View Poll Results: Do you support school choice?

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  • Yes

    69 67.65%
  • Yes but with certain exceptions. (Please list those exceptions.)

    16 15.69%
  • No, students should only go to schools in their public school district.

    4 3.92%
  • other

    10 9.80%
  • I do not know

    3 2.94%
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Thread: Do you support school choice?

  1. #1
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    Do you support school choice?

    Do you support school choice?

    Yes
    Yes but with certain exceptions. Please list those exceptions.
    no, students should only go to schools in their public school district.
    other
    maybe


    School choice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Open enrollment

    Open enrollment refers to educational policies which allow residents of a state to enroll their children in any public school, provided the school has not reached its maximum capacity number for students, regardless of the school district in which a family resides.
    Open enrollment can be either intra-district or inter-district. Intra-district choice allows parents to send their children to any school within their designated district. Parents can enroll their children in schools outside of their catchment area. Inter-district school choice allows parents to select public schools outside of their resident district.[1]
    Inequality of Open Enrollment

    An open enrollment policy allows parents to choose the school they want their children to attend from any of the schools in their area, provided there is space for them. This definition gives the impression that everyone has an equal opportunity to choose a school, but the reality of such equality has been called into question.[2] For example, in rural areas the option of taking advantage of open enrollment is greatly diminished because of limited access to alternate schools.


    Vouchers

    Main article: School voucher
    When the government pays tuition to a private school on behalf of the parents, this is usually referred to as a voucher. A voucher is given to the family for them to spend at any school of their choice for their child's study. The two most common voucher designs are universal vouchers and means-tested vouchers. Means-tested vouchers are directed towards low-income families and constitute the bulk of voucher plans in the United States.
    Tuition tax credits

    A tuition tax credit is similar to most other familiar tax credits. Certain states allow individuals and/or businesses to deduct a certain amount of their income taxes to donate to education. Depending on the program, these donations can either go to a public school or to a School Tuition Organization (STO), or both. The donations that go to public schools are often used to help pay for after-school programs, schools trips, or school supplies. The donations that go to School Tuition Organizations are used by the STO to create scholarships that are then given to students. These programs currently exist in Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island in the United States.[8]
    Charter schools

    Main article: Charter school
    Charter schools are public schools with more relaxed rules and regulations. These relaxed rules tend to deal with things like Teacher Union contracts and state curriculum. The majority of states (and the District of Columbia) have charter school laws. Minnesota was the first state to have a charter school law and the first charter school in the United States, City Academy High School, opened in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1992.[9]
    Dayton, Ohio has between 22–26% of all children in charter schools.[10] This is the highest percentage in the nation. Other hotbeds for charter schools are Kansas City (24%), Washington, D.C. (20-24%) and Arizona. Almost 1 in 4 public schools in Arizona are charter schools, comprising about 8% of total enrollment.
    Charter schools can also come in the form of Cyber Charters. Cyber charter schools deliver the majority of their instruction over the internet instead of in a school building. And, like charter schools, they are public schools, but free of many of the rules and regulations that public schools must follow.
    Magnet schools

    Main article: Magnet school
    Magnet schools are public schools that often have a specialized function like science, technology or art. These magnet schools, unlike charter schools, are not open to all children. Much like many private schools, there are some (but not all) magnet schools that require a test to get in.
    Home schooling

    Main article: Homeschooling
    "Home education" or "home schooling" is instruction in a child's home, or provided primarily by a parent, or under direct parental control. Informal home education has always taken place, and formal instruction in the home has at times also been very popular. As public education grew in popularity during the 1900s, however, the number of people educated at home using a planned curriculum dropped. In the last 20 years, in contrast, the number of children being formally educated at home has grown tremendously, in particular in the United States. The laws relevant to home education differ throughout the country. In some states the parent simply needs to notify the state that the child will be educated at home. In other states the parents are not free to educate at home unless at least one parent is a certified teacher and yearly progress reports are reviewed by the state. Such laws are not always enforced however. According to the federal government, about 1.1 million children were home educated in 2003.[11]




    I do support school choice.The future of our kids is more important than any job security of any teacher. We can not wait until they fix **** at the local level while our children's education suffers because unions do not want to allow us to easily fire bad teachers or reform their teaching programs. Plus the tax dollars used to educate that child should follow that child regardless if that child goes to a public school,charter school or a voucher for a private school.
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Absolutely. People should have a selection where they can educate their child. The only people that oppose this are statists that don't want competition between schools. Taking someone's money then forcing their kid to go to an inferior school when a better one is available is distinctly anti-liberty.
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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    Do you support school choice?

    Yes
    Yes but with certain exceptions. Please list those exceptions.
    no, students should only go to schools in their public school district.
    other
    maybe


    School choice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Open enrollment

    Open enrollment refers to educational policies which allow residents of a state to enroll their children in any public school, provided the school has not reached its maximum capacity number for students, regardless of the school district in which a family resides.
    Open enrollment can be either intra-district or inter-district. Intra-district choice allows parents to send their children to any school within their designated district. Parents can enroll their children in schools outside of their catchment area. Inter-district school choice allows parents to select public schools outside of their resident district.[1]
    Inequality of Open Enrollment

    An open enrollment policy allows parents to choose the school they want their children to attend from any of the schools in their area, provided there is space for them. This definition gives the impression that everyone has an equal opportunity to choose a school, but the reality of such equality has been called into question.[2] For example, in rural areas the option of taking advantage of open enrollment is greatly diminished because of limited access to alternate schools.


    Vouchers

    Main article: School voucher
    When the government pays tuition to a private school on behalf of the parents, this is usually referred to as a voucher. A voucher is given to the family for them to spend at any school of their choice for their child's study. The two most common voucher designs are universal vouchers and means-tested vouchers. Means-tested vouchers are directed towards low-income families and constitute the bulk of voucher plans in the United States.
    Tuition tax credits

    A tuition tax credit is similar to most other familiar tax credits. Certain states allow individuals and/or businesses to deduct a certain amount of their income taxes to donate to education. Depending on the program, these donations can either go to a public school or to a School Tuition Organization (STO), or both. The donations that go to public schools are often used to help pay for after-school programs, schools trips, or school supplies. The donations that go to School Tuition Organizations are used by the STO to create scholarships that are then given to students. These programs currently exist in Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island in the United States.[8]
    Charter schools

    Main article: Charter school
    Charter schools are public schools with more relaxed rules and regulations. These relaxed rules tend to deal with things like Teacher Union contracts and state curriculum. The majority of states (and the District of Columbia) have charter school laws. Minnesota was the first state to have a charter school law and the first charter school in the United States, City Academy High School, opened in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1992.[9]
    Dayton, Ohio has between 22–26% of all children in charter schools.[10] This is the highest percentage in the nation. Other hotbeds for charter schools are Kansas City (24%), Washington, D.C. (20-24%) and Arizona. Almost 1 in 4 public schools in Arizona are charter schools, comprising about 8% of total enrollment.
    Charter schools can also come in the form of Cyber Charters. Cyber charter schools deliver the majority of their instruction over the internet instead of in a school building. And, like charter schools, they are public schools, but free of many of the rules and regulations that public schools must follow.
    Magnet schools

    Main article: Magnet school
    Magnet schools are public schools that often have a specialized function like science, technology or art. These magnet schools, unlike charter schools, are not open to all children. Much like many private schools, there are some (but not all) magnet schools that require a test to get in.
    Home schooling

    Main article: Homeschooling
    "Home education" or "home schooling" is instruction in a child's home, or provided primarily by a parent, or under direct parental control. Informal home education has always taken place, and formal instruction in the home has at times also been very popular. As public education grew in popularity during the 1900s, however, the number of people educated at home using a planned curriculum dropped. In the last 20 years, in contrast, the number of children being formally educated at home has grown tremendously, in particular in the United States. The laws relevant to home education differ throughout the country. In some states the parent simply needs to notify the state that the child will be educated at home. In other states the parents are not free to educate at home unless at least one parent is a certified teacher and yearly progress reports are reviewed by the state. Such laws are not always enforced however. According to the federal government, about 1.1 million children were home educated in 2003.[11]




    I do support school choice.The future of our kids is more important than any job security of any teacher. We can not wait until they fix **** at the local level while our children's education suffers because unions do not want to allow us to easily fire bad teachers or reform their teaching programs. Plus the tax dollars used to educate that child should follow that child regardless if that child goes to a public school,charter school or a voucher for a private school.
    I suppose all but vouchers to religious church rule schools. That should not be paid by tax dollars nor a basis for tax deference or avoidance.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    I neither support or oppose school choice as such, but I certainly don't see it as the magical solution to the wider problems with any education system. While there is a fixed supply and quality of education provision, any time one child is offered a "better" place, all the other children between them get shuffled down a step.

    In real-world practice, such systems just mean the parents with the time, money, ability and determination can lock out all the best places. Once they have them, they've no interest in improving the wider system, only maintaining the status quo. It's even explicitly stated sometimes, with suggestions that "bad" schools are actively denied resources and allowed to die out, ignoring the harm to all of the children attending them while this is happening. A lot of the people (especially parents) strongly supporting choice see themselves in this position (regardless of whether they recognise or admit it). They wouldn't stand for it if their children were at one of these "bad" schools being slowly wound down but don't seem concerned about other children in that situation.

    There is plenty to fix and improve in education but I don't see this as the way to do it. It's about "my children", not "our children".

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by RabidAlpaca View Post
    Absolutely. People should have a selection where they can educate their child. The only people that oppose this are statists that don't want competition between schools. Taking someone's money then forcing their kid to go to an inferior school when a better one is available is distinctly anti-liberty.
    Agree and I believe the tax money should follow the child. No one should have to double pay.

  6. #6
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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    I support parents being able to send their kids to public schools, private schools, magnet schools, or homeschooling if they choose to do so. I only think vouchers should be available when the local public school system is failing. Otherwise if you want your kids to go to a private school, it should be fully on your own dime. It seems to me that many of the people that are in favor of vouchers are not parents in the inner city, though some of them are for good reason, but rather conservative evangelicals and fundamentalists that oppose teaching evolution and other aspects of modern science in school and thus want the taxpayers to pick up the tab for their kids to go to a religious school that shares their views. For example, the public school district our kids are in outperforms every private school in the metro by every statistical measure, yet you have fundamentalists in the district that want a voucher system because they want to send their kids to a school that teaches creationism.
    "You're the only person that decides how far you'll go and what you're capable of." - Ben Saunders (Explorer and Endurance Athlete)

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernDemocrat View Post
    Otherwise if you want your kids to go to a private school, it should be fully on your own dime.
    Sounds good, just let them opt out of taxes paying for other kids.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    School "vouchers" are often accompanied by too many restrictions, but can also have too few restrictions.

    One example of too many restrictions is making the issue of a voucher depend on the "performance" of the normally assigned public school (compared only to other public schools) - that is insane since the voucher could be used anywhere.

    One example of too few restrictions is for a voucher to be used by a "home school" parent or an "educational" institution that is never inspected/evaluated for its educational outcome - perhaps the voucher could be paid after the fact, based on the educational improvement of that individual student.

    In general, vouchers should never be for the full amount of the public educational expense and probably should not exceed 80% of the average, per pupil, public educational cost.
    “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists to adapt the world to himself.
    Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” ― George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by scatt View Post
    Sounds good, just let them opt out of taxes paying for other kids.
    That is not how society works anywhere. You don't get to choose which taxes you want to pay. Its not a cafeteria plan. You tend to argue things like the world should work how you imagine it, rather than how it is.
    "You're the only person that decides how far you'll go and what you're capable of." - Ben Saunders (Explorer and Endurance Athlete)

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernDemocrat View Post
    That is not how society works anywhere.
    I know, private school parents pay for everyone's kids to go to school through taxation, and they pay for their kid to go to school with after tax funds.

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