View Poll Results: What are your initial thoughts on the Verizon v. FCC decision?

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22. You may not vote on this poll
  • I agree with the decision, but there will be no negative impact.

    0 0%
  • I agree with the decision, but think it will have a negative impact.

    1 4.55%
  • I disagree with the decision, but don't think there'll be a negative impact.

    2 9.09%
  • I disagree with the decision, but do think it will have a negative impact.

    19 86.36%
  • I have dial-up internet and don't care either way.

    0 0%
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Thread: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

  1. #41
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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by rathi View Post
    You have no idea what you are talking about. Netflix pays for their bandwidth on their servers. I pay for my bandwidth to my machine. That price is expensive and includes all incidental costs needed to transport said data. Everyone is paying for what they use.
    Besides which, unless you control the prices that Netflix charges as well, it's for damn sure they'll pass any increased costs on to their customers.
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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by lizzie View Post
    Large corporations don't have legislative powers. What I have seen in my area is an increase in available services, with more competitive pricing, not a decrease from large corporations squeezing out the competition.
    The US ranks a lowly 31st in the world's consumer download speeds.

    US download speeds sluggish compared with other countries | Internet & Media - CNET News

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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    The US ranks a lowly 31st in the world's consumer download speeds.

    US download speeds sluggish compared with other countries | Internet & Media - CNET News
    Thing is, many of those countries are much smaller, area-wise, than the US.

    Also factor in our large rural areas (as opposed to, say....Hong Kong?).

    It's not a very valid comparison, IMO.
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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by The Mark View Post
    Thing is, many of those countries are much smaller, area-wise, than the US.

    Also factor in our large rural areas (as opposed to, say....Hong Kong?).

    It's not a very valid comparison, IMO.

    It's plenty valid when you consider that a decade ago, the United States was #1 on that list.

    Clearly, our method of providing broadband to consumers is flawed.

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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    It's plenty valid when you consider that a decade ago, the United States was #1 on that list.

    Clearly, our method of providing broadband to consumers is flawed.
    Part of that is probably how ahead we were a decade ago. they had to do less to catch up.

    However, I would agree that in many cases our infrastructure is lacking.

    For example, I think overhead lines, for both power and communications, are a bit behind the times (unless I misunderstand) - yet we keep repairing them after some random wind/snow/ice storm knocks them down. I suppose in most cases repair is cheaper than replacement with underground lines, but...
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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by The Mark View Post
    Part of that is probably how ahead we were a decade ago. they had to do less to catch up.

    However, I would agree that in many cases our infrastructure is lacking.

    For example, I think overhead lines, for both power and communications, are a bit behind the times (unless I misunderstand) - yet we keep repairing them after some random wind/snow/ice storm knocks them down. I suppose in most cases repair is cheaper than replacement with underground lines, but...

    I'm not at all impressed with American broadband options.

    I live in downtown Dallas, which is the 4th largest metro area in the country. The only broadband offered in my area is Time Warner Cable and ATT's DSL.

    I have Time Warner's premium package, and I just speed tested at 15.89 mbps.

    According to the chart, folks in my native Sweden are downloading over twice as fast at 42.35 mbps, and that is quite a rural country as well.

    Not impressed in the least. In addition, ours is the most expensive. What exactly are we paying for?

    It's like the 80's all over again with the cars, remember how terrible American cars were? American broadband is a 1984 Dodge Monaco.

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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    I'm not at all impressed with American broadband options.

    I live in downtown Dallas, which is the 4th largest metro area in the country. The only broadband offered in my area is Time Warner Cable and ATT's DSL.

    I have Time Warner's premium package, and I just speed tested at 15.89 mbps.

    According to the chart, folks in my native Sweden are downloading over twice as fast at 42.35 mbps, and that is quite a rural country as well.

    Not impressed in the least. In addition, ours is the most expensive. What exactly are we paying for?

    It's like the 80's all over again with the cars, remember how terrible American cars were? American broadband is a 1984 Dodge Monaco.
    As I understand it, one of the main reasons for higher speeds in other countries is government spending on internet infrastructure. National government spending, in many cases.

    Whereas, at best, here in the US the only governmental support of internet infrastructure might be on a state level, and probably only local (as in, a city).

    Not just internet infrastructure, but also power infrastructure, I think...
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  8. #48
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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by The Mark View Post
    Thing is, many of those countries are much smaller, area-wise, than the US.

    Also factor in our large rural areas (as opposed to, say....Hong Kong?).

    It's not a very valid comparison, IMO.
    The "rural area" excuse doesn't work because even the most densely populated areas in the nation still have crappy broadband speeds. Meanwhile, Sweden has a tiny population and screamingly fast internet. Our current ISPs are utterly pathetic.

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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by rathi View Post
    The "rural area" excuse doesn't work because even the most densely populated areas in the nation still have crappy broadband speeds. Meanwhile, Sweden has a tiny population and screamingly fast internet. Our current ISPs are utterly pathetic.
    Small population probably makes it easier to provide excellent service.

    I'm not saying we have good service, just that it's likely not as easy to fix as you might think.
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  10. #50
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    Re: Verizon v. FCC (Net Neutrality/ Internet Openness)

    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius46 View Post
    Yes. And my point is - and has always been - that that is a sledgehammer approach. Everyone pays regardless of whether they use the bandwidth or not. Billing Netflix directly would be a step towards shifting the cost to those who actually incur them.
    A lot of ISPs already charge their customers by download amount per month, which is as it should be. Charging Netflix or Hulu or YouTube for the same download is ludicrous and price gouging.

    A better solution would be for the CTV companies to adopt a better business model. If Netflix et al is stealing their business then maybe they should adapt as a CTV company instead of using their position as an ISP to cover their failure by raping their Internet customers.
    Last edited by MoSurveyor; 01-17-14 at 01:55 AM.
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