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Thread: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

  1. #51
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker Case View Post
    You're making a similar point to what mak2 just made, and it's a good, interesting one. As I said to him, I have to think on it more before I can say anything in any direction on it.



    Yeah, I wouldn't really expect a non-American to be well versed in American stereotypes. In fact, when I heard about Sergio Garcia's comments, my first thought was "How much would a Spaniard really understand the racial implications of this comment?"

    This brings up another mistake I made in my OP (as I noted earlier, I'm in idiot mode today). I should have made it clear that this is fairly amero-centric. I would not expect people outside of the US to be familiar with our stereotypes or racial issues.
    American culture permiates the entire globe - people all over are aware - don't for a minute think that Garcia didn't know what he was saying. And from personal experience I would say that the average European is far more racist than the average American, by a long shot.
    "Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views." William F. Buckley Jr.

  2. #52
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Knowledge=power View Post
    'Stereotype' is a word used to make people feel badly about making a generalization. Generalizing is an adaptation of the human species for survival, which, when applied to the modern social environment, can misfire. Stereotypes exist for a reason - and that, my friend, is the gnarled, hideous truth.
    Stereotypes are a specific kind of generalization, often meant to disparage a group of people.

    For example: There exists a stereotype that states: "People who say "Stereotypes exist for a reason" are usually racists."

    Ironically, if we utilize their own assumptions, we can reach the conclusion that the above stereotype is often, if not usually, true. But the truth of the matter is that that particular stereotype only exists to disparage the people who say "stereotypes exist for a reason".
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  3. #53
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by mak2 View Post
    Which begs the question. do stereotypes need to be combated, or simply ingnored?
    Depends on the context.
    Racial stereotyping coming from a comedian on stage is one thing.
    (though the Michael "Kramer" Richardson incident just showed that he didn't know how to handle a heckler,which he should of.He lost control of the situation,and in my opinion he deserved the condemnation he got)
    Racial stereotyping coming from a real estate agent I'm trying to buy a house from is something totally different.

  4. #54
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by AliHajiSheik View Post
    If the stereotype has to be fully referenced, is it really a stereotype?

    Saying that one likes fried chicken is not a stereotype, but saying something like: "I'm all over fried chicken like a black person" is playing off a negative stereotype, which is inappropriate, at least. Making reference to an object or characteristic, and the group is what makes it a stereotype, so it is the context which makes it wrong.
    Why are you dodging the question I keep asking? does it frighten you in some way?
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker Case View Post
    Stereotypes are a specific kind of generalization, often meant to disparage a group of people.

    For example: There exists a stereotype that states: "People who say "Stereotypes exist for a reason" are usually racists."

    Ironically, if we utilize their own assumptions, we can reach the conclusion that the above stereotype is often, if not usually, true. But the truth of the matter is that that particular stereotype only exists to disparage the people who say "stereotypes exist for a reason".
    Correct. Making a generalization about a group of people does not have to be racist, or viewed as racist.

    For example - To say, "a lot of Asian people eat rice," would be a correct generalization, as rice is a major food source in Asian countries and has been for thousands of years. Is it racist to make an observation like this? No... It is not the stereotype itself (which is just an observation of sorts) it is the use of the stereotype itself - as you said, to disparage a group of people - which is wrong, or viewed as racist. The problem is, the racist gun has a hair-trigger, and fires accusation bullets with the slightest pressure needed.

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Knowledge=power View Post
    Correct. Making a generalization about a group of people does not have to be racist, or viewed as racist.

    For example - To say, "a lot of Asian people eat rice," would be a correct generalization, as rice is a major food source in Asian countries and has been for thousands of years. Is it racist to make an observation like this? No... It is not the stereotype itself (which is just an observation of sorts) it is the use of the stereotype itself - as you said, to disparage a group of people - which is wrong, or viewed as racist. The problem is, the racist gun has a hair-trigger, and fires accusation bullets with the slightest pressure needed.

    Stereotypes can be believed as a way to disparage. More often than not, stereotypes are based on the fallacy of hasty generalization and are also subject to confirmation bias.
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker Case View Post
    Stereotypes can be believed as a way to disparage. More often than not, stereotypes are based on the fallacy of hasty generalization and are also subject to confirmation bias.
    I agree with the part about confirmation bias, as this is also a natural flaw in the human brain - whether vestigial or not. I disagree about it being a fallacy of hasty generalization though, as stereotypes do not just develop overnight. If pitbulls were considered a docile and gentle breed, the first time you saw / heard of a pitbull attacking someone, you wouldn't make a generalization that pitbulls were in fact a violent and aggressive breed. You would most likely just assume it was a freak accident or a dog with unsual characteristcs and behavior for said breed.

    That's not to say all pitbulls are violent and agressive - there are exceptions to any stereotype. However, I'm willing to wager that more people than not would be willing to feed the neighbor's dog while they are on vacation if they had a golden retriever, rather than a pitbull.

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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Knowledge=power View Post
    I agree with the part about confirmation bias, as this is also a natural flaw in the human brain - whether vestigial or not. I disagree about it being a fallacy of hasty generalization though, as stereotypes do not just develop overnight. If pitbulls were considered a docile and gentle breed, the first time you saw / heard of a pitbull attacking someone, you wouldn't make a generalization that pitbulls were in fact a violent and aggressive breed. You would most likely just assume it was a freak accident or a dog with unsual characteristcs and behavior for said breed.

    That's not to say all pitbulls are violent and agressive - there are exceptions to any stereotype. However, I'm willing to wager that more people than not would be willing to feed the neighbor's dog while they are on vacation if they had a golden retriever, rather than a pitbull.
    Example of a stereotype based on the hasty generalization fallacy: Polish people are stupid.
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Verthaine View Post
    You should see the hatred I get from racist black women for being married to a white woman.
    I've seen that one. Supposedly the reason is all the decent black guys are taken so their available pool to potentials are limited. Plus, for whatever reasons, black ladies tend to not get involved with white men at the same rates as black men with white women. One lady told me once that its because of the history of slavery where black women were forced with be the concubines of their white masters, his sons, employees, etc. and feeling it would be dishonoring to their female ancestors to date a white man. Then when they see a good black guy with a white woman they get mad. There's even an often quoted line "why to all the successful black me..." You'll laugh if you google it what auto-fill finishes. I even heard a female Hispanic comedian joke that she likes black guys but none of them like her because she's not a chubby white girl. Anjelah Johnson - black guys don't like me - YouTube BTW: She's married now...to a black guy I know!

    PS. She's seems to have modified the joke and changed chubby white to having a big butt. Its probably still out there. Either way, she's hilarious
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    Re: Is it a good thing to be oblivious of racial stereotypes?

    It is pretty stupid of one to walk around oblivious of what world he is living in.

    You should know the stereotypes but don't trust them implicitly. Know that they have some truth to them, otherwise, they wouldn't exist, but they aren't the be all end all of people. people are complex beings and unless you are from the jersey shore, there is usually something more to a person.

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