View Poll Results: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of America?

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  • Very Optimistic

    24 17.27%
  • Somewhat Optimistic

    29 20.86%
  • Dunno

    11 7.91%
  • Somewhat Pessimistic

    47 33.81%
  • Very Pessimistic

    28 20.14%
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Thread: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of America?

  1. #21
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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by iliveonramen View Post
    Very Optimistic.

    If you were to go through a list of the greatest trials facing the US in it's history current times are actually pretty damn good. People have a tendency to hear bad news and not put it into context. Look at the late 70's early 80's. Pessimism reigned but right around the corner was massive economic expansion and relative peace in the US.
    At that time, and earlier, Americans tended to be responsible adults but now near half of them are dependent on government handouts. They had 'gumption' and the 'can do' spirit then, now rather old fashioned concepts.

    The Americans of today are not the Americans of yesterday, and that makes me quite pessimistic.

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by Helix View Post
    if we're smart, we'll go back to being a country. empires that do that sometimes end up ok.
    I don't know; Britain and France have turned out great, and that was largely because of their empires.

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad_Captandum View Post
    I don't know; Britain and France have turned out great, and that was largely because of their empires.
    i would argue that it's because they largely abandoned the empire model.

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by Helix View Post
    i would argue that it's because they largely abandoned the empire model.
    Well, I think you're partially right. I think it's probably more accurate to say that Britain and France are so nice now because they successfully ran their empires for so long.

    Essentially, they conquered half the world, spent plenty of time, energy and human capital securing their dominions. Then the time came to give it all up (World War II, namely), and they instead turned their huge resources to turning their countries into paradises.

    I think a fundamental part of the establishment of no-crime, prosperous, welfare Britain was the empire period that launched the civilisation to greatness. Albania, for example, never had a major empire to spur its cultural and human development, and so never underwent this evolution or transformation from superpower to super-nice place to live.

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ad_Captandum View Post
    Well, I think you're partially right. I think it's probably more accurate to say that Britain and France are so nice now because they successfully ran their empires for so long.

    Essentially, they conquered half the world, spent plenty of time, energy and human capital securing their dominions. Then the time came to give it all up (World War II, namely), and they instead turned their huge resources to turning their countries into paradises.

    I think a fundamental part of the establishment of no-crime, prosperous, welfare Britain was the empire period that launched the civilisation to greatness. Albania, for example, never had a major empire to spur its cultural and human development, and so never underwent this evolution or transformation from superpower to super-nice place to live.
    this is a compelling argument. but along those same lines, don't you also think that we have already reached and passed the apex of maximum benefit when it comes to our own empirical aspirations?

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    John Carpenters The Thing 1982 best version so far IMHO

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by Capster78 View Post
    I think feminism has done irreputable damage. It has destroyed the family and destabalized society. I think we will be in for a rude awakening within the next 2 generations.
    Feminism and socialist liberalism.

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    1) What would you think of a person who earned $24,000 a year but spent $35,000? Suppose on top of that, he was already $170,000 in debt. You'd tell him to get his act together -- stop spending so much or he'd destroy his family, impoverish his kids and wreck their future. Of course, no individual could live so irresponsibly for long. But tack on eight more zeroes to that budget and you have the checkbook for our out-of-control, big-spending federal government. -- John Stossel

    2) John Kitchen of the U.S. Treasury and Menzie Chinn of the University of Wisconsin published a study in 2010 entitled:

    Financing U.S. Debt: Is There Enough Money in the World -- and At What Cost?

    The fact that sane men are even asking this question ought to be deeply disturbing. As to the answer, foreign official holdings of U.S. Treasury securities have usually been less than 5 percent of the rest of the world's GDP. By 2009, they were up to 7 percent. By 2020, Kitchen and Chinn project them to rise to 19 percent of the rest of the world's GDP, which they say is....do-able. Whether the rest of the world will want to do it is another matter. A future that presumes the rest of the planet will sink a fifth of its GDP into U.S. Treasuries is no future at all. But on Big Government's streetcar named Desire we have come to depend on the kindness of strangers. -- Mark Steyn

    3) The Federal Reserve is propping up the entire U.S. economy by buying 61 percent of the government debt issued by the Treasury Department, a trend that cannot last, Lawrence Goodman, a former Treasury official and current president of the Center for Financial Stability, writes in a Wall Street Journal opinion article published Wednesday. -- Newsmax

    4) In fact, in 2006, the Census Bureau found only 2.2 million households earning more than $250,000. And most of those are closer to the Lubbock city manager than to Carlos Slim, income-wise. To jump from the 50th to the 51st percentile isn’t that tough; jumping from the 96th to the 97th takes a lot of schmundo. It’s lonely at the top.

    But say we wanted to balance the budget by jacking up taxes on Club 250K. That’s a problem: The 2012 deficit is forecast to hit $1.1 trillion under Obama’s budget. (Thanks, Mr. President!) Spread that deficit over all the households in Club 250K and you have to jack up their taxes by an average of $500,000 -- which you simply can’t do, since a lot of them don’t have $500,000 in income to seize. Most of them are making $250,000 to $450,000 and paying about half in taxes already. You can squeeze that goose all day, but that’s not going to make it push out a golden egg.
    Kevin Williamson

    5) Within a decade, the United States will be spending more of the federal budget on its interest payments than on its military. You read that right: more on debt service than on the armed services. According to the CBO's 2010 long-term budget outlook, by 2020 the government will be paying between 15 and 20 percent of its revenues in debt interest. Whereas defense spending will be down between 14 and 16 percent. -- Mark Steyn

    6) (In Pennsylvania, a) single mom is better off earning gross income of $29,000 with $57,327 in net income & benefits than to earn gross income of $69,000 with net income and benefits of $57,045." -- From Gary Alexander, Secretary of Public Welfare, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

    7) For every 1.65 employed persons in the private sector, 1 person receives welfare assistance. For every 1.25 employed persons in the private sector, 1 person receives welfare assistance or works for the government. ...The punchline: 110 million privately employed workers; 88 million welfare recipients and government workers and rising rapidly. -- Tyler Durden

    8) My name’s Ronnie Bryant, and I’m a mine operator…. I’ve been issued a [state] permit in the recent past for [waste water] discharge, and after standing in this room today listening to the comments being made by the people…. [pause] Nearly every day without fail — I have a different perspective — men stream to these [mining] operations looking for work in Walker County. They can’t pay their mortgage. They can’t pay their car note. They can’t feed their families. They don’t have health insurance. And as I stand here today, I just … you know … what’s the use? I got a permit to open up an underground coal mine that would employ probably 125 people. They’d be paid wages from $50,000 to $150,000 a year. We would consume probably $50 million to $60 million in consumables a year, putting more men to work. And my only idea today is to go home. What’s the use? I don’t know. I mean, I see these guys — I see them with tears in their eyes — looking for work. And if there’s so much opposition to these guys making a living, I feel like there’s no need in me putting out the effort to provide work for them. So as I stood against the wall here today, basically what I’ve decided is not to open the mine. I’m just quitting. Thank you. -- Ronnie Bryant

    9) Wyatt Emerich of The Cleveland Current analyzes disposable income and economic benefits among several key income classes and comes to the stunning (and verifiable) conclusion that "a one-parent family of three making $14,500 a year (minimum wage) has more disposable income than a family making $60,000 a year.

    10) The typical husband and wife who reach age 66 and qualify for Social Security -- Starting next year, this typical couple, receiving the average benefit, will begin collecting a combination of cash and health-care entitlement benefits that will total $1 million over their remaining expected lifetime.

    According to my calculations based on government data, such married couples will begin receiving monthly Social Security checks that will, on average, total about $550,000 after inflation. They will receive health-care services paid for by Medicare that, on average, will total another $450,000 after inflation. The benefactors will be a generation of younger workers who are trying to support themselves and their families while paying taxes to finance the rest of government spending.

    ...Medicare premiums paid by senior citizens once covered half of the cost of physician and related services. They now cover one-fourth. Copayments once covered nearly 40% of these services’ costs. They now cover only 20%. -- Joe Cogan

    11) The CBO numbers foresee net interest payments rising from 9 percent of revenue to 36 percent in 2030, then to 58 percent in 2040, and up to 85 percent in 2050. If that trajectory holds, we'll be spending more than the planet's entire military budget on debt interest. But forget mid-century because, unless something changes, whatever goes by the name of "America" under those conditions isn't worth talking about. -- Mark Steyn

    12) The total present value of payments expected under Social Security and Medicare beyond what is expected to be collected under current tax laws is about $100 trillion. One way to put that amount of money in context is to note that it is about twice the amount of all the net private assets that exist in America today. To answer cw’s question directly, the best back-of-envelope estimate is that meeting this unfunded portion of our Social Security and Medicare commitments would require roughly an immediate 80 percent increase in federal income taxes, sustained forever. — Jim Manzi

    13) The total fiscal overhang of our federal, state, and local governments — their combined debt and unfunded liabilities — is around $140 trillion, and growing. That is about twice the annual economic output of human civilization, and nearly the value of all the financial assets in the world. It is something close to a mathematical certainty that those debts and obligations will not be made good on at their present value. -- Kevin Williamson

  9. #29
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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    Quote Originally Posted by EdwinWillers View Post
    Many factors affect one's outlook about various things - history, current events, politics, religion, media, family & friends, personal character traits, life experiences, environment, upbringing, education, etc. etc. etc.

    Just curious. Nothing ulterior, just curiosity.

    What is your outlook re the future of the United States of America - and maybe why?

    Very Optimistic
    Somewhat Optimistic
    Dunno
    Somewhat Pessimistic
    Very Pessimistic
    I'm very bullish on America for one simple reason - Obama has about 3 years left, there's light at the end of the tunnel, and as the day of America's rebirth gets closer, American business and those who invest in America will be exploding with optimism and activity.
    "Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views." William F. Buckley Jr.

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    Re: What is your level of optimism concerning the future of the United States of Amer

    We (The United States) created our "modern" infrastructure first, and therefore it is the oldest modern infrastructure in the world. It is crumbling. The things we do build and fix today, we build them only to last short term.
    We are falling behind the entire world with our infrastructure to the point that many 3rd world Nations have aspects that are greater than our own.

    Our education is falling behind the rest of the world with almost every 3rd world Asian Nation coming in ahead of us.
    Instead of making improvements we are falling farther behind each year. Instead of teaching our children modern science, we are letting right wing fanatics stop our children from learning.

    We do have some of the best medical care in the world for our rich. But for our poor, our medical care ranks among the worst on the planet with Nations like Cuba putting us to shame.
    For our average citizen, lifespan and other medical stats are lagging behind the rest of the world. We continue to put the most money into it and get the least for our dollar.

    Our politics has become completely dishonest. Most everything that comes out of the Right Wing is a complete deception. Non stop fake scandals and untruths are pumped out with unity.
    Our Right Wing is completely fanatical and bent on our destruction, yet our Left Wing, if left unchecked, will swing too far left and create damage almost as severe.

    I could come up with a lot more topics but am out of time.
    Our future is bleak at best.

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