View Poll Results: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

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Thread: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

  1. #101
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernst barkmann View Post
    i hope you bring this up with other people who have discussed this with me....or is it just me, your talking too?
    I have discussed such things many times here and elsewhere.

    Confederates?????......my argument has nothing to do with the confederacy......where do you come up with that?
    Well you are parroting the Confederate argument on State sovereignty.

  2. #102
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by FreedomFromAll View Post
    I have discussed such things many times here and elsewhere.

    Well you are parroting the Confederate argument on State sovereignty.
    states are sovereign according to federalist 39.......nothing in constitutional laws states they are not sovereign, because we still have federalism.

  3. #103
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernst barkmann View Post
    states are sovereign according to federalist 39.......nothing in constitutional laws states they are not sovereign, because we still have federalism.
    They are sovereign. However, the constitution limits the nature of that sovereignty and it is clear that such sovereignty is subordinate to the sovereignty of the Federal government.

  4. #104
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    They are sovereign. However, the constitution limits the nature of that sovereignty and it is clear that such sovereignty is subordinate to the sovereignty of the Federal government.
    federalism is written in the constitution, a division of powers...states being vast, and federal being few........however they are not few today...because the feds have stepped deep into state powers...violating federalism.

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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernst barkmann View Post
    federalism is written in the constitution, a division of powers...states being vast, and federal being few........however they are not few today...because the feds have stepped deep into state powers...violating federalism.
    There is no quantitative description in the constitution on the nature of the sovereignty of states.

  6. #106
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    What????? I didn't know that. That can't be. If it's true the unions supported outsourcing, that is totally insane. Can you provide some reference to support that? That would be totally amazing.
    If anything, they supported it by making absurd demands and forcing employers' hands into taking their business elsewhere.

  7. #107
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
    If anything, they supported it by making absurd demands and forcing employers' hands into taking their business elsewhere.
    Forcing employers hands? Please

  8. #108
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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    There is no quantitative description in the constitution on the nature of the sovereignty of states.

    the constitution spells out what powers are where...this creates federalism......since states are sovereign they can act on those powers they have.

    people can act with their own rights they have.

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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernst barkmann View Post
    the constitution spells out what powers are where...this creates federalism......since states are sovereign they can act on those powers they have.

    people can act with their own rights they have.
    I don't disagree with that. What I disagree with is your assertion that the constitution quantifies the powers of the states as vast and those of the Federal government as few.

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    Re: Was Karl Marx Right About Capitalism?

    Quote Originally Posted by MildSteel View Post
    I don't disagree with that. What I disagree with is your assertion that the constitution quantifies the powers of the states as vast and those of the Federal government as few.

    ok....federalist 45--The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite. The former[ federal powers] will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce; with which last the power of taxation will, for the most part, be connected. The powers reserved to the several States will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people, and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the State.



    “With respect to the two words ‘general welfare,’ I have always regarded them as qualified by the detail of powers connected with them. To take them in a literal and unlimited sense would be a metamorphosis of the Constitution into a character which there is a host of proofs was not contemplated by its creators.” – James Madison in letter to James Robertson

    “[Congressional jurisdiction of power] is limited to certain enumerated objects, which concern all the members of the republic, but which are not to be attained by the separate provisions of any.” – James Madison, Federalist 14

    “The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined . . . to be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce.” – James Madison, Federalist 45

    “If Congress can do whatever in their discretion can be done by money, and will promote the General Welfare, the Government is no longer a limited one, possessing enumerated powers, but an indefinite one, subject to particular exceptions.” – James Madison, 1792

    “The Constitution allows only the means which are ‘necessary,’ not those which are merely ‘convenient,’ for effecting the enumerated powers. If such a latitude of construction be allowed to this phrase as to give any non-enumerated power, it will go to every one, for there is not one which ingenuity may not torture into a convenience in some instance or other, to some one of so long a list of enumerated powers. It would swallow up all the delegated powers, and reduce the whole to one power, as before observed” – Thomas Jefferson, 1791

    “Congress has not unlimited powers to provide for the general welfare, but only those specifically enumerated.” – Thomas Jefferson, 1798

    There you have it. James Madison, the Constitution’s author and Thomas Jefferson the author of the Declaration of Independence, specifically say that Congressional powers are to be limited and defined – unlike most modern interpretations!

    Admittedly, Jefferson and Madison were not our only Founders. These two were strict constitutionalists who feared the potential strength of any government. So let’s look at another Founder’s opinion—Alexander Hamilton who historically saw it in a somewhat looser vain.

    “This specification of particulars [the 18 enumerated powers of Article I, Section 8] evidently excludes all pretension to a general legislative authority, because an affirmative grant of special powers would be absurd as well as useless if a general authority was intended.” – Alexander Hamilton, Federalist 83

    Hamilton uncategorically states that all congressional powers are enumerated and that the very existence of these enumerations alone makes any belief that Congress has full and general legislative power to act as it desires nonsensical. If such broad congressional power had been the original intent, the constitutionally specified powers would have been worthless. In other words, why even enumerate any powers at all if the General Welfare clause could trump them?

    “No legislative act … contrary to the Constitution can be valid. To deny this would be to affirm that the deputy is greater than his principal; that the servant is above his master; that the representatives of the people are superior to the people themselves; that men acting by virtue of powers may do not only what their powers do not authorize, but what they forbid.” – Alexander Hamilton, Federalist 78

    In short, Hamilton tells us that since the powers of Congress are enumerated and limit Congress to those powers, any assumed authority outside those specified that don’t have a direct relation to those explicit powers must be contrary to the Constitution and therefore — unconstitutional.

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