View Poll Results: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

Voters
15. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, and without qualification.

    7 46.67%
  • Yes, but limited (please elaborate on limits).

    3 20.00%
  • No, we really don't need it.

    3 20.00%
  • Other.

    2 13.33%
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

  1. #11
    Phonetic Mnemonic ©
    radcen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Look to your right... I'm that guy.
    Last Seen
    Today @ 10:38 PM
    Lean
    Centrist
    Posts
    33,397

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by Voltaire X View Post
    It would be more than just what the 4th Amendment protects. The 4th amendment addresses unreasonable government searches and seizures. I would like to see an amendment that limits what potential employers can require their potential employees to provide. For instance, I think that requiring employees to give their social networking (facebook) login info and passwords is an invasion of privacy and morally wrong, and I'd like to see people protected from that. I also think that drug testing for jobs that do not require use of heavy/dangerous machinery is an invasion of privacy and immoral. Another example is asking the question "Have you ever been charged with a crime?" It should be totally illegal to require employees to answer that. Asking if they've been CONVICTED is fine, but the fact that you could be mistakenly charged, later found innocent, but still discriminated against simply because of the charge is BEYOND ridiculous.
    I'm with you on all these, but especially the part in red.
    If you claim sexual harassment to be wrong, yet you defend anyone on your side for any reason,
    then you are a hypocrite and everything you say on the matter is just babble.

  2. #12
    Sage
    jamesrage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A place where common sense exists
    Last Seen
    Yesterday @ 09:23 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Slightly Conservative
    Posts
    31,067

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by ttwtt78640 View Post
    If no gov't action now results from the "watching" then what would be prevented? No more motor vehicle/firearms records? No more automatic reporting of income for taxation? No more auditing of tax returns? No more traffic cameras? At what point does "watching" or automatic review of data become an invasion of privacy - so long as no gov't action is taken?
    There would be some exceptions like for paying income taxes auditing tax returns. But there should not be any traffic cams,and the maintaining for firearm and vehicle records.

    It shouldn't matter if no government action was taken, it still doesn't change the fact they were watching your ass.If some sicko was watching your wife or kids would you be relieved if that sicko didn't beat off while watching them or would still be pissed and want the sicko locked up so that he can't watch anyone again?
    "A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murder is less to fear"

    Cicero Marcus Tullius

  3. #13
    On Vacation
    joko104's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Seen
    12-03-17 @ 03:32 AM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    31,568
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Yes I would and see that as a great need. Wording? I'm not a legal scholar.

  4. #14
    Guru
    Smeagol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Last Seen
    02-19-17 @ 11:35 PM
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    4,147

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    If you could write it, how would it read and what would it cover?
    We sort of already have one; The Fourth Amendment. I don't know what LSD the Supreme Court was on when they saw a right to privacy in the Fourteenth Amendment.

    Excellent question. I don't have a minute right know to write the language I'd like to see but something that:

    1. Covered private organizations maintaining files on people without their expressed and deliberate permission requiring a signature with an explanation of their agreement to forfeit their right to privacy in BOLD PRINT as opposed to fine print or burried in pages of legalese mumbo junbo that nobody ever reads. The forfeiture of the right to privacy (likely out of ignorance IMHO) expires annually so if a person is duped into handing over their right to privacy to use something like a rewards card or whatever, they must get the person to re-up their permission to have the organization to maintain profiles on them each year expressly saying I want XYZ, inc. to violate my privacy.

    2. Medical records, already statutorily private (supposedly) but since we're addressing privacy, make it constitutional.

    3. If the government spies on someone, they should have a good reason to; get court permission and once the person is deemed not to be a threat, privately NOTIFY HIM of the investigation and why disclosing all information gathered explaining most concerns are thankfully false alarms but all potential threats must be thoroughly investigated and then DESTROY THE DATA COLLECTED.

    4. Any invasion of an American's privacy using offshore shelters to avoid US Constitutional law makes any American involved in such schemes subject to criminal and civil liabilities, foreign nationals additionally subject to deportation and/or are banned from travel to the US.

    5. I know its a big reversal in our current criminal justice culture but I think people who are suspects of crimes should be afforded privacy protection until such time as they are convicted provided they cooperate with officials and don't go into hiding where publicity is needed to apprehend them. Perpwalks and mugshots on the news injure innocent people's reputations under a system where we are supposedly innocent until proven guilty. I have a relative who could not get a job or rent an apartment because he was arrested but later the charges were dropped because potential employers and landlords have access to the arrest records and treat him like a convicted felon despite his status as innocent.

    6. The sexual offender database needs to be used to protect the innocent, not shame people who pose no to threat to anyone and is used as a form of punishment. Only forcible rapists and pedophiles should be listed; not boyfriend turns 18 and girlfriend is still 17, guys can't hold it any longer and takes a leak behind a tree, college girl has too much to drink at Marti Gras and flashes the twins at the crowd, consensual acts in the back of a car at night, etc. Not that I think any of those things are okay but they aren't endangering the public there therefore should not be listed on a registry that is intended to warn the public of a real threat to our safety.

    7. Identity of sexual assault victims unless efforts to locate missing people requires disclosure of the dangers they are in, etc. For the most part its already practiced but only as a courtesy and at the discretion of the media. They sometimes make exceptions.
    Last edited by Smeagol; 06-19-13 at 05:46 PM.
    Having opinions all over the map is a good sign of a person capable of autonomous thinking. Felix -2011

  5. #15
    Mixed Government advocate
    Master PO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    93,000,000 miles from Earth where its very Hot
    Last Seen
    11-30-17 @ 01:52 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian - Right
    Posts
    31,331

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    If you could write it, how would it read and what would it cover?
    how would that be done?

    because under the founding principles of America with our DOI, which is u.s. code and organic law for the u.s. rights are not created by government or the people., but from the creator.

    if rights can be created through the amendment process, then rights could be created for one group of people and not others......something which is outside, our nations foundation

    once something is in the constitution it constitutionality cannot be questioned.

    a new right to privacy, .......would come from the 9th amendment.

  6. #16
    Electrician
    Bob Blaylock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    North 38°28′ West 121°26′
    Last Seen
    Today @ 01:33 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Very Conservative
    Posts
    13,745

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by radcen View Post
    Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    If you could write it, how would it read and what would it cover?
    Yes, I would support such an Amendment. I would word it something like this…

    “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”
    The five great lies of the Left Wrong:
    We can be Godless and free. • “Social justice” through forced redistribution of wealth. • Silencing religious opinions counts as “diversity”. • Freedom without moral and personal responsibility. • Civilization can survive the intentional undermining of the family.

  7. #17
    Sage
    chromium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    A2
    Last Seen
    06-05-17 @ 10:53 AM
    Gender
    Lean
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    16,968

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    If in public, it's difficult to enforce or expect that. In private or an assumed private conversation, they should require a warrant, and there should be more oversight on whether the warrant should have been given. I do think an amendment along those lines would strengthen the fulfillment of respect and common decency that free people are entitled to.

  8. #18
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Last Seen
    07-19-17 @ 03:51 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian
    Posts
    60,458

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Yes. I would support it since it appears necessary for some asinine reason, but on the condition that the word body is defined in such a way to bar taking DNA and fingerprints on arrest. I don't care how that is done, but it needs done.

    Or perhaps it would be better to make it clear that being arrested is NOT the same thing as a warrant, since apparently the supreme court believes a warrant and an arrest are one in the same.

  9. #19
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Last Seen
    07-19-17 @ 03:51 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Libertarian
    Posts
    60,458

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by chromium View Post
    If in public, it's difficult to enforce or expect that. In private or an assumed private conversation, they should require a warrant, and there should be more oversight on whether the warrant should have been given. I do think an amendment along those lines would strengthen the fulfillment of respect and common decency that free people are entitled to.
    Talking to you here on this forum is in the public and just like if I was talking to you in a private area the government has no business trying to find out what we are talking about. It is not their concern and no amount of "you can't expect privacy" matters to what authority the government has.

  10. #20
    Uncanny
    Paschendale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    New York City
    Last Seen
    03-31-16 @ 04:08 PM
    Gender
    Lean
    Socialist
    Posts
    12,510

    Re: Would you support a Constitutional Amendment for privacy?

    I would like it codified that a person has a reasonable expectation of privacy in all of their communications and activities. It should require an express waver in almost every situation to forfeit that expectation. Obviously, the direct recipient of a communication or action constitutes such a waver, but ONLY THEM. If you're talking on a cell phone in a public place, you should legally be able to expect that people aren't going to eavesdrop on you. It's rude, and you reasonably expect privacy from it. So the government shouldn't be doing it either. They shouldn't be reading your e-mails, or basically sticking their nose anywhere it's not wanted... unless they get a warrant. And judges should actually be expected to deny warrants without really good reasons for them. The whole legal methodology for privacy is about finding various reasons to deny people their privacy. The whole mindset of privacy law is a horrible starting place. Start with a really strong right to privacy, and only infringe on it when absolutely necessary.
    Liberté. Égalité. Fraternité.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •