View Poll Results: History: How Do You Feel?

Voters
19. You may not vote on this poll
  • I love it, and I try to see historical sites and museums as much as I can -- it's super important!

    15 78.95%
  • I like it, but I don't really go out of my way to seek it out. Not a big deal.

    3 15.79%
  • I just do not care about it either way -- you won't find me in a museum, but I don't hate it.

    1 5.26%
  • History's dangerous, we should focus on our society now. Not that important.

    0 0%
  • History's just a bunch of wars we've won and lost, who cares?

    0 0%
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: History: Love It, Hate It, Don't Care About It?

  1. #21
    Traveler

    Jack Hays's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamsburg, Virginia
    Last Seen
    Today @ 10:40 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    54,891
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: History: Love It, Hate It, Don't Care About It?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad_Captandum View Post
    I totally agree. You have to have an understanding of history in all its perspectives and facets, good, bad, and both.

    You need to know that the United States has lost plenty of wars. You need to know the United States has won plenty of wars, too.

    You need to know about the genocide of the Indians, but you need to know about Civil Rights, as well. You need to know that the US Civil War was as much about slavery, despite what revisionists say, as it was about states' rights.

    But you need to know other stuff too! You, as an American, need to know about the English Civil War, Parliamentarians vs. Royalists. You need to know about the French Revolution.

    You need to know that the Soviet Union really did win World War II, and it's okay to admit that, because it doesn't make Stalin any less of a monster to acknowledge it. You need to know that the United States commanded its troops not to loot Beijing when the British were auctioning off the Forbidden City's treasures. But you need to know that the Americans tortured people in Abu Ghraib, too.

    I think it's really, really fundamental to understand that every country has done good and bad. That's not a nice way of saying America needs to know it's done some ****ty stuff -- I think most Americans know that. What I also want Americans to know is that Russia and the Soviet Union also did lots of really great stuff.

    History's the story of everyone, and it must be told right.
    The Red Army certainly shouldered the main burden of ground war against the Wehrmacht and Waffen SS, but the US 8th Air Force destroyed the Luftwaffe and in coordinated attacks with Britain's Bomber Command crippled German industry. After 6 June 1944 the western allies occupied about one third of German ground power, and the units that Hitler threw into the Battle of the Bulge were not available to stop the Soviets in the East. Sometimes overlooked, Red Army logistics relied heavily on US-made trucks. And finally, the USSR played virtually no role in the defeat of Japan. That was US work, with modest assistance from the Brits.
    Last edited by Jack Hays; 05-10-14 at 05:09 PM.
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

  2. #22
    Advisor Amanda1858's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    California
    Last Seen
    08-20-15 @ 01:21 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Moderate
    Posts
    592

    Re: History: Love It, Hate It, Don't Care About It?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad_Captandum View Post
    Hello everyone.

    It crossed my mind a few days ago that a shocking number of people don't seem to know or care much about the history of their own country, let alone the world. This, to me, is lunacy -- I love history, and I can't get enough of it.

    To me, history is the story of where humanity has been, how we got where we are, and even where we're going. It is vitally important to understand history to understand politics, philosophy, law, or really any other element of our society.

    So I put the question to you, Debate Politics. Are you history buffs? Do you go out of your way to learn more about history? Do you think it's as vital to understanding politics as I do?

    Or am I living in the past?
    History is very important to me. When my sister and I went to Dallas, Texas a few years ago to visit her son, one of the first places I wanted to see was Dealy Plaza. It was just fascinating to actually look at the Texas School Book depository, the grassy knoll, etc. The next place I want to visit is Washington, DC.
    "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice"---Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  3. #23
    Advisor
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Britain, Mother of Civilisation
    Last Seen
    @
    Gender
    Lean
    Socialist
    Posts
    468

    Re: History: Love It, Hate It, Don't Care About It?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hays View Post
    The Red Army certainly shouldered the main burden of ground war against the Wehrmacht and Waffen SS, but the US 8th Air Force destroyed the Luftwaffe and in coordinated attacks with Britain's Bomber Command crippled German industry. After 6 June 1944 the western allies occupied about one third of German ground power, and the units that Hitler threw into the Battle of the Bulge were not available to stop the Soviets in the East. Sometimes overlooked, Red Army logistics relied heavily on US-made trucks. And finally, the USSR played virtually no role in the defeat of Japan. That was US work, with modest assistance from the Brits.
    While I'm not particularly interested in debating who won World War II (because it does come up SO often -- and it's always left with: Yep, the Soviets did the dying, the Americans did the buying, and the Brits did the flying), I would like to point out a little-known theatre of the war:

    The Soviet Far East. It was the Red Army that defeated the majority of the Japanese Army, and captured the entire Kwantung Army in Manchuria in 1945. While the US took care of the IJN, the Red Army, mixed with China, the British Empire, and Asian partisans were the main forces against the Imperial Japanese Army.

    In fact, some historians think that the reason Japan surrendered when it did was as much because they were scared the Soviets would invade as the atomic bombings.

    Fascinating, huh?

    Edit: Wikipedia seems to think that the Soviet Air Force engaged and destroyed more than 70% of the Luftwaffe. Do you have any evidence that this is incorrect?

  4. #24
    Traveler

    Jack Hays's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamsburg, Virginia
    Last Seen
    Today @ 10:40 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    54,891
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: History: Love It, Hate It, Don't Care About It?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad_Captandum View Post
    While I'm not particularly interested in debating who won World War II (because it does come up SO often -- and it's always left with: Yep, the Soviets did the dying, the Americans did the buying, and the Brits did the flying), I would like to point out a little-known theatre of the war:

    The Soviet Far East. It was the Red Army that defeated the majority of the Japanese Army, and captured the entire Kwantung Army in Manchuria in 1945. While the US took care of the IJN, the Red Army, mixed with China, the British Empire, and Asian partisans were the main forces against the Imperial Japanese Army.

    In fact, some historians think that the reason Japan surrendered when it did was as much because they were scared the Soviets would invade as the atomic bombings.

    Fascinating, huh?

    Edit: Wikipedia seems to think that the Soviet Air Force engaged and destroyed more than 70% of the Luftwaffe. Do you have any evidence that this is incorrect?
    By 1945 the Kwantung Army was a hollow shell of its former self, with much of its strength withdrawn to the home islands to oppose the expected US invasion. Soviet impact against the Japanese army was negligible. As for the Luftwaffe, the 70% number only works if quality is discounted. The best aircraft and pilots were in the west to oppose the US and UK over Germany itself.
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •