View Poll Results: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

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    27 52.94%
  • Yes

    24 47.06%
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Thread: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

  1. #21
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by Constantine View Post
    I don't think so. America would have to conqueror lands in order to become that. America really hasn't conquered any lands. Even when the Native Americans we're forced out America was still a British Colony. If we took over Mexico...then perhaps we could be called a empire. Speaking of which...that might actually improve those nations...kind of a sad thought there.
    Well, look who's here - emperor Constantine! Just kidding, pall.
    Now, definitions are conditional. I'd rather look at the essence.

  2. #22
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    First, I have a question: What countries does the USA totally control besides the USA?

  3. #23
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by Muhammed View Post
    I voted no, but I would like to point out that the US has some very expansionist and monarchical tendencies, especially when under the Democratic party's control.



    Since you have said what you have said I would like to point out that you are full of it.
    Last edited by shrubnose; 11-13-13 at 02:34 PM.

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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    No, it isn't.

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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by shrubnose View Post
    First, I have a question: What countries does the USA totally control besides the USA?
    The Holy Roman Empire lasted 844 years. I don't think the Emperor was in total control all the time. In fact:

    The power of the emperor was limited, and while the various princes, lords and kings of the Empire were vassals and subjects who owed the emperor their allegiance, they also possessed an extent of privileges that gave them de facto sovereignty within their territories.

    Source: Wikipedia
    Last edited by Canell; 11-13-13 at 02:47 PM.

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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canell View Post
    The Holy Roman Empire lasted 844 years. I don't think the Emperor was in total control all the time. In fact:
    The HRE was neither holy or roman either. So it's a triple lie!

    Just kiding.

    It was holy because the emperor was crowned by the Pope.
    It was Roman because the Emperor called himself Kaiser which is a germanization of the word Caesar.
    And it was an Empire because the Emperor, while being absolute monarch of a single state, had the power to legislate and command many nations outside of his own in many respects, that is, the member nations of the HRE.


    The Romans had client states too... Egypt was subservient to Rome for a long time even though no roman governor was present all the time... but it was under Rome. Judeea was allowed to have jewish elites like the pharisees but nobody denied that Rome wasn't ruler there. So yeah... examples can continue.

  7. #27
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Not a traditional technical empire but it is an empire. We control many overseas lands such as Jamaica and American Somoa not to mention many other small islands.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have pooped in public, even in public neighborhoods.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatGuy View Post
    Usually a gag for wise mouthed insulting little girls. Then some good nylon rope so I can tie them up, toss them in the trunk of my car and forget about them.

  8. #28
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by shrubnose View Post
    First, I have a question: What countries does the USA totally control besides the USA?
    Classification of current U.S. territories

    Incorporated unorganized territories
    Palmyra Atoll is privately owned by the Nature Conservancy and administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior. It is an archipelago of about 50 small islands about 1.56 square miles (4 km²) in area that lies about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) south of Honolulu. The atoll was acquired by the United States in the 1898 annexation of the Republic of Hawaii. When the Territory of Hawaii was incorporated on April 30, 1900, Palmyra Atoll was incorporated as part of that territory. However, when Hawaii became a state in 1959, Palmyra Atoll was explicitly separated from the state, remaining an incorporated territory but receiving no new organized government.

    Unincorporated organized territories
    Guam
    Northern Mariana Islands (commonwealth)
    Puerto Rico (commonwealth)
    United States Virgin Islands

    Unincorporated unorganized territories
    American Samoa, technically unorganized, but self-governing under a constitution last revised in 1967
    Baker Island, uninhabited
    Howland Island, uninhabited
    Jarvis Island, uninhabited
    Johnston Atoll, uninhabited
    Kingman Reef, uninhabited
    Petrel Islands, uninhabited
    Serranilla Bank, uninhabited
    Midway Islands, no indigenous inhabitants, currently included in the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
    Navassa Island, uninhabited (claimed by Haiti)
    Wake Atoll consisting of Peale, Wake and Wilkes Islands[4], no indigenous inhabitants, only contractor personnel (claimed by the Marshall Islands)

    Classification of former U.S. territories & administered areas

    Former unincorporated territories of the United States
    Line Islands (?–1979): Disputed claim with United Kingdom, all U.S. claims ceded to Kiribati upon its independence.
    Panama Canal Zone (1903–1999): sovereignty returned to Panama under the Torrijos-Carter Treaties; the U.S. retains a military interest
    Corn Islands (1914-1971): leased for 99 years under the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty but were returned after the abrogation of the treaty in 1970.
    Roncador Bank (1856-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Quita Sueño Bank (1869-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Serrana Bank (?-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Philippine Islands (1902–1935); Commonwealth of the Philippines (1935–1946): Full independence in 1946.
    Phoenix Islands (?–1979): Disputed claim with United Kingdom, all U.S. claims ceded to Kiribati upon its independence.

    Former unincorporated territories of the United States under military government
    Puerto Rico (April 11, 1899-May 1, 1900): civil government operations began
    Philippines (April 11, 1899-July 4, 1901): civil government operations began
    Cuba (April 11, 1899-May 20, 1902): sovereignty granted as Republic of Cuba
    Guam (April 11, 1899-July 1, 1950): civil government operations began

    Areas formerly administered by the United States
    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (1947–1986): included the Compact of Free Association nations (Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, and Palau) and the Northern Mariana Islands
    Ryukyu Islands (1952–1972): returned to Japanese control, included some other minor islands under the Agreement Between the United States of America and Japan Concerning the Ryukyu Islands and the Daito Islands.[5]

    Other zones
    Austria and Vienna (1945–1955)
    Berlin (1945–1990)
    Germany (1945–1949)
    Guantánamo Bay (1903-) Nominal Cuban sovereignty, de facto sole US control.
    Japan (1945–1952)
    Rhineland (1918–1921?)
    South Korea (1945–1948)
    Iraq (March 20, 2003–June 28, 2004)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territo..._United_States

    We have an economic and military imperialist country.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have pooped in public, even in public neighborhoods.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatGuy View Post
    Usually a gag for wise mouthed insulting little girls. Then some good nylon rope so I can tie them up, toss them in the trunk of my car and forget about them.

  9. #29
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Basten View Post
    No. We don't have colonies across the globe and haven't made sport of conquering far away land rampantly like the Romans.
    em•pire (ěm'pīr') Pronunciation Key
    1.
    a. A political unit having an extensive territory or comprising a number of territories or nations and ruled by a single supreme authority. (THE USA)
    b. The territory included in such a unit.
    2. An extensive enterprise under a unified authority: a publishing empire.
    3. Imperial or imperialistic sovereignty, domination, or control: "There is a growing sense that the course of empire is shifting toward the . . . Asians" (James Traub).

    em•pire
    –noun
    1. a group of nations or peoples ruled over by an emperor, empress, or other powerful sovereign or government: usually a territory of greater extent than a kingdom, as the former British Empire, French Empire, Russian Empire, Byzantine Empire, or Roman Empire.

    Empire | Define Empire at Dictionary.com


    Classification of current U.S. territories

    Incorporated unorganized territories
    Palmyra Atoll is privately owned by the Nature Conservancy and administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior. It is an archipelago of about 50 small islands about 1.56 square miles (4 km²) in area that lies about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) south of Honolulu. The atoll was acquired by the United States in the 1898 annexation of the Republic of Hawaii. When the Territory of Hawaii was incorporated on April 30, 1900, Palmyra Atoll was incorporated as part of that territory. However, when Hawaii became a state in 1959, Palmyra Atoll was explicitly separated from the state, remaining an incorporated territory but receiving no new organized government.

    Unincorporated organized territories
    Guam
    Northern Mariana Islands (commonwealth)
    Puerto Rico (commonwealth)
    United States Virgin Islands

    Unincorporated unorganized territories
    American Samoa, technically unorganized, but self-governing under a constitution last revised in 1967
    Baker Island, uninhabited
    Howland Island, uninhabited
    Jarvis Island, uninhabited
    Johnston Atoll, uninhabited
    Kingman Reef, uninhabited
    Petrel Islands, uninhabited
    Serranilla Bank, uninhabited
    Midway Islands, no indigenous inhabitants, currently included in the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
    Navassa Island, uninhabited (claimed by Haiti)
    Wake Atoll consisting of Peale, Wake and Wilkes Islands[4], no indigenous inhabitants, only contractor personnel (claimed by the Marshall Islands)

    Classification of former U.S. territories & administered areas

    Former unincorporated territories of the United States
    Line Islands (?–1979): Disputed claim with United Kingdom, all U.S. claims ceded to Kiribati upon its independence.
    Panama Canal Zone (1903–1999): sovereignty returned to Panama under the Torrijos-Carter Treaties; the U.S. retains a military interest
    Corn Islands (1914-1971): leased for 99 years under the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty but were returned after the abrogation of the treaty in 1970.
    Roncador Bank (1856-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Quita Sueño Bank (1869-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Serrana Bank (?-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Philippine Islands (1902–1935); Commonwealth of the Philippines (1935–1946): Full independence in 1946.
    Phoenix Islands (?–1979): Disputed claim with United Kingdom, all U.S. claims ceded to Kiribati upon its independence.

    Former unincorporated territories of the United States under military government
    Puerto Rico (April 11, 1899-May 1, 1900): civil government operations began
    Philippines (April 11, 1899-July 4, 1901): civil government operations began
    Cuba (April 11, 1899-May 20, 1902): sovereignty granted as Republic of Cuba
    Guam (April 11, 1899-July 1, 1950): civil government operations began

    Areas formerly administered by the United States
    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (1947–1986): included the Compact of Free Association nations (Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, and Palau) and the Northern Mariana Islands
    Ryukyu Islands (1952–1972): returned to Japanese control, included some other minor islands under the Agreement Between the United States of America and Japan Concerning the Ryukyu Islands and the Daito Islands.[5]

    Other zones
    Austria and Vienna (1945–1955)
    Berlin (1945–1990)
    Germany (1945–1949)
    Guantánamo Bay (1903-) Nominal Cuban sovereignty, de facto sole US control.
    Japan (1945–1952)
    Rhineland (1918–1921?)
    South Korea (1945–1948)
    Iraq (March 20, 2003–June 28, 2004)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territo..._United_States

    We have an economic and military imperialist country.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have pooped in public, even in public neighborhoods.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatGuy View Post
    Usually a gag for wise mouthed insulting little girls. Then some good nylon rope so I can tie them up, toss them in the trunk of my car and forget about them.

  10. #30
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    Re: Is the U.S.A. de facto an empire?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bodhisattva View Post
    Classification of current U.S. territories

    Incorporated unorganized territories
    Palmyra Atoll is privately owned by the Nature Conservancy and administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior. It is an archipelago of about 50 small islands about 1.56 square miles (4 km²) in area that lies about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) south of Honolulu. The atoll was acquired by the United States in the 1898 annexation of the Republic of Hawaii. When the Territory of Hawaii was incorporated on April 30, 1900, Palmyra Atoll was incorporated as part of that territory. However, when Hawaii became a state in 1959, Palmyra Atoll was explicitly separated from the state, remaining an incorporated territory but receiving no new organized government.

    Unincorporated organized territories
    Guam
    Northern Mariana Islands (commonwealth)
    Puerto Rico (commonwealth)
    United States Virgin Islands

    Unincorporated unorganized territories
    American Samoa, technically unorganized, but self-governing under a constitution last revised in 1967
    Baker Island, uninhabited
    Howland Island, uninhabited
    Jarvis Island, uninhabited
    Johnston Atoll, uninhabited
    Kingman Reef, uninhabited
    Petrel Islands, uninhabited
    Serranilla Bank, uninhabited
    Midway Islands, no indigenous inhabitants, currently included in the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
    Navassa Island, uninhabited (claimed by Haiti)
    Wake Atoll consisting of Peale, Wake and Wilkes Islands[4], no indigenous inhabitants, only contractor personnel (claimed by the Marshall Islands)

    Classification of former U.S. territories & administered areas

    Former unincorporated territories of the United States
    Line Islands (?–1979): Disputed claim with United Kingdom, all U.S. claims ceded to Kiribati upon its independence.
    Panama Canal Zone (1903–1999): sovereignty returned to Panama under the Torrijos-Carter Treaties; the U.S. retains a military interest
    Corn Islands (1914-1971): leased for 99 years under the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty but were returned after the abrogation of the treaty in 1970.
    Roncador Bank (1856-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Quita Sueño Bank (1869-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Serrana Bank (?-1981): claimed under Guano Islands Act was ceded to Colombia in September 7, 1981 by treaty.
    Philippine Islands (1902–1935); Commonwealth of the Philippines (1935–1946): Full independence in 1946.
    Phoenix Islands (?–1979): Disputed claim with United Kingdom, all U.S. claims ceded to Kiribati upon its independence.

    Former unincorporated territories of the United States under military government
    Puerto Rico (April 11, 1899-May 1, 1900): civil government operations began
    Philippines (April 11, 1899-July 4, 1901): civil government operations began
    Cuba (April 11, 1899-May 20, 1902): sovereignty granted as Republic of Cuba
    Guam (April 11, 1899-July 1, 1950): civil government operations began

    Areas formerly administered by the United States
    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (1947–1986): included the Compact of Free Association nations (Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, and Palau) and the Northern Mariana Islands
    Ryukyu Islands (1952–1972): returned to Japanese control, included some other minor islands under the Agreement Between the United States of America and Japan Concerning the Ryukyu Islands and the Daito Islands.[5]

    Other zones
    Austria and Vienna (1945–1955)
    Berlin (1945–1990)
    Germany (1945–1949)
    Guantánamo Bay (1903-) Nominal Cuban sovereignty, de facto sole US control.
    Japan (1945–1952)
    Rhineland (1918–1921?)
    South Korea (1945–1948)
    Iraq (March 20, 2003–June 28, 2004)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territo..._United_States

    We have an economic and military imperialist country.



    That's just, like ... your opinion man.

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