View Poll Results: Is this acceptable?

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  • Yeah, so what. 'Merica!

    10 34.48%
  • No, this is ridiculous

    17 58.62%
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Thread: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

  1. #1
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    Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Average download speeds by country below. This is a good indicator of the state of infrastructural development in each country. Once upon a time, the United States was the most developed country in the world. Now, we lag behind almost everybody.

    In my opinion, this is an unacceptable report card. America gets an "F." We need legislative action to fix it immediately. What say you?



    *All values in mbps

    1. Hong Kong 72.06
    2. Singapore 60.76
    3. Romania 56.81
    4. South Korea 51.70
    5. Japan 42.24
    6. Sweden 40.80
    7. Lithuania 39.99
    8. Andorra 39.84
    9. Macau 39.83
    10. Netherlands 39.35
    11. Switzerland 38.82
    12. Denmark 36.54
    13. Taiwan 35.71
    14. Luxemborg 34.22
    15. Latvia 33.54
    16. Iceland 32.21
    17. Moldova 30.98
    18. Bulgaria 29.09
    19. Belgium 28.97
    20. Norway 27.29
    21. France 27.18
    22. Finland 26.63
    23. Germany 25.20
    24. Portugal 24.95
    25. Hungary 24.21
    26. Estonia 24.17
    27. Czech 23.70
    28. UK 23.48
    29. Aland 23.23
    30. Liechtenstein 23.14
    31. Israel 21.80
    32. United States 21.48
    33. Russia 21.28
    36. Canada 20.29
    44. China 16.76
    87 Italy 7.78


    **All data from ooka.com

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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Here's an interesting read from MIT Technology Review:

    When will the rest of us get Google Fiber?

    By David Talbot on February 4, 2013



    Much of the United States has far slower Internet-access connections than are available in Asian and European countries.


    Wired up: Google is installing and running ultrafast Internet fiber to homes in Kansas City.

    Call it the miracle on Francis Street. Last year Ryan and Jenny Carpenter got a deal seemingly too good to be true in their Kansas City, Missouri, neighborhood: an installer from Google Fiber wired their bungalow to give them at least 50 times their previous Internet access speed and a substantially better TV service, all for only $125 a month, tax included—just a few dollars more than they’d been paying Time Warner Cable.

    Ryan Carpenter still speaks in amazed tones of the December night when he simultaneously streamed four high-definition TV shows (two Christmas specials, an episode of The Office, and a Kansas University basketball game), recording three of them on the included two-terabyte DVR. That’s two more shows than he could previously watch at once, with plenty of capacity to spare. “It just blows my mind—we can be running video via Wi-Fi on two smartphones and on two laptops, and also be watching and recording TV shows all at the same time,” he says. “It’s a vastly superior service.” And that’s even without touching high-bandwidth Web apps that work seamlessly at superfast speeds, such as 3-D maps of cities that have imperceptible load times.


    The question of how Google offered this value is a mystery to the couple—and to much of the rest of the nation. It’s not that the technology involved is groundbreaking; the fiber and connections are off-the-shelf technology. Yet Google’s supercharged service is priced at just $70 per month, or $120 with bundled television, plus tax. And a Google spokeswoman says the company “expects to operate profitably” and that Google Fiber is neither a loss leader nor a PR stunt.

    If that’s true, then why isn’t it being made available everywhere? The answer is that there are no compelling business incentives for the established players, says Blair Levin, a former U.S. Federal Communications Commission chief of staff, who helped write the National Broadband Plan and is now executive director of Gig.U.

    In parts of the country, slower-speed copper, fast-download cable, and a few fiber networks are already built out. The cable distribution giants like Time Warner Cable and Comcast are already making a 97 percent margin on their “almost comically profitable” Internet services, according to Craig Moffet, an analyst at the Wall Street firm Bernstein Research. As Levin points out, “If you are making that kind of margin, it’s hard to improve it.” And most Americans have no choice but to deal with their local cable company.

    While Verizon operates the fiber network serving the largest number of home subscribers in the nation, the company is backing off from installing additional U.S. fiber connectivity. The company’s fiber service, called FiOS, offers basic service starting at 15 megabits per second (which can be upgraded in some areas to as much as 300 megabits per second). As of last year, FiOS had about 5 million subscribers—or roughly one-third of the possible market where the company has strung fiber. But CFO Fran Shammo said in a conference call last fall that there are no plans to expand FiOS beyond those areas. “At this point we have to capitalize on what we have invested,” he said. The basic goal is to sign up more people in the existing service areas, which adds the most revenue without increasing capital costs.

    The story is similar with other carriers: Comcast’s Xfinity Platinum offers 300 megabit-per-second download cable service in some locations (for about $300 a month), and Time Warner Cable is installing some fiber in New York City office buildings, but the companies are focused on capitalizing on existing cable infrastructure, not emulating Google Fiber by building out fiber connections to homes and businesses. In Kansas City, Time Warner Cable in late January (likely in response to Google Fiber’s presence) boosted speeds and lowered prices, offering download speeds of 100 megabits per second for $75 a month.


    But overall, the United States languishes in the middle of the pack of the world’s developed nations in Internet access speeds, with average download speeds of just 11.6 megabits per second. In many Asian and European countries, customers can commonly get affordable service providing hundreds of megabits or more.

    So what would it take to get Google Fiber–like service everywhere else in the United States? Not everyone has the ambition and the deep pockets to wage long-term, labor-intensive, block-by-block warfare with existing, well-heeled telecom companies. “Other startups trying to disrupt the Comcasts, Verizons, and Time Warners of the world will need similar access to capital” as can be found in Google’s deep pockets, Crawford says.

    Crawford says broader access to low-interest financing would help, as would federal legislation to supersede state laws that make it hard for local governments to build networks. For example, in 2011, after the city of Wilson, North Carolina, built its own fast network—competing with existing carriers—the North Carolina legislature, amid industry lobbying, passed a law that made it harder for local governments to build networks and prevented Wilson from expanding its network beyond a county line, she said.

    But even if costs and legal barriers are lowered, fiber economics won’t work for private companies everywhere—not even for Google. After all, as Levin points out, 80 percent of the cost of running fiber is in the labor, not the fiber and equipment, and not all houses are as closely spaced as the tidy bungalows on Francis Street, where the Carpenters live. “There are a lot of cities where the math wouldn’t work—areas not densely built enough or where construction costs are too high. In California, the environmental permitting provisions make it cost-prohibitive,” Levin added.

    The FCC says it wants to help. Last month, at a U.S. Conference of Mayors meeting, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski called for broadband providers and state and city officials to build out at least one “gigabit community” in all 50 states by 2015. And the FCC plans to hold workshops in which broadband providers and state and municipal leaders can find and remove barriers, lower costs, and boost incentives for getting it done.

    At any such meetings, it’s likely that Google’s strategy and example will be a central topic. To help keep labor costs as low as possible, Google secured guarantees from the Kansas City government that it would get rapid responses on mundane but important matters like city inspections, access to rights-of-way, and even free rein to run fiber in sewers. Kansas City says it will provide the same breaks to other companies willing to provide similar service. Google also adopted a novel preregistration scheme, which had it start stringing fiber in a given neighborhood only after a certain percentage of residents—5 to 25 percent—committed to the service.

    It’s a good start, but the United States has a long road ahead to achieve widespread one-gigabit service. Not every town has a university. Not every mayor can get his or her hands on low-interest financing. The FCC’s efforts may fall short, and it’s possible that Congress and the FCC won’t make it easier for upstarts to compete with major carriers.

    That might well leave Google or other aggressive companies to do the job. Crawford and Levin say they expect Google to expand to other cities. If that happens, then Google, with its long-term sights on Web advertising dollars, might wind up giving an entirely new meaning to the term “sponsored link.”

  3. #3
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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    Average download speeds by country below. This is a good indicator of the state of infrastructural development in each country. Once upon a time, the United States was the most developed country in the world. Now, we lag behind almost everybody.

    In my opinion, this is an unacceptable report card. America gets an "F." We need legislative action to fix it immediately. What say you?



    *All values in mbps

    1. Hong Kong 72.06
    2. Singapore 60.76
    3. Romania 56.81
    4. South Korea 51.70
    5. Japan 42.24
    6. Sweden 40.80
    7. Lithuania 39.99
    8. Andorra 39.84
    9. Macau 39.83
    10. Netherlands 39.35
    11. Switzerland 38.82
    12. Denmark 36.54
    13. Taiwan 35.71
    14. Luxemborg 34.22
    15. Latvia 33.54
    16. Iceland 32.21
    17. Moldova 30.98
    18. Bulgaria 29.09
    19. Belgium 28.97
    20. Norway 27.29
    21. France 27.18
    22. Finland 26.63
    23. Germany 25.20
    24. Portugal 24.95
    25. Hungary 24.21
    26. Estonia 24.17
    27. Czech 23.70
    28. UK 23.48
    29. Aland 23.23
    30. Liechtenstein 23.14
    31. Israel 21.80
    32. United States 21.48
    33. Russia 21.28
    36. Canada 20.29
    44. China 16.76
    87 Italy 7.78


    **All data from ooka.com

    My speed is fine.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    My speed is fine.
    Is it "fine?"

    Your speed means that the AVERAGE user in 15 different countries have faster internet than you. The average user doesn't pay for the premium speed. And I'm sure you pay for the premium speed.

  5. #5
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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Size matters. If you look at the countries at the bottom of the list, they are the largest countries, area-wise, in the world. Creating infrastructure over an area the size of the US is much more daunting than doing it over the size of Hong Kong.
    "Never fear. Him is here" - Captain Chaos (Dom DeLuise), Cannonball Run

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  6. #6
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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    Is it "fine?"
    Yes it is fine. I can download a 1 gig movie less than 5 minutes. I do not play online shooters.Nor do I play online RPGs. I could care less if Debatepolitics comes in 1/2 a second faster. Are you really going to complain because you have to wait 4-5 minutes to download a 1 gig size movie instead of downloading it in 1-2 minutes? I could understand complaining if everyone in the US was still using telephone internet service while everyone else in the world has high speed internet.

    Your speed means that the AVERAGE user in 15 different countries have faster internet than you.
    I could care less.

    The average user doesn't pay for the premium speed. And I'm sure you pay for the premium speed.
    Premium is up to a 100 Mbps download speed and 20 Mbps upload speed.Cox calls that Ultimate instead of premium. I do not have that service.
    Last edited by jamesrage; 02-27-14 at 07:26 AM.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    My speed is fine.
    Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?-netspeed-jpg

    For just 12 euros. And I'm also streaming right now.

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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    We got the best internet in the world.
    God Bless the Marine Corps.

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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    I could care less.


    Premium is up to a 100 Mbps download speed and 20 Mbps upload speed.Cox calls that Ultimate instead of premium. I do not have that service.
    As you know.

  10. #10
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    Re: Is your slow American internet acceptable to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rainman05 View Post
    As you know.
    I find this grammar fag/nazi video a littler funnier.

    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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