View Poll Results: Do you think cars should have built-in electronic speed limit

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  • Yes, all cars ecxept "special" ones (police, swat, etc.)

    14 12.07%
  • No

    93 80.17%
  • I don't know

    2 1.72%
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Thread: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

  1. #181
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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad_Captandum View Post
    What's the difference?
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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canell View Post
    OK, fellas, here is the issue: after having a speed limit of, let's say 80 mph, why are cars made to drive up to 140-200 mph? Obviously it would be illegal to drive beyond the speed limit.

    Question: Do you think cars should have built-in electronic speed limit, i.e. the computer limits the speed of the car to what is legal to drive?

    No doubt this could save thousands of lives annually and will prevent criminals from escaping the police (if we presume police cars will not have that electronic speed limit).
    What do you think?
    Please keep in mind the law states that a car traveling over the speed that is safe do do at the time is speeding.

    For example early in the morning when it is foggy, going 20 in a 40 zone is illegal because you can't see 10 feet in front of the car.

    Is the car going to take into account atmospheric conditions to limit the speed of the car?

    if it doesn't, what good is the system?

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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hatuey View Post
    I think a dent to the problem would be made by creating cars that would decelerate the vehicle once it enters something like a school zone. GPS would detect a vehicle entering a low speed zone and simultaneously slow the vehicle down to the correct speed. It's a start that doesn't require tinkering with laws or zoning changes and would still leave room for drivers to drive as fast they want on highways etc. I don't think it would be too much of a hassle to link the GPS to the car's accelerator with more and more functions in cars becoming computerized. It would be avoidable by buying an older car, but that's more than unlikely. If cars have taught us anything is that people will buy them regardless of how much safety is stuffed into them.
    So what if the car behind you doesn't have that system or if it is 12 midnight.

    It is only a school zone when students are present. Will every car be able to detect when the students are present and when they are not?

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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by DA60 View Post
    What you are talking about is the top of a probably very slippery slope.

    So they force you to slow down for school zones? What's next? Hospitals, parks, retirement homes, residential neighbourhoods, etc..

    One nationally advertised death at any of these other areas of someone helpless and the call will go out for mandating cars to slow down in these zones.

    And what about time of day?

    So every time at 11 p.m. I pass a school zone I have to slow down?

    And what if there is a malfunction and the car does not slow down BUT the driver assumes it does because it always has before and goes plowing into some kids?


    Just put a speed bump in those areas.

    They have them where I live and - trust me - you slow down going through those areas.
    I am sure they would add churches into that as if it was a school when they should be treated just as any other business out there.

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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    I think there are too many problems with the concept to be practical, and many of them have been pointed out already. "Safe speed" is just far too dynamic, and overautomation leads to complacency. (we're starting to see problems with this in the aviation industry)

    A simple governor that just caps driving speed at 80 mph or something might work, but I'm not convinced this would appreciably add to highway safety.
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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by DA60 View Post
    Outside of city limits - fine with me.

    Much of the German autobahn's have no speed limits and their death per mile driven is much lower then American highway's.

    Speed does not kill - bad driving does.

    You can kill someone walking through a crosswalk at 10-20 miles an hour.
    If speed does not cause accidents, why would you need a speed limit inside city limits?
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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tetelestai View Post
    I don't agree with him/ her, but, here in the US we are set up as individual sovereign states. The federal government is supposed to have limited power over the states. It's almost like we are 50 separate countries under one flag. kind of like the European Union. But the power of our nation is invested in state rule, even though our present admin is trying to override that.
    We got rid of the Articles for a reason; fought that one little war for a reason...
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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    There are exactly zero legitimate reasons for any civilian driver anywhere to go faster than 90. At most, that is how fast their cars should be able to go.
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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Helix View Post
    auto enthusiast Helix : my Cooper already does have a top speed : 140 MPH. if you limit me to 80 MPH, i will subversively find a way to disconnect the device.

    pragmatist, adult Helix : we'd be a lot better off if cars just drove themselves and were controlled by a central travel computer. example : next time you're stuck at a stoplight, watch how inefficient it is. drivers only take their foot off of the brake when the car in front of them does. imagine how much time would be saved if every car started moving forward the second the light turned green. i think that we're heading in this direction. we also need a lot more public transportation.

    summary of the double Helix :

    Attachment 67160758
    Most cars have built in speed limiters, though tend now to be on the high side. Due to how modern cars are so computer managed if the manufacturer wants it to not be deleted it is impossible to do without spending astronomical amounts of money as the computer runs the fuel injection, transmission, throttle, air-fuel mixture, brakes, suspension etc. If the computer detected an error it shuts the car down. I had a Jaguar XKR (supercharged XKE) and got rid of it for how extreme the computer controls are.

    In 2005 Mercedes decided to respond to earning an reputation that their cars were too heavy and too low on power by producing a 1000 horsepower, 1000 ft/pound torque rocketship they also shaved 1000 pounds off via titanium, carbon fiber and aluminum, that met EPA standards, still got 20 mpg and with a quiet exhaust - then downtuned it to 604 horsepower and 738 ft/pounds torque - out of 6 liter motor (385 CID). At the time, it was the most powerful production motor ever made, was very expensive and didn't sell well, for which after making 194 it was discontinued as a money loser. Reviewers loved the car for being eccentric for the radical power in a luxury 2+2, plus also explained the power was beyond what could be used.

    As of 2007, every major manufacturer had the ability to get 1000 horsepower and 1000 ft/pounds torque out of 6-liter range motors. But mega torque and horsepower creates mega design and components issues, plus warranty and very challenging safety issues from handling to tires to cornering to brakes. GM could produce 1500 horsepower Co5vettes if they wanted to. Ford could do the same with Cobras and Chyrsler the same with Challengers.

    The old 60s to 1971 muscle cars could put out a lot of horsepower, but didn't have overdrive and tended to have "drag packs" (low rear rears) limiting their top speed to around 120. The famous drag-pack 426 Hemi had a redline top speed of 114 mph due to the low rear gearing. Cars of that era didn't come close to having the aerodynamics, brakes and suspension for ubber fast speeds.

    Manufacturers are increasingly putting in computer limiters while at the same time upping horsepower and torque potential, so their advertisement tend to be deceptive as are the speedometers. If the computers are "unlocked" they will realize their true horsepower and moreso torque (they mostly limit torque to protect components and to stay within traction control abilities). However, they are making it increasingly difficult to unlock them for actual driving. For example, few now allow you to actually drive the car while the motor is in "dyno mode" - which is maximum power output. 95% of cars are top speed limited - even super cars. However, for super cars that is due to tire safety and aerodynamic stability safety reasons - not power reasons.

    Back in the Jimmy Carter era, federal law required speedometers not go past 85 - though the cars could. It has a TERRIBLE effect on car sales and was absurd. However, in that era most cars also were computer limited to about 100 mph. Buyers would be pissed to learn their big motor car couldn't go over 97 mph.

    The latest thing of manufacturers who want cars dealer serviced is to have the computers monitoring servicing. While that use to make for warning lights coming on that only the dealer could reset, now it also starts depowering the car and even limiting the transmission. If too much so, it may only allow you reverse and 2nd gear so you can "limp mode" home.

    That is annoying but maybe needed at some level. Annoying for sure as you have to pay the dealer whatever they want whether it needs it or not. The Merc we have was starting to depower based upon time passage from the prior servicing - although not driven 100 miles. On the other hand, the non-super exotic super speed cars are increasingly affordable on the used market. A person can now buy a used high mileage 185 mph Mercedes for under $20,000. Even less if the interior bad, lots of miles on it, bad interior and paint etc - but still 185 mph capable. To put it into perspective, at 185 mph a car is traveling the distance of a football field in 1 second. But while the motor can take the car that fast, it can't do it on its tires and WILL wipe out and that 5000 missile would take out everything in it's path.

    I think cars should be top speed limited by manufacturers to the maximum speed the car is capable of being safely operated at - meaning limited on speed for the design capabilities. The car in the picture above for its aerodynamics, suspension and brakes is good for maybe 130 mph. Beyond that, it can not be driven safely as it would become aerodynamically unstable (car shapes are basically a lifting-wing), nor are the brakes good for anymore. Product-liability lawsuits now see that standard of speed limited to design abilities happens by the manufacturers.

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    Re: Should cars have built-in speed limit?

    An example is the Bugatti Veyron. It will go 256 mph. But computer limited to 216. IF you want to go 250, you have to completely stop the car and enter a code. The computers checkout the car. Has it been serviced? How many miles on the tires? Brakes ok? The computer will only allow two 250 mile runs between tire replacement - which costs $70,000 a set. IF the computer approves of the 250 mph run, it drops down the rear wing to eliminate aerodynamic drag and drops the whole car down about 2 inches to stop air piling up under it. Then and only then can you take the Veyron to the maximum speed.

    All supercars now have such systems, and the ZR1/ZO6 and other of the new mega-cars have similar, though more passive automatic limiters they don't tell you about. The car potentially may have 600, 700, 800 hp and maybe a potential 800 ft/pounds torque or more, and may have the potential to go 200 mph. That doesn't mean the car's computer is going to allow you to really have those traits in operation. And it is no easy trick to get around those limiters. It is taking 3 companies to get them off my Merc. and it is not cheap. Then again, it is all eccentric as there is absolutely no way to use the must power under 80 or 90 mph.

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