View Poll Results: Is Obesity a Disability

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  • Yes, it is a disability.

    17 19.10%
  • No, it isn't a disability.

    55 61.80%
  • Maybe? Too much going on to say definitively.

    17 19.10%
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Thread: Is Obesity a disability?

  1. #81
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lursa View Post
    Oh I see, you were looking at it more long term. Then yes, the result can be the same....except they look at things like those behaviors smoking, skiing, etc, as risk factors but they dont look at 'eating' as a risk factor (That I know of)
    There may be a higher premium for obese people than others. I don't know for sure, but it would make sense.
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mason66 View Post
    For me it is important to know why they are obese.

    If it is a medical condition I could go along with it.

    if it is a choice, or they can't control what they put in their mouth, then no.
    All obesity at the extreme level is because of "fork in mouth disease" coupled with "couch potato syndrome".

    Fat cannot build without the resources to do so. You limit those resources available to build fat by restricting the number of calories to those necessary to run bodily systems and by burning off any excess. Even those who suffer from medical conditions that limit exercise (I do), they can still control intake and still do limited exercise to control tendencies towards obesity.

    Am I in perfect shape? No. I do suffer from limitations. But I am only a little over weight (25lbs or so) not obese to the level that the walking circus tents are. In the end, it doesn't matter what tendencies your body has, without the necessary resources to build fat, it cannot.
    Only a fool measures equality by results and not opportunities.

  3. #83
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hijinx View Post
    As the topic states: Do you think that obesity counts as a legitimate disability?

    It's a pretty big deal in employment law according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and they count it as such under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act. For all intents and purposes it would make sense that it does count as a disability, as they are technically disabled by definition (physical impairment or lack of physical functioning). But I just can't help but disagree with the notion. Especially considering how I know many people and I'm sure many of you might as well, who eat themselves into that situation. They're literally eating and drinking themselves into being disabled, and they get counted among those who are actually medically obese. That's just wrong to me.

    Here is a humorous article about the subject: Obesity: A Disability or a Lack of Responsibility? | We Are People 2

    Thoughts?
    I think you hit the nail on the head, only those who have a medical condition that causes obesity should be considered to have a disability. No one else. For most being being obese is a personal choice that if they so chose could do something about it. Granting all fat people a disability is just plain crazy to me.
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  4. #84
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hijinx View Post
    As the topic states: Do you think that obesity counts as a legitimate disability?

    It's a pretty big deal in employment law according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and they count it as such under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act. For all intents and purposes it would make sense that it does count as a disability, as they are technically disabled by definition (physical impairment or lack of physical functioning). But I just can't help but disagree with the notion. Especially considering how I know many people and I'm sure many of you might as well, who eat themselves into that situation. They're literally eating and drinking themselves into being disabled, and they get counted among those who are actually medically obese. That's just wrong to me.

    Here is a humorous article about the subject: http://wearepeople2.com/obesity-a-di...esponsibility/

    Thoughts?



    There's no doubt that obese people are less able than those who aren't obese.

    But why are they obese?

    If it's a self-inflicted problem, then they need to deal with it themselves.

  5. #85
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by shrubnose View Post
    There's no doubt that obese people are less able than those who aren't obese.

    But why are they obese?

    If it's a self-inflicted problem, then they need to deal with it themselves.
    Playing Devil's Advocate....what about drug addicts and alcoholics?

    Many employer policies include rehab. (Not something I necessarily agree with).

    Do you think we'll end up sending obese people to 'fat farms' on taxpayer supported health ins?
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have felt pain when I was in the womb. So when you say they are incapable of feeling pain, that is based on junk science.
    Quote Originally Posted by applejuicefool View Post
    A murderer putting a bullet through someone's brain is a medical procedure too.

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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lursa View Post
    Playing Devil's Advocate....what about drug addicts and alcoholics?

    Many employer policies include rehab. (Not something I necessarily agree with).

    Do you think we'll end up sending obese people to 'fat farms' on taxpayer supported health ins?



    I won't be a bit surprised when that happens, and I do believe that a lot of obese people should pay their own bills because it's a self-inflicted problem.

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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by shrubnose View Post
    I won't be a bit surprised when that happens, and I do believe that a lot of obese people should pay their own bills because it's a self-inflicted problem.
    Yeah but what about drug addicts and alcoholics. We've ended up diagnosing those as 'diseases.' (Alcoholism at least).

    I can see obesity following that trend
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    I have felt pain when I was in the womb. So when you say they are incapable of feeling pain, that is based on junk science.
    Quote Originally Posted by applejuicefool View Post
    A murderer putting a bullet through someone's brain is a medical procedure too.

  8. #88
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andalublue View Post
    I think culture has a lot to do with obesity. It's a growing problem here in Spain, especially amongst kids who do very little exercise. Sports don't feature much in the schools' curriculum and the popularity of computer games and online social networking means that they don't do enough physical activity. The growing marketing of fast foods is also a part of the problem. Fortunately, that's not such a big deal here in the sticks where there isn't a McDonalds within 60km, but store-bought, highly processed foods are an issue, as are deadly, sugar-laden fizzy drinks.

    Personally, I don't know any friends or neighbours who are morbidly obese although many, like me, could do to lose 20lbs or so.

    What I see from the States (and parts of northern Europe) is that poor eating choices and unhealthy leisure activities are almost fetishised. The number of US sitcoms that show people arriving to work with huge trays of frosted and chocolatey doughnuts to share around has always struck me as weird. Do people really do that? Also, and someone will correct me if I'm wrong, people in the States seem to eat out at fast food diners and restaurants incredibly often and the kind of foods they eat in those places are all high-fat, high-sugar content fayre. I've nothing against fat-food joints as a very occasional treat, but Americans (and Brits, Germans, Dutch, Canadians etc) seem to do so far more than just 'occasionally'.

    I'm probably about 12kg (25lbs) over my ideal weight for my age and height and I need to do something about that. I cook for a living and that always runs the risk of over-eating and drinking too much alcohol, but in my experience, the key is exercise. A lot of people get into a vicious cycle of over-eating, putting on weight and then feeling that exercise it too hard, so they don't, and the weight carries on increasing, leading to exercise seeming even harder. Everyone needs to be taught and encouraged to see how it is possible to break that cycle, start enjoying exercise again, and stop using comfort food as, well a comfort to forget about feeling unfit.
    Yes, absolutely. Easy eating and sedentary lifestyles are considered "the way forward." You're thought less of if you don't have a job that requires you to sit at a desk all day. If you're a mechanic or an electrician, you're low class or less intelligent, even though, let's be frank, that is an INCREDIBLY complicated job sometimes. I know an electrician who blew my mind with all the math and physics he's learned in the course of trying to be better at his job.

    But because you're not sitting in a pressed shirt, it's looked down on.

    As to your do-people-really-come-home-with-donuts question, yes, they do. They really do that. And yes, there are a lot of people who eat fast food several times a week -- for some people, every single day. And then they go on to say they can't lose weight. Hm...

    Yeah, the extra 20 is really easy to do, and that I completely understand. Hell, my dad wound up with the extra 20 just from feeding me, basically. We ate high quality stuff, but I was a teenager who fenced pretty hard and had a metabolism like a rabbit and burned through food like it was going out of style. He tended to just eat whatever he'd made me in the same quantity. My dad had a pretty good metabolism for a middle-aged man, but certainly not as fast as mine, and it put a couple pounds on him. As soon as I moved out, it melted off -- he started eating according to his own need for food, rather than mine. He was also a bit more active, now that his daily life wasn't as home-centered.

    And I've had friends who've put on the extra 20 after getting their first desk job and woke up and gone, "Time to go to the gym." Or maybe their metabolism just dove after they came out of their teens, and they have to bring down their consumption or ramp up their exercise.

    It's super easy to do that in a society where sometimes we're required to be sedentary for much of the day and food is over-abundant for many of us.

    But as you say, we have a degree of obesity in America that you don't find in too many other places. It just gets out of control. I live in the fittest city in the US, and I see people who are on the edge of mobility almost every day. How does this happen?

    I understand the extra 20, and people who wake up and go, "Whoa, I put on some weight," and then go get themselves a diet plan and a gym card. I don't understand how people don't say that to themselves after putting on an extra 200, or 300, or 400. I've gotten out of shape lately for a number of reasons, some of which were a bit outside my control, and even though I'm not gaining weight (I still seem to have a redonkulous metabolism), I did physically feel bad, and eventually I just had to get off my ass and do something. I couldn't take feeling bad anymore -- just couldn't take it. Yeah, it's hard to start, even if you're not fat. Some trainers actually think it can be even harder for people who are thin and out of shape -- they don't need as much muscle to move themselves around, so they can experience a greater degree of wasting and weakness than someone who's overweight.

    But being really out of shape, no matter what your weight, just feels miserable. How do people take it? How do people keep doing the stuff they know is making them miserable? I don't understand it.

  9. #89
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeAndMirrors View Post
    Yes, absolutely. Easy eating and sedentary lifestyles are considered "the way forward." You're thought less of if you don't have a job that requires you to sit at a desk all day. If you're a mechanic or an electrician, you're low class or less intelligent, even though, let's be frank, that is an INCREDIBLY complicated job sometimes. I know an electrician who blew my mind with all the math and physics he's learned in the course of trying to be better at his job.

    But because you're not sitting in a pressed shirt, it's looked down on.

    As to your do-people-really-come-home-with-donuts question, yes, they do. They really do that. And yes, there are a lot of people who eat fast food several times a week -- for some people, every single day. And then they go on to say they can't lose weight. Hm...

    Yeah, the extra 20 is really easy to do, and that I completely understand. Hell, my dad wound up with the extra 20 just from feeding me, basically. We ate high quality stuff, but I was a teenager who fenced pretty hard and had a metabolism like a rabbit and burned through food like it was going out of style. He tended to just eat whatever he'd made me in the same quantity. My dad had a pretty good metabolism for a middle-aged man, but certainly not as fast as mine, and it put a couple pounds on him. As soon as I moved out, it melted off -- he started eating according to his own need for food, rather than mine. He was also a bit more active, now that his daily life wasn't as home-centered.

    And I've had friends who've put on the extra 20 after getting their first desk job and woke up and gone, "Time to go to the gym." Or maybe their metabolism just dove after they came out of their teens, and they have to bring down their consumption or ramp up their exercise.

    It's super easy to do that in a society where sometimes we're required to be sedentary for much of the day and food is over-abundant for many of us.

    But as you say, we have a degree of obesity in America that you don't find in too many other places. It just gets out of control. I live in the fittest city in the US, and I see people who are on the edge of mobility almost every day. How does this happen?

    I understand the extra 20, and people who wake up and go, "Whoa, I put on some weight," and then go get themselves a diet plan and a gym card. I don't understand how people don't say that to themselves after putting on an extra 200, or 300, or 400. I've gotten out of shape lately for a number of reasons, some of which were a bit outside my control, and even though I'm not gaining weight (I still seem to have a redonkulous metabolism), I did physically feel bad, and eventually I just had to get off my ass and do something. I couldn't take feeling bad anymore -- just couldn't take it. Yeah, it's hard to start, even if you're not fat. Some trainers actually think it can be even harder for people who are thin and out of shape -- they don't need as much muscle to move themselves around, so they can experience a greater degree of wasting and weakness than someone who's overweight.

    But being really out of shape, no matter what your weight, just feels miserable. How do people take it?
    How do people keep doing the stuff they know is making them miserable? I don't understand it
    .



    There are plenty of possible explanations, but I believe that in a lot of cases it's because they enjoy doing what's creating their problem, and they don't have the willpower to get it under control.

  10. #90
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    Re: Is Obesity a disability?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hijinx View Post
    As the topic states: Do you think that obesity counts as a legitimate disability?

    It's a pretty big deal in employment law according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and they count it as such under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act. For all intents and purposes it would make sense that it does count as a disability, as they are technically disabled by definition (physical impairment or lack of physical functioning). But I just can't help but disagree with the notion. Especially considering how I know many people and I'm sure many of you might as well, who eat themselves into that situation. They're literally eating and drinking themselves into being disabled, and they get counted among those who are actually medically obese. That's just wrong to me.

    Here is a humorous article about the subject: Obesity: A Disability or a Lack of Responsibility? | We Are People 2

    Thoughts?
    It's a disability once it interferes with their ability to leave their home and support themselves/family financially. I worked with a girl who was extremely large and she married a guy who was extremely large. Both of them worked every day and made a good income. She did suffer from challenges created by her extra 200 lbs such as leg chafing and her shoes never fit properly because of the need to buy shoes in a larger size due to the extra fat on her foot.

    She is the only person I knew personally that overweight.

    She was molested at a young age repeatedly by a babysitter. She maintains that contributed to her need to constantly eat (extra padding and protection) I think it's possible.

    It's a hard fight. She got a lap band placed and that worked for a while. Then her weight shot up again. The key she found that worked for her was bulimia. She is still what I would think of as quite big but nothing like she was. However if she does not stop the bulimia it may well kill her.

    Sad but true.

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