View Poll Results: What is the future of the nuclear family?

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  • The traditional nuclear family will remain the bedrock of society

    3 12.50%
  • What defines a "family" is changing for the better

    5 20.83%
  • Family values are disintegrating, to the detriment of our culture

    12 50.00%
  • I love lamp.

    4 16.67%
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Thread: What is the future of the nuclear family?

  1. #11
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    The so called historical nuclear family is a myth. Just in my family alone during the depression, three out of the four families my parents and inlaws grew up in, farmed their children out to relatives, older siblings or in one case the neighbors. Two dads were often absent because they were traveling trying to find work, with 2 stay at home moms and 2 part time working moms (school teacher and family hardware business). One set of parents divorced. One mother was committed to a mental hospital. Oh, one dad was found to actually have two families.

    I can cite lots of similar cases.

  2. #12
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by ChunkySalsa View Post
    "It's the economy, stupid"

    The basis of the nuclear family was a single breadwinner able to support the family with just 40 hours/week per family. Nowadays, two parents have to work a combined total of 80 hours and they still have less money than before. Poorer people get married less than richer people, and wealth inequality has been on the rise for the past 40 years.

    If you want more nuclear families, reverse the trend of wealth accumulating at the top and create jobs that can support a family on a combined total of 40 hours/week.
    The reason people have "less money than before" has little to do with so-called wealth inequality. Two earner households make much, much more money than that single earner ever did. The problem is that things cost so much more - housing and healthcare in particular (and god help you if you're saving for college tuition).

  3. #13
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by tech30528 View Post
    Next is the culture of debt being normalized. As we have been subjected to readily available credit we have discovered that we can have basically whatever we want now without having to pay for it. And as carried debt became the normal, the perception of what one could afford has changed to disregard the actual cost and focus instead on being able to make the payments. The problem here is that with the increased interest on the items we have already bought our dollar does not go as far and our future obligations make us slaves to our paychecks. This is all by design of course. We are no longer "citizens", we are "consumers". Pay attention to what you hear and read and see how often we are referred to as each. We are no longer individuals, we are cogs in an economic machine.
    I for one would love to see us "legislate some morality" and start putting some realistic limits on the interest rates banks are allowed to charge. The fact that banks are charging 25% interest and hefty fees on credit cards whilst paying 1% interest on savings is some serious bull****. It destroys people's lives. When banks are choosing to be that immoral and irresponsible, they should not have the government behind them when it comes time to collect money that they never should have lent in the first place.

  4. #14
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    I for one would love to see us "legislate some morality" and start putting some realistic limits on the interest rates banks are allowed to charge. The fact that banks are charging 25% interest and hefty fees on credit cards whilst paying 1% interest on savings is some serious bull****. It destroys people's lives. When banks are choosing to be that immoral and irresponsible, they should not have the government behind them when it comes time to collect money that they never should have lent in the first place.
    It would be difficult to legislate these limits without stepping on a lot of toes, although I suppose we could redefine "usury" to a lower limit. However, there is a way to do this. Do not accept their rates. I know, I know, it goes against the way that we as Americans handle personal finance, and I won't lie, it is difficult to change the way we live. It took me 3 1/2 to get rid of all of our personal debt (and lost a home to foreclosure in the process) and another 2 years to get the business out of debt. BUT, and this is a big but, we do not pay interest to anyone anymore. No car payments (we have 2 cars that are in great shape, hers better than mine), no credit cards and no mortgage. We are considering buying the home we are currently renting, but it will be owner financed. Our landlord owns it outright, she paid it off with insurance money when her husband was killed. Ditto the building my business is in. Owner financed, no banks. Other than real estate I will not buy on installments, and even at that not with a bank or mortgage company. They screwed us all hard enough with the assistance of the government. I won't allow it to happen again. My money goes much further without paying interest, if we can't afford it we don't buy it. THAT is how you beat the greedy banks. The government won't regulate them, but we can. It's easy, too. You just say "NO".

  5. #15
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by tech30528 View Post
    It would be difficult to legislate these limits without stepping on a lot of toes, although I suppose we could redefine "usury" to a lower limit. However, there is a way to do this. Do not accept their rates. I know, I know, it goes against the way that we as Americans handle personal finance, and I won't lie, it is difficult to change the way we live.
    You can't even do that anymore. Under current law, many lenders can increase their rates after you've already borrowed the money.

    I certainly wish it were the case that everyone understood the impact of 25% interest rates, and wish some sort of course in "basic life economics" was a required part of the curriculum. Reality being what it is though, I think it fair to recognize that credit is a two-way agreement between borrower and lender. In situations where people end up barely able to make monthly payments on a debt, that is not just the fault of the borrower, but of the lender as well. Both made poor decisions. If one is to suffer, so should the other. Presently, the consumer does most of the suffering, but (I would argue) the credit card company is most culpable.

    We certainly used to have stricter usury laws, but the legislative trend over the past few decades has largely been to the advantage of banks and to the detriment of consumers. We find that not only in the laws governing lending, but in the behavior of our government and the Fed in response to the recent housing bubble.

  6. #16
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor View Post
    You can't even do that anymore. Under current law, many lenders can increase their rates after you've already borrowed the money.

    I certainly wish it were the case that everyone understood the impact of 25% interest rates, and wish some sort of course in "basic life economics" was a required part of the curriculum. Reality being what it is though, I think it fair to recognize that credit is a two-way agreement between borrower and lender. In situations where people end up barely able to make monthly payments on a debt, that is not just the fault of the borrower, but of the lender as well. Both made poor decisions. If one is to suffer, so should the other. Presently, the consumer does most of the suffering, but (I would argue) the credit card company is most culpable.

    We certainly used to have stricter usury laws, but the legislative trend over the past few decades has largely been to the advantage of banks and to the detriment of consumers. We find that not only in the laws governing lending, but in the behavior of our government and the Fed in response to the recent housing bubble.
    I agree. It certainly used to seem more balanced. During the time that banks were foreclosing everything in sight (and let me be clear here, I do not believe that the bank had no right to take our home back, we were behind because of a new struggling business) a lot of people were taken advantage of. But I think we should have learned quite a lot from this and should not repeat our mistakes. I would argue that debt is the new slavery, and that we voluntarily give up our rights and our futures for the comfort of slavery.

  7. #17
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    We know what this means. We know the social pathologies that correlate with this.
    Actually, we don't know. The "traditional family" had "disintegrated" (on paper) in the Nordic countries before it did elsewhere (more than 50% "illegitimacy" rate) - with precious little "social pathology" to follow.

    Historically, "broken homes" had been a consequence of social and political pathologies - wars, repression, substance abuse, destabilizing subcultures, etc. When families-as-we-used-to-know-them disappear from the census reports because people don't feel compelled to formalize their relationships in the eyes of church and state - that's a whole new ball game.

    We all should pay attention, and conservatives should worry (that's their social and political function, anyway), but "our biggest problem", "without doubt"? Not even close. Not at this point, anyway.

  8. #18
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    We can see a short-term rise in its encouragement. Renewed marriage consciousness encourages traditional structures of two parents and children.
    Michael J Petrilli-"Is School Choice Enough?"-A response to the recent timidity of American conservatives toward education reform. https://nationalaffairs.com/publicat...-choice-enough

  9. #19
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    Re: What is the future of the nuclear family?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Grimm View Post
    My question is: What is the future of the nuclear family?
    Radioactive vapor.
    You know the time is right to take control, we gotta take offense against the status quo

    Quote Originally Posted by A. de Tocqueville
    "I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it."

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