe . . . that renders the Senate unavailable but calls for an urgent response” – in which recess appointments would be permitted even though the recess was still shorter than ten days.)
    Look, when you actually show that you've bothered to read my posts, and respond to what I actually say, I'll care about what you think I need to "look into" on this manner.

    From your own link:
    Which is entirely and completely different from saying the case was predictable or clear cut.



    Which is exactly what I was suggesting. That unanimously they agreed that these appointments were not constitutional. There is no disputing that. Not by any measure.

    If I was talking about their opinion I would've said "their opinion". I fully understand the issue is complicated as to WHY it's unconstitutional and about the nuances of the case. That doesn't change the fact that the primary act in question had the same verdict DESPITE it being arrived at via two different styles of judicial ideology...that the act of declaring congress was "in recess" when they were actively having sessions (even if they were "pro forma"), and thus making recess appointments, was not constitutional. Both sides concluded that was NOT constitutional, understandably and obviously so. Did they judge the entire thing based on similar opinions and reasons? No, nor did I expect them to. But it was fully expected that they'd find the action, ultimately, unconstitutional...which was my entire point AND what I have said repeatedly if you'd bother to read what I wrote rather than assuming the worse and apparently waging into a battle against strawmen you've named "Zyphlin".
    Trying to suggest that because all 9 justices agreed on the outcome means that it is predictable is false. The justices themselves could not agree on the issues, and in fact, this ruling was in some ways a victory for Obama. Again from my source:

    The Court began with the first question presented in the case: whether the Constitution allows the president to make recess appointments during “intra-session” recesses (breaks that occur within the two one-year sessions between congressional elections) or only during “inter-session” recess (the break between the two one-year sessions). Its answer on this question is a victory for the Obama administration and future presidents who want to be able to make recess appointments...snip...

    The Court’s answer on the second question posed in the case – whether the president can use his recess appointment power to fill any vacancies that happen to exist when the Senate is in recess, or whether he is limited to vacancies that are created while the Senate is in recess – also favored the Obama administration.
    You are trying to make something complex into something simple, which is always going to fail. You could have prevented this by a little research. I recommend you do that in the future.
    We became a great nation not because we are a nation of cynics. We became a great nation because we are a nation of believers - Lindsey Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by Fiddytree View Post
    Uh oh Megyn...your vagina witchcraft is about ready to be exposed.

  5. #35
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    Quote Originally Posted by Redress View Post
    Which is entirely and completely different from saying the case was predictable or clear cut.
    Alright, and here is where I'm thru with you after this post unless you actually want to discuss things I'm actually saying. I've stated that the action Obama took was clearly unconstitutional, which it was. I did not suggest every facet of this case was predictable or clear cut, or the opinions would be, or the reasonings would be. I suggested that the fact that Obama's actions were unconstitutional was clear cut...and it was. I suggested that it was so clear cut that all nine justices found that it was unconstitutional, which they did.

    You want to continue to hump your strawman, be my guest. I'm not interested in a threesome. I've had a good conversation on this topic with everyone else in this thread, even amending my OP based on an individuals disagreement with part of it and opening my thought process up to another avenue that this could've been reached. You're the only person in here ignorantly and pathetically debating a strawman, shoving words in my mouth, and being more focused on your pathetic endeavor to "shame" me than actually engaging in conversation. I recommend you keep your recommendations to yourself, or give them to someone that gives a damn about your opinion on that matter because after your reactions from moment one in this thread I'm not one of them.

  6. #36
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    Other: Believed it was in question as to whether it would be considered by this SCOTUS as Constitutional, and took a chance; doing it to solve the problem of the Senate not fulfilling its duty.

    I just don't see it as cut and dried as you do.

    I am a strong, and rather radical, 2nd amendment supporter (bear with me for this seeming tangent). My support of it is based in what I hold to be the historical context combined with it's intent, and then I see if the language plausibly permits the intent I believe is there from all of the information. To me, that is the proper way to determine the Constitutionality of an action or law. If I didn't do that with the 2nd, I probably wouldn't be a supporter of its implications.

    Taking the same approach with the issue regarding recess appointments:

    Briefly, according to the thinking of the writers and the Americans who voted in the Constitution 1) I believe the Senate is expected to vote on nominees. I don't think the founders envisioned the Senate shirking that responsibility, and I think it should be unconstitutional for them to do so. 2) The provision for recess appointments was meant to take care of cases where the Senate could not vote, because it wasn't available to do so.

    Given the above, I don't think that the founders intended for the Senate to be able to hamstring the President's ability to name nominees for partisan ends.

    Times have certainly changed, as one justice noted that the recess provision is rather out of date, given that the Senate could really be available to vote on any nominee at any time should the need arise. But, if that is their attitude, then why not just blanket declare all recess appointments as Unconstitutional, since the Senate is never really out of session in the sense that the founders envisioned. They didn't do that, and so the fact is they do recognize that the Senate can still be in a valid recess with respect to the provision.

    If we are going with that, then the question becomes "when is it really in recess, and when is it not?" I don't agree with you that a Constitutional law can be circumvented by playing tricks, and no one of any honesty could claim that their tactic for staying in session was anything but a trick. So, I disagree with the SCOTUS: If there is anything that can still be called a 'recess' then the Senate was in it in any real sense. In addition, the Senate was Unconstitutionally shirking its responsibility, so this lends a small bit of support from the 'cannot vote' angle.

    I admit, I may be wrong because my approach may be wrong, or I may be taking it too far. I am sure there is a good chance even Obama wouldn't agree with me on the finer points of what I am saying. But, one thing I am certain of is that my interpretation comes closer to the original intent of the matter than the SCOTUS decision did. Anyone should admit that if the founders rewrote those parts of the Constitution to reflect things as they are today, they would certainly not permit the Senate to 'make all its own rules' any more, and would have laid at least some of them out in the Constitution to prevent the ridiculous situation we have today. I venture to guess, they may not have even allowed the Senate to confirm them any longer, since they abuse the power so readily. If Obama is wrong, he nevertheless understands the foregoing on some level, and certainly may have been blinded by that.

    I really don't think it was that huge of a stretch for Obama to think that it might be Constitutional, without any nefarious spin.
    Last edited by Dezaad; 07-02-14 at 09:46 PM.
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  7. #37
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    Re: Which is more likely regarding recess appointments

    "It is easier to beg for forgiveness, than to ask for permission."

    I think that pretty well covers it.

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