View Poll Results: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

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Thread: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

  1. #41
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fisher View Post
    Tell that to Josie. She has boobies and verified that some women go to college to husband shop. Why would grad school be any different? Here is a clue: It is not. Geez, do I need to buy you the Spark Notes on the human condition?
    To clarify.... I don't think the majority of women go to college to find a man.


  2. #42
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan5 View Post
    I do notice a lot of single degreed women, even pretty ones, in their twenties and thirties. It's sad because I don't think with the careerist mindset they have that they will ever find a man that earns more than them.



    That's what I notice. A ton of degreed, 24-35 women making 35-50k a year thinking they're going to find a 30-35 year old guy making 60-150k+. It just isn't going to happen and they don't see it. It really is out there. There's tons of it. These women have been lied to. There are more degreed women now among under 40's than there are men and those women don't realize that the ratios aren't 1:1. The reality is a lot of these women will never marry because they wait until 28-35 and then realize Mr. 95k a year isn't there and it's too late. Men their own age won't marry them because they don't earn what they earn or they earn the same so they want a woman who earns less and is less careerist, and the irony is these women, even after these facts, still often cannot accept being with men that don't earn significantly more than they do.


    The truth is many of these degreed women are in fact never going to marry.
    Opinion - devoid of facts.

    This means nothing.
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  3. #43
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by captainawesome View Post
    Reality is women are and want to be professionals and 80% are not in grad school looking for a sugar daddy.
    How wonderful then that I never suggested that they were.

    (Hint: reading comprehension is key)
    Quod scripsi, scripsi

  4. #44
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fisher View Post
    Tell that to Josie. She has boobies and verified that some women go to college to husband shop. Why would grad school be any different? Here is a clue: It is not. Geez, do I need to buy you the Spark Notes on the human condition?
    Ah well you got a woman to agree that women are not serious and spend a hundred grand to be a glorified prostitute.

    women waste taxpayers time faking education and honestly should just walk the streets like proper whores.

  5. #45
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oftencold View Post
    Why, by looking to the way people now, and always have behaved. To do otherwise might make one a good Marxist, but requires a divorce from Reality.



    Just in the ways so clearly described in my other posts on the topic.




    Well, for one thing, human Nature is real, while same sex "marriage," is a perverse fantasy.

    That said, form time to time in history, homosexual practitioners attempt to gain acceptability for their little peccadilloes. While they sometimes gain limited success in elites and rarely in militant classes, in short order they are once again suppressed by more vital classes, societies countries or conquerors. It is a recurring pattern, across many times and cultures and thus likely an expression of natural tendency. In the case of out own society, the casual and dispassionate historical observer will note the revival of Traditional Militant Islam worldwide, and its homicidal suppression of overt homosexuality. What will likely be written on the next page of history on this sordid topic is not terribly hard to imagine.



    No. Those issues are cultural and societal, obviously. The interested student is referred to a study of the rule of women in modern, wealthy and vital Islamic nations.

    However, assuming at least a great amount of time in the future of Humanity, it is hard to imagine that just about any form of society that has occurred in the past will not recur in the future.
    OK ...

    I understand the basis for machismo fundamentalism, and don't take such opinions seriously.
    Every political good carried to the extreme must be productive of evil.

  6. #46
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oftencold View Post
    How wonderful then that I never suggested that they were.

    (Hint: reading comprehension is key)
    I am with you man. Women don't deserve the education. None have been smart enough to say they aren't just whores so they must be whores.

  7. #47
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by captainawesome View Post
    I am with you man. Women don't deserve the education. None have been smart enough to say they aren't just whores so they must be whores.
    You are not with me in any manner.

    You are prancing about in some delusion of your own, unfettered by reason or facts.

    As a mercy, I leave you unto your sweet, sweet imaginings.
    Quod scripsi, scripsi

  8. #48
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by SMTA View Post
    Opinion - devoid of facts.

    This means nothing.

    Wrong.


    Forbes says otherwise.

    Careers And Marriage - Forbes


    Point: Don’t Marry Career Women

    By Michael Noer

    How do women, careers and marriage mix? Not well, say social scientists.



    Guys: a word of advice. Marry pretty women or ugly ones. Short ones or tall ones. Blondes or brunettes. Just, whatever you do, don’t marry a woman with a career.



    Why? Because if many social scientists are to be believed, you run a higher risk of having a rocky marriage. While everyone knows that marriage can be stressful, recent studies have found professional women are more likely to get divorced, more likely to cheat and less likely to have children. And if they do have kids, they are more likely to be unhappy about it. A recent study in Social Forces, a research journal, found that women–even those with a “feminist” outlook–are happier when their husband is the primary breadwinner.



    Not a happy conclusion, especially given that many men, particularly successful men, are attracted to women with similar goals and aspirations. And why not? After all, your typical career girl is well educated, ambitious, informed and engaged. All seemingly good things, right? Sure at least until you get married. Then, to put it bluntly, the more successful she is, the more likely she is to grow dissatisfied with you. Sound familiar?



    Many factors contribute to a stable marriage, including the marital status of your spouse’s parents (folks with divorced parents are significantly more likely to get divorced themselves), age at first marriage, race, religious beliefs and socio-economic status. And, of course, many working women are indeed happily and fruitfully married–it’s just that they are less likely to be so than nonworking women. And that, statistically speaking, is the rub.



    To be clear, we’re not talking about a high school dropout minding a cash register. For our purposes, a “career girl” has a university-level (or higher) education, works more than 35 hours a week outside the home and makes more than $30,000 a year.



    If a host of studies are to be believed, marrying these women is asking for trouble. If they quit their jobs and stay home with the kids, they will be unhappy (Journal of Marriage and Family, 2003). They will be unhappy if they make more money than you do (Social Forces, 2006). You will be unhappy if they make more money than you do (Journal of Marriage and Family, 2001). You will be more likely to fall ill (American Journal of Sociology). Even your house will be dirtier (Institute for Social Research).



    Why? Well, despite the fact that the link between work, women and divorce rates is complex and controversial, much of the reasoning is based on a lot of economic theory and a bit of common sense. In classic economics, a marriage is, at least in part, an exercise in labor specialization. Traditionally, men have tended to do “market” or paid work outside the home, and women have tended to do “nonmarket” or household work, including raising children. All of the work must get done by somebody, and this pairing, regardless of who is in the home and who is outside the home, accomplishes that goal. Nobel laureate Gary S. Becker argued that when the labor specialization in a marriage decreases–if, for example, both spouses have careers–the overall value of the marriage is lower for both partners because less of the total needed work is getting done, making life harder for both partners and divorce more likely. And, indeed, empirical studies have concluded just that.



    In 2004, John H. Johnson examined data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation and concluded that gender has a significant influence on the relationship between work hours and increases in the probability of divorce. Women’s work hours consistently increase divorce, whereas increases in men’s work hours often have no statistical effect. “I also find that the incidence in divorce is far higher in couples where both spouses are working than in couples where only one spouse is employed,” Johnson says. A few other studies, which have focused on employment (as opposed to working hours), have concluded that working outside the home actually increases marital stability, at least when the marriage is a happy one. But even in these studies, wives’ employment does correlate positively to divorce rates, when the marriage is of “low marital quality.”



    The other reason a career can hurt a marriage will be obvious to anyone who has seen his or her mate run off with a co-worker: When your spouse works outside the home, chances increase that he or she will meet someone more likable than you. “The work environment provides a host of potential partners,” researcher Adrian J. Blow reported in The Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, “and individuals frequently find themselves spending a great deal of time with these individuals.”



    There’s more: According to a wide-ranging review of the published literature, highly educated people are more likely to have had extramarital sex (those with graduate degrees are 1.75 times more likely to have cheated than those with high school diplomas). Additionally, individuals who earn more than $30,000 a year are more likely to cheat.



    And if the cheating leads to divorce, you’re really in trouble. Divorce has been positively correlated with higher rates of alcoholism, clinical depression and suicide. Other studies have associated divorce with increased rates of cancer, stroke, and sexually transmitted disease. Plus, divorce is financially devastating. According to one recent study on “Marriage and Divorce’s Impact on Wealth,” published in The Journal of Sociology, divorced people see their overall net worth drop an average of 77%.



    So why not just stay single? Because, academically speaking, a solid marriage has a host of benefits beyond just individual “happiness.” There are broader social and health implications as well. According to a 2004 paper titled “What Do Social Scientists Know About the Benefits of Marriage?,” marriage is positively associated with “better outcomes for children under most circumstances” and higher earnings for adult men, and “being married and being in a satisfying marriage are positively associated with health and negatively associated with mortality.” In other words, a good marriage is associated with a higher income, a longer, healthier life and better-adjusted kids.



    A word of caution, though: As with any social scientific study, it’s important not to confuse correlation with causation. In other words, just because married folks are healthier than single people, it doesn’t mean that marriage is causing the health gains. It could just be that healthier people are more likely to be married.

  9. #49
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by marywollstonecraft View Post
    OK ...

    I understand the basis for machismo fundamentalism, and don't take such opinions seriously.
    That is indeed unfortunate, since the observations which you blithely mislabel are grounded in pitiless Reality.
    Quod scripsi, scripsi

  10. #50
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    Re: Do Degreed women have a harder time finding a Husband?

    Quote Originally Posted by Josie View Post
    To clarify.... I don't think the majority of women go to college to find a man.
    Of course not--some go to find a woman.

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