View Poll Results: What does disability mean and who should get it?

Voters
36. You may not vote on this poll
  • It means unmanagable pain and those people should get it

    9 25.00%
  • It means one might get a chance to retire early and play

    2 5.56%
  • It is another way to fleece taxpayers and no one should get it

    2 5.56%
  • who cares, it is unmanagable

    0 0%
  • who cares, it is insignificant expenditure for the US

    1 2.78%
  • It should be completely overhauled, re-written, and inspected for cheaters

    26 72.22%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 54 of 58 FirstFirst ... 4445253545556 ... LastLast
Results 531 to 540 of 580

Thread: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

  1. #531
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Seen
    01-22-17 @ 09:27 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    4,136

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by minnie616 View Post
    Well, my husband is one. He is self employed.

    He does however enjoy the use of the roads , the post office service , etc. Our children went to public schools but we also supported all of those Services with the taxes we pay.
    If those were the ONLY services that any government was offering, I would be direhard "pro-government" everyday of the week and twice on Sunday.

  2. #532
    Global Moderator
    Moderator

    Gina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:46 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    31,892

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by JC Callender View Post
    Congressional approval ratings have been very low for a long time: RealClearPolitics - Election Other - Congressional Job Approval

    Charities do have scandals, as I've said before, but the difference between them and the government is that you can chose to give to another charity, but you have no choice with the government.

    As far as your poverty stats, doesn't that prove that the War on Poverty has been a failure? It seems like you're making my point for me. And I live near Detroit, one of the model cities for the War on Poverty. I'm sure you've heard of their problems.

    I think people would help because I see how we come together for things like natural disasters, the events after 9/11, etc... . I think we have a very compassionate nation. I know you're downplaying the effect that Komen has, but a lot of people don't donate to charities because they believe the government is already taking care of it, I mean, who doesn't the Federal government give money too?

    Once again, you're 12% and my 12% may not amount to much, but a wealthy persons 12% sure does. And why couldn't you lead the charge to a great charity if Komen could? As for me, maybe I would. I certainly would if no one else did.
    I shouldn't have even entertained congressional approval ratings. It has little to nothing to do with whether to fund or not people with disabilities.

    Indeed you can choose another charity which is why depending on them to deliver basic services, is foolish.

    We aren't discussing the War on Poverty. We are discussing aid to those with disabilities. You asked me to show you need, so I showed you a need that the private sector is not filling. Let us stick to the topic.

    I think that is a naive position. Aid to those with disabilities doesn't go away unlike the majority of the work that is accomplished in putting lives back together after a disaster. There is no plan for ongoing lifetime funding.

    You are playing up Komen. They raise a lot in comparison to other non-profits, but they can only fund 10-15% of all valuable research requests. 90-85% of requesting researchers have to go find another entity for funding. Often, that's the government. If you read the link to Komen, they grant the most money for breast cancer research, $63 million in 2011 compared to American Cancer society's $17 million for breast cancer research. Obviously they are not filling 90-85% of those unfunded grants. Charity cannot do it all on its own and neither can the government.

    You know, I have never once thought of not donating to something, hello breast cancer research, because the government took care of it. If they are asking, then there is a need to be fulfilled.

    Maybe you would? How would you approach it? What would be your goal in helping people with disabilities? How would you determine if someone was eligible to receive your help and at what level?
    I don't attack my constituents. Bob is my constituent now.
    This is the important stuff. We canít get lost in discrimination. We canít get lost in B.S. We canít get lost tearing each other down. I want to make a point here that no matter what you look like, where you come from, how you worship, who you love, how you identify, and yeah, how you run, that if you have good public policy ideas, if you are well qualified for office, bring those ideas to the table, because this is your America, too. This is our commonwealth of Virginia, too.
    Danica Roem - The nation's first openly transgender person elected to serve in a U.S. state legislature.

  3. #533
    Sewer Rat
    Risky Thicket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Last Seen
    Today @ 08:58 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    23,803

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gina View Post
    I shouldn't have even entertained congressional approval ratings. It has little to nothing to do with whether to fund or not people with disabilities.

    Indeed you can choose another charity which is why depending on them to deliver basic services, is foolish.

    We aren't discussing the War on Poverty. We are discussing aid to those with disabilities. You asked me to show you need, so I showed you a need that the private sector is not filling. Let us stick to the topic.

    I think that is a naive position. Aid to those with disabilities doesn't go away unlike the majority of the work that is accomplished in putting lives back together after a disaster. There is no plan for ongoing lifetime funding.

    You are playing up Komen. They raise a lot in comparison to other non-profits, but they can only fund 10-15% of all valuable research requests. 90-85% of requesting researchers have to go find another entity for funding. Often, that's the government. If you read the link to Komen, they grant the most money for breast cancer research, $63 million in 2011 compared to American Cancer society's $17 million for breast cancer research. Obviously they are not filling 90-85% of those unfunded grants. Charity cannot do it all on its own and neither can the government.

    You know, I have never once thought of not donating to something, hello breast cancer research, because the government took care of it. If they are asking, then there is a need to be fulfilled.

    Maybe you would? How would you approach it? What would be your goal in helping people with disabilities? How would you determine if someone was eligible to receive your help and at what level?
    I'm betting JC has zip experience working for/with charities. His let the other guy do it is likely a position of ignorance.

    Nationally, something JC doesn't seem to know, most local charities are tapped out and have been since 2008. But, let's suppose for a minute they aren't. Where in the world would charities find the diverse expertise to qualify applicants and determine what precisely is needed. JC doesn't know that most physicians don't know how to write prescriptions for assistive technology or DME. And really they shouldn't know. Assistive technology and DME is often post medical.

    The "let other people do it" mentality is often dismissive and almost always a position of ignorance. How will these "other people" working in charities do it? Who will cover them for liability? JC never thought about that? Will one person in a charity be responsible for evaluating, proscribing and training ALS patients with augmentative communication devices? Will that same person provide evaluations, training, etc. eye gaze technology for quads or people who have CP? Will that same person provide the same services for screen readers for people who are blind? Will that same person provide audiological services for people with hearing loss? Of course that person would have to be fluent in ASL as well. Is this same person going to provide workplace evaluations for all of the above and more? Of course this same person working for the charity would also have to have had training in seating and positioning as well. I'm betting JC has no idea that wheelchairs are not at all alike. Improper seating and positioning can cause serious problems. JC's charity person would also need to be able to evaluate the need for and install environmental controls. Not to mention the fact that as with much of the technology environmental controls often need to be engineered per person, per environment. That same person in JC's charity will need to be able to assess a hard of hearing person's work environment to determine what telecommunication device(s) would be required. That would include installing magnetic induction loops, interfacing FM systems with sound boards and making all that compatible with various levels of hearing aid/cochlear implant technology - and training staff and hard of hearing people how to use the technology.

    JC's charity person will have to be able to trouble shoot untold issues such as figuring out how to get an employed person in a motorized wheelchair who have limited range of motion to the 11th floor of a building when that person cannot reach the elevator buttons.

    Of course one person could not do all of the above by a long shot. It requires many specialists, trained and educated and current in their knowledge of technology and in disability law as well. How is all that going to be funded by JC's charity? What area will that charity cover? How many charities will overlap in coverage in large cities? How will little villages and burgs in the hinterlands have any coverage at all? What would be the continuity of service for place to place? State to state and how would you even know? Who would work for all those charities when employment would depend on the ebb and flow of donations?

    Those are a few questions I have concerning the "let someone else do it" mentality.










    "When Faith preaches Hate, Blessed are the Doubters." - Amin Maalouf

    When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often, that person is crazy. ~Dave Barry



  4. #534
    Global Moderator
    Moderator

    Gina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:46 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Liberal
    Posts
    31,892

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Risky Thicket View Post
    I'm betting JC has zip experience working for/with charities. His let the other guy do it is likely a position of ignorance.

    Nationally, something JC doesn't seem to know, most local charities are tapped out and have been since 2008. But, let's suppose for a minute they aren't. Where in the world would charities find the diverse expertise to qualify applicants and determine what precisely is needed. JC doesn't know that most physicians don't know how to write prescriptions for assistive technology or DME. And really they shouldn't know. Assistive technology and DME is often post medical.

    The "let other people do it" mentality is often dismissive and almost always a position of ignorance. How will these "other people" working in charities do it? Who will cover them for liability? JC never thought about that? Will one person in a charity be responsible for evaluating, proscribing and training ALS patients with augmentative communication devices? Will that same person provide evaluations, training, etc. eye gaze technology for quads or people who have CP? Will that same person provide the same services for screen readers for people who are blind? Will that same person provide audiological services for people with hearing loss? Of course that person would have to be fluent in ASL as well. Is this same person going to provide workplace evaluations for all of the above and more? Of course this same person working for the charity would also have to have had training in seating and positioning as well. I'm betting JC has no idea that wheelchairs are not at all alike. Improper seating and positioning can cause serious problems. JC's charity person would also need to be able to evaluate the need for and install environmental controls. Not to mention the fact that as with much of the technology environmental controls often need to be engineered per person, per environment. That same person in JC's charity will need to be able to assess a hard of hearing person's work environment to determine what telecommunication device(s) would be required. That would include installing magnetic induction loops, interfacing FM systems with sound boards and making all that compatible with various levels of hearing aid/cochlear implant technology - and training staff and hard of hearing people how to use the technology.

    JC's charity person will have to be able to trouble shoot untold issues such as figuring out how to get an employed person in a motorized wheelchair who have limited range of motion to the 11th floor of a building when that person cannot reach the elevator buttons.

    Of course one person could not do all of the above by a long shot. It requires many specialists, trained and educated and current in their knowledge of technology and in disability law as well. How is all that going to be funded by JC's charity? What area will that charity cover? How many charities will overlap in coverage in large cities? How will little villages and burgs in the hinterlands have any coverage at all? What would be the continuity of service for place to place? State to state and how would you even know? Who would work for all those charities when employment would depend on the ebb and flow of donations?

    Those are a few questions I have concerning the "let someone else do it" mentality.
    Spot on Risky! These are the obstacles any charity would have to face in taking over funding for those with disability, which he clearly does not understand. Disability covers such a broad spectrum of issues. It's not a one size fits all proposition and the details of how to provide for each different person with disabilities, is as varied as each person is from another.

    He fails to recognize that many of the people in government and outside of it, who help in administering aid, have degrees specializing in the field. What good is helping someone if the giver doesn't know exactly how to help? I have small experience in dealing with disabilities, but this kind of issue has comes up in charitable works I have been involved in. People come in with money and then are like huh? We can't just throw money at it?

    To the point and well done and well done, Risky.
    I don't attack my constituents. Bob is my constituent now.
    This is the important stuff. We canít get lost in discrimination. We canít get lost in B.S. We canít get lost tearing each other down. I want to make a point here that no matter what you look like, where you come from, how you worship, who you love, how you identify, and yeah, how you run, that if you have good public policy ideas, if you are well qualified for office, bring those ideas to the table, because this is your America, too. This is our commonwealth of Virginia, too.
    Danica Roem - The nation's first openly transgender person elected to serve in a U.S. state legislature.

  5. #535
    Sewer Rat
    Risky Thicket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Last Seen
    Today @ 08:58 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Independent
    Posts
    23,803

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    More lunacy from the willfully ignorant.










    "When Faith preaches Hate, Blessed are the Doubters." - Amin Maalouf

    When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often, that person is crazy. ~Dave Barry



  6. #536
    Angry Former GOP Voter
    Fiddytree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Last Seen
    Today @ 02:40 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Centrist
    Posts
    25,686

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Risky Thicket View Post
    More lunacy from the willfully ignorant.
    Yep, there was a thread on this at around the same time this thread first popped up.
    Michael J Petrilli-"Is School Choice Enough?"-A response to the recent timidity of American conservatives toward education reform. https://nationalaffairs.com/publicat...-choice-enough

  7. #537
    Sage
    JC Callender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 05:51 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    5,632

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Risky Thicket View Post
    I'm betting JC has zip experience working for/with charities. His let the other guy do it is likely a position of ignorance.

    Nationally, something JC doesn't seem to know, most local charities are tapped out and have been since 2008. But, let's suppose for a minute they aren't. Where in the world would charities find the diverse expertise to qualify applicants and determine what precisely is needed. JC doesn't know that most physicians don't know how to write prescriptions for assistive technology or DME. And really they shouldn't know. Assistive technology and DME is often post medical.

    The "let other people do it" mentality is often dismissive and almost always a position of ignorance. How will these "other people" working in charities do it? Who will cover them for liability? JC never thought about that? Will one person in a charity be responsible for evaluating, proscribing and training ALS patients with augmentative communication devices? Will that same person provide evaluations, training, etc. eye gaze technology for quads or people who have CP? Will that same person provide the same services for screen readers for people who are blind? Will that same person provide audiological services for people with hearing loss? Of course that person would have to be fluent in ASL as well. Is this same person going to provide workplace evaluations for all of the above and more? Of course this same person working for the charity would also have to have had training in seating and positioning as well. I'm betting JC has no idea that wheelchairs are not at all alike. Improper seating and positioning can cause serious problems. JC's charity person would also need to be able to evaluate the need for and install environmental controls. Not to mention the fact that as with much of the technology environmental controls often need to be engineered per person, per environment. That same person in JC's charity will need to be able to assess a hard of hearing person's work environment to determine what telecommunication device(s) would be required. That would include installing magnetic induction loops, interfacing FM systems with sound boards and making all that compatible with various levels of hearing aid/cochlear implant technology - and training staff and hard of hearing people how to use the technology.

    JC's charity person will have to be able to trouble shoot untold issues such as figuring out how to get an employed person in a motorized wheelchair who have limited range of motion to the 11th floor of a building when that person cannot reach the elevator buttons.

    Of course one person could not do all of the above by a long shot. It requires many specialists, trained and educated and current in their knowledge of technology and in disability law as well. How is all that going to be funded by JC's charity? What area will that charity cover? How many charities will overlap in coverage in large cities? How will little villages and burgs in the hinterlands have any coverage at all? What would be the continuity of service for place to place? State to state and how would you even know? Who would work for all those charities when employment would depend on the ebb and flow of donations?

    Those are a few questions I have concerning the "let someone else do it" mentality.
    You're accusing me of having a "let other people do it" mentality....where do you get that from? I'm saying people shouldn't be forced to give, they should give if they want to. You're the one forcing other people against their will to pay for your programs! And how could you have such a low opinion of the potential of the average American when you think that no one could possibly compare in efficiency to our government. What kind of hell hole was this country before entitlements in your opinion?

  8. #538
    Sage
    JC Callender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 05:51 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    5,632

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gina View Post
    I shouldn't have even entertained congressional approval ratings. It has little to nothing to do with whether to fund or not people with disabilities.

    Indeed you can choose another charity which is why depending on them to deliver basic services, is foolish.

    We aren't discussing the War on Poverty. We are discussing aid to those with disabilities. You asked me to show you need, so I showed you a need that the private sector is not filling. Let us stick to the topic.

    I think that is a naive position. Aid to those with disabilities doesn't go away unlike the majority of the work that is accomplished in putting lives back together after a disaster. There is no plan for ongoing lifetime funding.

    You are playing up Komen. They raise a lot in comparison to other non-profits, but they can only fund 10-15% of all valuable research requests. 90-85% of requesting researchers have to go find another entity for funding. Often, that's the government. If you read the link to Komen, they grant the most money for breast cancer research, $63 million in 2011 compared to American Cancer society's $17 million for breast cancer research. Obviously they are not filling 90-85% of those unfunded grants. Charity cannot do it all on its own and neither can the government.

    You know, I have never once thought of not donating to something, hello breast cancer research, because the government took care of it. If they are asking, then there is a need to be fulfilled.

    Maybe you would? How would you approach it? What would be your goal in helping people with disabilities? How would you determine if someone was eligible to receive your help and at what level?
    You really shouldn't continually discount the massive failures of our government and then assume beyond the shadow of a doubt that our citizens couldn't do a better job. As far as what I would do if it were my charity, I would determine exactly what's wrong with them, drug test them, and schedule regular visits with them to start.

  9. #539
    Sage
    JC Callender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Metro Detroit
    Last Seen
    12-08-17 @ 05:51 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    5,632

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gina View Post
    Spot on Risky! These are the obstacles any charity would have to face in taking over funding for those with disability, which he clearly does not understand. Disability covers such a broad spectrum of issues. It's not a one size fits all proposition and the details of how to provide for each different person with disabilities, is as varied as each person is from another.

    He fails to recognize that many of the people in government and outside of it, who help in administering aid, have degrees specializing in the field. What good is helping someone if the giver doesn't know exactly how to help? I have small experience in dealing with disabilities, but this kind of issue has comes up in charitable works I have been involved in. People come in with money and then are like huh? We can't just throw money at it?

    To the point and well done and well done, Risky.
    Don't you think that anyone outside of the government has a degree or any expertise in running anything?

    Just curious, what would you do if the government cut out all entitlements tomorrow?

  10. #540
    Sage
    polgara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 11:08 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Other
    Posts
    18,343

    Re: What does disability mean to you and who qualifies?

    Quote Originally Posted by JC Callender View Post
    You're accusing me of having a "let other people do it" mentality....where do you get that from? I'm saying people shouldn't be forced to give, they should give if they want to. You're the one forcing other people against their will to pay for your programs! And how could you have such a low opinion of the potential of the average American when you think that no one could possibly compare in efficiency to our government. What kind of hell hole was this country before entitlements in your opinion?
    Well, people were more polite; they looked out for each other; they weren't looking to race bait and divide; children were free to do children things ike playing baseball all day in the summer, or sledriding half the night in the winter without adults worrying about their safety; and most people minded their own business and obeyed the laws....yeah, it was a real hellhole back in those days! Too bad it's gone....

    Good evening, JC. :

Page 54 of 58 FirstFirst ... 4445253545556 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •