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Thread: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

  1. #71
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker Case View Post
    Why are you dodging the question I keep asking? does it frighten you in some way?

    I suspect that people who feel they are targets of a stereotype will never allow people to be oblivious that a stereotype exists. That's where the intent comes in.

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    To answer your question, I think most of the time people who don't know a particular thing is viewed as a negative racial stereotype, if they're of adult age, are either doing so based on feigned ignorance or essentially CHOSEN ignorance (IE they've heard it before but just never process it in such a way that they'll recall it quickly).

    I think that's the case with the vast majority of such stereotypes, especially the more "common ones". That said, I say "majority", because I do think sometimes you may just not realize. For example...



    ...I had not even THOUGHT about the notion that "cotton picken" was actually a reference to slavery and blacks until this thread. Now I feel like I just got smacked with the "OF COURSE IT IS, STUPID" stick.

    It's similar to when I first heard that "Gypped" was a slur referencing gypsies.

    I do understand that there's a great difference between believing all racial stereotypes are inherently bad or shouldn't be said or talked about or are true/untrue or whatever other deflection people are using to try and refocus the topic....and simply answering whether or not people feign the knowledge of most of said stereotypes.
    I had a smack myself against teh head moment when I learned what gypped referenced, too.
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by AliHajiSheik View Post
    I suspect that people who feel they are targets of a stereotype will never allow people to be oblivious that a stereotype exists. That's where the intent comes in.
    That doesn't even come remotely close to answering my question at all.
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
    No, it's not good. I was in a conversation with a black guy at work up in Michigan, and I said the word "boy" to him (not in a racist fashion, because I wasn't even aware that "boy" wasn't allowed to say). It nearly ended in a fistfight.

    Also, racist jokes aren't nearly as funny if you don't know the stereotypes.
    Boy is one of those ones that I could see going either way....

    I couldn't imagine a grown adult living in the South claiming that they didn't know some find "boy" offensive when said to a black person and it being anything but feigned or intentional ignorance.

    But I absolutely COULD buy someone from the northern reaches of the United States being somewhat oblivious to it, because the lack of historical roots with the word as part of the lexicon in that fashion isn't nearly as strong.

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    Boy is one of those ones that I could see going either way....

    I couldn't imagine a grown adult living in the South claiming that they didn't know some find "boy" offensive when said to a black person and it being anything but feigned or intentional ignorance.

    But I absolutely COULD buy someone from the northern reaches of the United States being somewhat oblivious to it, because the lack of historical roots with the word as part of the lexicon in that fashion isn't nearly as strong.
    Well I was born and raised in Michigan - lived there for almost 30 years. However, all my family lives in Alabama (with a few distant exceptions). Therefore, I did pick up some southern slang, vernacular, jargon, and overall speaking mannerisms. Things like "boy, I tell ya" just became commonplace to me because I hear it enough from my mother and other relatives.

    An innocuous word like "boy" somehow gets twisted into a no-no, and my northern ass had no clue of it.

    Words themselves are not racist - it only gains racist qualities through inflection and intent.

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    Boy is one of those ones that I could see going either way....

    I couldn't imagine a grown adult living in the South claiming that they didn't know some find "boy" offensive when said to a black person and it being anything but feigned or intentional ignorance.

    But I absolutely COULD buy someone from the northern reaches of the United States being somewhat oblivious to it, because the lack of historical roots with the word as part of the lexicon in that fashion isn't nearly as strong.
    For ****s and giggles, respond with "Who the **** are you callin' boy?" the next time a black person calls you a "white boy".
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker Case View Post
    I had a smack myself against teh head moment when I learned what gypped referenced, too.
    I Guess that's my point though, I don't think there's a black and white answer. I think there's a large difference between "Blacks like Fried Chicken and Watermelon" or "Southerners Love NACSAR" or "Irish people Drink" and things like "Italians are momma's boys", "Blacks have nappy hair", or even "Hispanics never use cross walks".

    I think the first three are examples of things that are routinely ingrained in culture in some fashion. The first is a common example of BAD stereotyping and racism, the second is a common notion about a semi-major sport, and the thidr is an oft joked about thing especially around a certain holiday.

    In terms of the latter...I'm Italian and honestly it took me a moment to stop and think "yeah, I think I've heard that before" for that to even register. I had to stop and even remember what hte word "nappy" MEANT let alone that it was a stereotype of black people when the whole "Nappy headed hoes" thing came out". The latter is appparently a stereotype I had no clue about until listening to a local radio show with a hispanic host that would at times randomly bring up how bad "his people" were about doing it (Northern VA having a fairly large hispanic population, so random stories would come up that would spur conversation).

    I think sometimes the stereotype in question has to be taken into account in terms of making the assumption about the likelihood of that person actually being honestly ignorant or just feigning it.

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker Case View Post
    For ****s and giggles, respond with "Who the **** are you callin' boy?" the next time a black person calls you a "white boy".
    That immedietely made me think of Tropic Thunder and "What do you mean 'you people'"

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
    Well I was born and raised in Michigan - lived there for almost 30 years
    Damn you people and your "pop". It's soda god damnit, stop being confusing with your language.

    that is all.


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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zyphlin View Post
    Damn you people and your "pop". It's soda god damnit, stop being confusing with your language.

    that is all.

    Waitress: And what would you like to drink?

    Me: A Coke.

    Waitress: Which kind of Coke?


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