View Poll Results: Is Edward Snowden a Hero or a Traitor

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Thread: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

  1. #31
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Quote Originally Posted by Morality Games View Post
    That works great when the leadership is responsible and deeply invested in the well being of their people and the future of the country. That's not something that can be said to characterize our present government, which is seeded with greedy and vicious people who get selected through procedures that have long since been overtaken by special interest groups and pushed out the influence of ordinary Americans.
    It doesn't matter if it works 'great' or not, it still works better than having an open secret among 300 million plus people, the vast majority of which are unqualified and even those that are have no interest in being responsible for security .

    I'm certainly not non-critical of the general populace. The entire situation we are in is the result of a collective disengagement of the American people, who allowed our political parties and institutions to get taken over piece by piece, refusing to resist or oppose except in arbitrary, partisan, and mostly unhelpful ways. We have a disengaged, largely disillusioned public and a government of greedy, vicious rulers totally under the sway special interest groups who only want too put as much of their burdens as they can't get away on the rest of society.
    Which is a great reason to keep them (the general public) at an arm's length and get involved with government, intelligence, security, and the like if you have an interest in it.
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  2. #32
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    It doesn't matter if it works 'great' or not, it still works better than having an open secret among 300 million plus people, the vast majority of which are unqualified and even those that are have no interest in being responsible for security.
    I mean to say that it has no credibility whatsoever. Even if it looks perfectly reasonable and correct, it doesn't matter because of that lack of credibility. You can't look at a single representative in Congress an say, "I trust that guy to look after me and my family" ahead of "his own interests and that of the special interests that facilitated his rise to power." Even if it looked like such a person might be competent, there is no real compulsion to cooperate with him or believe what he says beyond your own convenience.

    Which is a great reason to keep them (the general public) at an arm's length and get involved with government, intelligence, security, and the like if you have an interest in it.
    We're a democratic society. There is no legitimate authorization for spying on the entire body of American people except from the American people. There's no one else anywhere who has the authority or standing to even propose the idea.
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  3. #33
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Quote Originally Posted by Morality Games View Post
    I mean to say that it has no credibility whatsoever. Even if it looks perfectly reasonable and correct, it doesn't matter because of that lack of credibility. You can't look at a single representative in Congress an say, "I trust that guy to look after me and my family" ahead of "his own interests and that of the special interests that facilitated his rise to power." Even if it looked like such a person might be competent, there is no real compulsion to cooperate with him or believe what he says beyond your own convenience.
    Well, we'll have to agree to disagree. No credibility whatsoever? lol

    We're a democratic society. There is no legitimate authorization for spying on the entire body of American people except from the American people. There's no one else anywhere who has the authority or standing to even propose the idea.
    But again, there's not going to be a national referendum about Top Secret things. The people the populace voted for made the decision. What more do you want?
    The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected.
    -GK Chesterton

  4. #34
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Well, we'll have to agree to disagree. No credibility whatsoever? lol
    My main point is that there is no natural law that endows American politicians or bureaucrats with the right to independently make major transformative decisions for the country without engaging the public in discussion about those changes. While they have some right to innovate when responding to new challenges, abruptly deciding that you are allowed to access all the available personal information of every single person in the country would be like the government saying that nobody could buy cars after they became commercially available while never having a dialogue with either the manufacturers or the people as a whole about the ban.

    But again, there's not going to be a national referendum about Top Secret things. The people the populace voted for made the decision. What more do you want?
    As organized, the representative aspect of government is inadequate to its task. The government is not responsive to the working man and has taken considerable liberties with the country's future and prosperity for the sake of special interest groups. To the extent that continues to be the case, it is a government that, like the government that enforced Prohibition in the 1920s, cannot expect respect or cooperation.
    Last edited by Morality Games; 06-13-13 at 12:55 AM.
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Quote Originally Posted by Morality Games View Post
    My main point is that there is no natural law that endows American politicians or bureaucrats with the right to independently make major transformative decisions for the country without engaging the public in discussion about those changes. While they have some right to innovate when responding to new challenges, abruptly deciding that you are allowed to access all the available personal information of every single person in the country would be like the government saying that nobody could buy cars after they became commercially available while never having a dialogue with either the manufacturers or the people as a whole about the ban.
    Would the meaning behind that ban need any secrecy?

    As organized, the representative aspect of government is inadequate to its task. The government is not responsive to the working man and has taken considerable liberties with the country's future and prosperity for the sake of special interest groups. To the extent that continues to be the case, it is a government that, like the government that enforced Prohibition in the 1920s, cannot expect respect or cooperation.
    That's fine, but has little to do with the facts of this case as it is. You're not telling me what you 'want', you're just saying you're unhappy with this. It's like a guy driving down the street: one day he complains about potholes and asks if anyone is ever going to bother to fix this, the next day, while waiting in traffic for construction crews fixing the potholes, he complains about said traffic.
    The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected.
    -GK Chesterton

  6. #36
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Would the meaning behind that ban need any secrecy?

    It wouldn't matter if it did. In the common law (the body of law the U.S. Constitution that was produced from and now governs) the extent to which the government can intrude into the life and privacy of others is a carefully regulated process because the culture that created the common law (and thus the U.S. Constitution) values those things as part of its way of life. Our polity enjoys broad freedom to intrude into the lives and privacy of certain non-Americans, partly because Americans don't care about them, and so accept the government's logic that those people needed to be investigated at face value. That is one thing, and is not without controversy its own right. However, our polity never enjoyed broad freedom to intrude into the lives and privacy of its own citizens.


    Our government has no right to such secrecy unless it is through the popular acceptance of the American public, which is something our elected representatives are supposed to reflect. Elected representatives and national security bureaucrats can't create that right for themselves, unless it is through force and fear.


    That's fine, but has little to do with the facts of this case as it is. You're not telling me what you 'want', you're just saying you're unhappy with this. It's like a guy driving down the street: one day he complains about potholes and asks if anyone is ever going to bother to fix this, the next day, while waiting in traffic for construction crews fixing the potholes, he complains about said traffic.

    It's not about what I want, or really, about representative government, or even abut the U.S. Constitution and the country's laws. Governments that don't live up to what is expected of them and lose the respect of those they govern also lose their authority, and eventually, all the power that entails. In the case of Prohibition, the government was virtually powerless to enforce an effective ban no matter how many resources it devoted to this task.


    The same holds of unsanctioned intrusions into American privacy.
    Last edited by Morality Games; 06-14-13 at 01:00 PM.
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  7. #37
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Would the meaning behind that ban need any secrecy?

    It wouldn't matter if it did. In the common law (the body of law the U.S. Constitution that was produced from and now governs) the extent to which the government can intrude into the life and privacy of others is a carefully regulated process because the culture that created the common law (and thus the U.S. Constitution) values those things as part of its way of life. Our polity enjoys broad freedom to intrude into the lives and privacy of certain non-Americans, partly because Americans don't care about them, and so accept the logic of the government at face value. However, our polity never enjoyed broad freedom to intrude into the lives and privacy of its own citizens.


    There is no right to secrecy unless it is through the popular acceptance of the American public that our personal information has to be monitored for possible threats. Elected representatives and national security bureaucrats can't create that right for themselves.


    That's fine, but has little to do with the facts of this case as it is. You're not telling me what you 'want', you're just saying you're unhappy with this. It's like a guy driving down the street: one day he complains about potholes and asks if anyone is ever going to bother to fix this, the next day, while waiting in traffic for construction crews fixing the potholes, he complains about said traffic.

    It's not about what I want, or really, about representative government, or even abut the U.S. Constitution and the country's laws. Governments that don't live up to what is expected of them and lose the respect of those they govern also lose their authority, and eventually, all the power that entails. In the case of Prohibition, the government was virtually powerless to enforce an effective ban no matter how many resources it devoted to this task.


    The same holds of unsanctioned intrusions into American privacy.
    If you notice something good in yourself, give credit to God, not to yourself, but be certain the evil you commit is always your own and yours to acknowledge.

    St. Benedict

  8. #38
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    I think he's a hero for exposing the Government spying on every American citizen....I think he's a traitor for exposing the Governemt for hacking into Chinese computers and other things we are doing to OTHER countries.
    "The problem in defense is how far you can go without destroying from within what you are trying to defend from without."

    ~Dwight D. Eisenhower

  9. #39
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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    The gov or NSA gathering info on us should be decided openly, not hidden from us.
    Einstein, "science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind."

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    Re: is edward snowden a hero or traitor?

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveFagan View Post
    That's a load of crap evidenced by the fact that when questioned through the proper channels our NSA leaders "lied outright" to our Congressmen Wyden and Udall. They were testifying to a Senate committee. That would be "lied to us, you and I" because Wyden and Udall were representing you and I in proper legal channels. Prosecute Clapper and McCullough.
    Snowden has admitted his trustless behavior (has admitted he broke his oath of loyalty). Not so sure NSA leaders have. They certainly haven't admitted to same.

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