View Poll Results: Do you support school choice?

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  • Yes

    69 67.65%
  • Yes but with certain exceptions. (Please list those exceptions.)

    16 15.69%
  • No, students should only go to schools in their public school district.

    4 3.92%
  • other

    10 9.80%
  • I do not know

    3 2.94%
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Thread: Do you support school choice?

  1. #571
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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    You are.
    BS. One of the wealthiest communities in MA is Weston, MA. They spend around $20,000 per child while Taunton (a poor town) spends nearly half that amount.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrage View Post
    Do you support school choice?

    Yes
    Yes but with certain exceptions. Please list those exceptions.
    no, students should only go to schools in their public school district.
    other
    maybe


    School choice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Open enrollment

    Open enrollment refers to educational policies which allow residents of a state to enroll their children in any public school, provided the school has not reached its maximum capacity number for students, regardless of the school district in which a family resides.
    Open enrollment can be either intra-district or inter-district. Intra-district choice allows parents to send their children to any school within their designated district. Parents can enroll their children in schools outside of their catchment area. Inter-district school choice allows parents to select public schools outside of their resident district.[1]
    Inequality of Open Enrollment

    An open enrollment policy allows parents to choose the school they want their children to attend from any of the schools in their area, provided there is space for them. This definition gives the impression that everyone has an equal opportunity to choose a school, but the reality of such equality has been called into question.[2] For example, in rural areas the option of taking advantage of open enrollment is greatly diminished because of limited access to alternate schools.


    Vouchers

    Main article: School voucher
    When the government pays tuition to a private school on behalf of the parents, this is usually referred to as a voucher. A voucher is given to the family for them to spend at any school of their choice for their child's study. The two most common voucher designs are universal vouchers and means-tested vouchers. Means-tested vouchers are directed towards low-income families and constitute the bulk of voucher plans in the United States.
    Tuition tax credits

    A tuition tax credit is similar to most other familiar tax credits. Certain states allow individuals and/or businesses to deduct a certain amount of their income taxes to donate to education. Depending on the program, these donations can either go to a public school or to a School Tuition Organization (STO), or both. The donations that go to public schools are often used to help pay for after-school programs, schools trips, or school supplies. The donations that go to School Tuition Organizations are used by the STO to create scholarships that are then given to students. These programs currently exist in Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island in the United States.[8]
    Charter schools

    Main article: Charter school
    Charter schools are public schools with more relaxed rules and regulations. These relaxed rules tend to deal with things like Teacher Union contracts and state curriculum. The majority of states (and the District of Columbia) have charter school laws. Minnesota was the first state to have a charter school law and the first charter school in the United States, City Academy High School, opened in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1992.[9]
    Dayton, Ohio has between 22–26% of all children in charter schools.[10] This is the highest percentage in the nation. Other hotbeds for charter schools are Kansas City (24%), Washington, D.C. (20-24%) and Arizona. Almost 1 in 4 public schools in Arizona are charter schools, comprising about 8% of total enrollment.
    Charter schools can also come in the form of Cyber Charters. Cyber charter schools deliver the majority of their instruction over the internet instead of in a school building. And, like charter schools, they are public schools, but free of many of the rules and regulations that public schools must follow.
    Magnet schools

    Main article: Magnet school
    Magnet schools are public schools that often have a specialized function like science, technology or art. These magnet schools, unlike charter schools, are not open to all children. Much like many private schools, there are some (but not all) magnet schools that require a test to get in.
    Home schooling

    Main article: Homeschooling
    "Home education" or "home schooling" is instruction in a child's home, or provided primarily by a parent, or under direct parental control. Informal home education has always taken place, and formal instruction in the home has at times also been very popular. As public education grew in popularity during the 1900s, however, the number of people educated at home using a planned curriculum dropped. In the last 20 years, in contrast, the number of children being formally educated at home has grown tremendously, in particular in the United States. The laws relevant to home education differ throughout the country. In some states the parent simply needs to notify the state that the child will be educated at home. In other states the parents are not free to educate at home unless at least one parent is a certified teacher and yearly progress reports are reviewed by the state. Such laws are not always enforced however. According to the federal government, about 1.1 million children were home educated in 2003.[11]




    I do support school choice.The future of our kids is more important than any job security of any teacher. We can not wait until they fix **** at the local level while our children's education suffers because unions do not want to allow us to easily fire bad teachers or reform their teaching programs. Plus the tax dollars used to educate that child should follow that child regardless if that child goes to a public school,charter school or a voucher for a private school.
    I support choice as far as charter schools and private schools, but I don't know how I feel about allowing people to send their children to public schools outside of their districts because I don't know what effects that would have. Would some schools have to shut down because they don't have enough students/attendance. I would really like to see the inner city schools evaluated and problems fixed.

    I think there are teachers that aren't very good out there, but a lot of the teachers who teach in inner city schools are dedicated and good teachers, they just have to deal with the roughest bunch of students.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by rabbitcaebannog View Post
    BS. One of the wealthiest communities in MA is Weston, MA. They spend around $20,000 per child while Taunton (a poor town) spends nearly half that amount.
    Taunton's school expenditures are $91m a year to Weston's $47m a year.

    bs right back at ya.
    ”People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both.” --- Ben Franklin

    Quote Originally Posted by The German View Post
    Sterotypes are mostly based on truths.

  4. #574
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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    Taunton's school expenditures are $91m a year to Weston's $47m a year.

    bs right back at ya.
    Um, that's because they have a MUCH bigger population

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    Poorly performing schools, which take the lions share of funding, are going to lose a far higher percentage of students when parents get the choice to send them elsewhere, I guarantee it. Schools that perform well will lose very few students, so few that the argument is moot.
    Most public schools are funded by local property taxes. When the local residents are rich, property values are higher and the locals approve higher taxes to improve the schools, the schools receive more money. When the residents are poor, property values lower, the population density higher and the locals don't support (or can't afford) higher taxes to improve the schools, the schools receive less money. That is one of the major problems with public education and it is one that few people want to address; the schools in low income areas have the most challenging student, yet they are underfunded and can not attract the best teachers because the pay is lower and the work more difficult. Vouchers do not address that fundamental problem, they will make it worse by taking more money from already underfunded and over burdened schools and give it to the best funded schools with the easiest students and most supportive parents.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    Most public schools are funded by local property taxes. When the local residents are rich, property values are higher and the locals approve higher taxes to improve the schools, the schools receive more money. When the residents are poor, property values lower, the population density higher and the locals don't support (or can't afford) higher taxes to improve the schools, the schools receive less money. That is one of the major problems with public education and it is one that few people want to address; the schools in low income areas have the most challenging student, yet they are underfunded and can not attract the best teachers because the pay is lower and the work more difficult. Vouchers do not address that fundamental problem, they will make it worse by taking more money from already underfunded and over burdened schools and give it to the best funded schools with the easiest students and most supportive parents.
    Vouchers enable parents to take their children out of underperforming schools and send them to better performing schools.
    "It's always reassuring to find you've made the right enemies." -- William J. Donovan

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by rabbitcaebannog View Post
    Um, that's because they have a MUCH bigger population
    Right, with far more schools, some of which perform better than others. Those underperforming schools, within that district, receive higher funding than the better performing schools. You are comparing funding in different districts, which are run independently of each other rather than schools within the same district.
    ”People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both.” --- Ben Franklin

    Quote Originally Posted by The German View Post
    Sterotypes are mostly based on truths.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    Right, with far more schools, some of which perform better than others. Those underperforming schools, within that district, receive higher funding than the better performing schools. You are comparing funding in different districts, which are run independently of each other rather than schools within the same district.

    Proof please.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth View Post
    Most public schools are funded by local property taxes. When the local residents are rich, property values are higher and the locals approve higher taxes to improve the schools, the schools receive more money. When the residents are poor, property values lower, the population density higher and the locals don't support (or can't afford) higher taxes to improve the schools, the schools receive less money. That is one of the major problems with public education and it is one that few people want to address; the schools in low income areas have the most challenging student, yet they are underfunded and can not attract the best teachers because the pay is lower and the work more difficult. Vouchers do not address that fundamental problem, they will make it worse by taking more money from already underfunded and over burdened schools and give it to the best funded schools with the easiest students and most supportive parents.
    Property tax is not the sole source of income for schools. Many inner city schools in low income districts receive state and federal funding.
    ”People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both.” --- Ben Franklin

    Quote Originally Posted by The German View Post
    Sterotypes are mostly based on truths.

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    Re: Do you support school choice?

    Quote Originally Posted by rabbitcaebannog View Post
    Proof please.
    Look at their budget. It states that the "alternative high school" which is a votec, is their number one budget priority. Other than that, they don't list expenditures by individual schools within the district. At least, not with a superficial search.
    ”People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both.” --- Ben Franklin

    Quote Originally Posted by The German View Post
    Sterotypes are mostly based on truths.

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